COOKING OUTDOORS by Peter Dugmore [pdf, epub | 20,06 Mb] ISBN: B00FBFRVW4

  • Full Title: COOKING OUTDOORS: THE BIG BOOK: BBQ, Grilling, Slow Cooking, Salt-Curing, Cold Smoking, and More ((OUTDOOR COOKING: BARBECUE, GRILLING, COLD-SMOKING & SLOW-COOKING) Book 1)
  • Autor: Peter Dugmore
  • Print Length: 809 pages
  • Publisher: REALLY SIMPLE BOOKS; 3 edition
  • Publication Date: April 9, 2014
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: B00FBFRVW4
  • ISBN-13: 
  • Download File Format | Size: pdf, epub | 20,06 Mb
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COOKING OUTDOORS: THE BIG BOOK (formerly "The BIG Book of Outdoor Cooking" and now in its third edition) is a compendium of 10 stand-alone books in the same series, in which their author, Peter Dugmore, covers a complete spread of Master Chef outdoor cooking methods and techniques …
… at a price you could expect to pay for just one of the books from which the compendium is made up!
With over 700 information-packed pages, more than 500 PRO TIPS and shortcuts, generously illustrated, and written in simple language, the book covers everything from wilderness and campfire cooking, through smokehouse, barbecue and grilling to salt curing and outdoor slow-cooking in a cast-iron pot. Equipment for each of these cooking methods is covered in detail, and a range of easy smokehouse, barbecue pit and air drying plans and step-by-step construction details are provided for equipment you can simply and economically make for yourself. .
Passionate about grilling and slow-cooking around an open fire? You’ll learn not only what woods to use for different foods and applications, but a range of little known fire-making, grilling and slow-cooking secrets, as well.
For lovers of gourmet smoked and salt-cured foods there’s a compendious selection of mouth watering recipes. … Parma hams? Cold-smoked salmon? Pancetta and other "real" bacons? Spare ribs and brisket? Pulled pork? Jerky and biltong? Everything you need to produce foods you would otherwise find only in the most exclusive, and expensive, charcuteries and delicatessens, and the most upmarket of restaurants is right here – giving you all the taste, authentic flavour and trimmings of the store-bought items, but at a fraction of the cost! …
Readers of How-To Instructional books (like this one) fall somewhere between two extremes. At one extreme are those who want to know "Why?" before they learn "How?" At the other extreme are those who simply want a clear-cut set of instructions.
The publishers in this book unravel the Gordian knot – and satisfy both classes of reader by covering both the "Why" and the "How" in the first half of the book, while limiting the second half to just the "How".
Whatever your current level of expertise and skill, and whatever you want to know about cooking and preserving foods at home and out of doors, there’ll be something in this book to expand and enrich both your knowledge and enjoyment

 

Editorial Reviews

 

Keywords

D GILLESPIE

Big Fat Lies

HOW THE DIET INDUSTRY IS MAKING YOU SICK, FAT AND POOR

VIKING

an imprint of

PENGUIN BOOKS

Contents

Introduction

PART 1: The things we do that make no difference to our health

1. Why diets don’t work

2. The weight-loss methods we try

3. Exercise won’t help you lose weight, either

4. Vitamins – don’t waste your money

5. Salt and other minerals

PART 2: The real culprits: sugar and polyunsaturated fat

Introduction

6. Why we really gain weight – sugar

7. All about fats

8. Good fat, (very) bad fat

9. Polyunsaturated fats cause heart disease – and cholesterol doesn’t

10. Polyunsaturated fats cause cancer

PART 3: A practical guide to avoiding sugar and polyunsaturated fats

Introduction

11. Cutting out sugar – or, more precisely, fructose

12. Cutting out polyunsaturated fats (specifically seed oils)

13. So what are we allowed to eat?

Epilogue

Notes

Acknowledgements

BIG FAT LIES

DAVID GILLESPIE is a recovering corporate lawyer, co-founder of a successful software company and consultant to the IT industry. He is also the father of six young children (including one set of twins). With such a lot of extra time on his hands, and 40 extra kilos on his waistline, he set out to investigate why he, like so many in his generation, was fat. He deciphered the latest medical findings on diet and weight gain and what he found was chilling. Being fat was the least of his problems. He needed to stop poisoning himself.

His books Sweet Poison and The Sweet Poison Quit Plan have a wide following, as do his Sweet Poison website and Raisin Hell blog.

sweetpoison.com.au

PRAISE FOR THE SWEET POISON QUIT PLAN

‘For a “how to book”, The Sweet Poison Quit Plan is actually a remarkably interesting read.’ ANTHEA GLEESON, TOOWOOMBA CHRONICLE

‘Gillespie’s book is very readable and his quit plan has simple rules but detailed evidence.’ HOBART MERCURY

PRAISE FOR SWEET POISON

‘An eye-opening read on the health implications of too much sugar in our diet.’ GOOD HEALTH & MEDICINE

‘What’s impressive about Sweet Poison is that Gillespie turns complex research on what happens to food inside our body and its relation to weight gain into a good read.’ SYDNEY MORNING HERALD

‘Comprehensive, thought-provoking and highly readable.’ THE AGE

‘David Gillespie’s groundbreaking book on the dangers of a high sugar intake could well revolutionise the way you diet.’ A CURRENT AFFAIR

‘Sweet Poison is a worthy and impassioned effort by an Australian dad to share his surprising discoveries with struggling dieters and provoke further debate about the obesity epidemic.’ AUSTRALIAN BOOKSELLER & PUBLISHER

‘I’ve lost 11 kg without being on a diet. It’s good to know this book is non-fiction.’ STEVE IRONS MP, MEMBER OF THE PARLIAMENTARY INQUIRY INTO OBESITY

For Lizzie, Anthony, James, Gwendolen,

Adam, Elizabeth and Finlayson.

The information contained in this book is not intended as a substitute for consulting with your physician or other health care provider. The publisher and authors are not responsible for any adverse effects or consequences arising from the use of any suggestions, preparations or procedures contained in this book.

All matters relating to your health should be discussed with your doctor.

Introduction

Diets and exercise won’t help us lose weight. Vitamins and minerals are a waste of money and sometimes downright dangerous. Sugar makes us fat and sick. And polyunsaturated fat gives us cancer and works with sugar to give us heart disease. The evidence for all of these statements is abundant and unequivocal, but you won’t hear anyone in the food and diet industries tell you so. If they did it would have an immediate impact on their sales, and when it comes to a choice between their money and your health, three guesses (oh, okay – one, then) which of these wins.

The sad truth is that people like you and me are uniquely vulnerable in a world of chronic disease caused by ‘improvements’ to our food supply. A choice between corporate profit today and your health in three decades is no choice to a drug or food company or their shareholders. A choice between a government bureaucrat staying ‘on message’ with what they’ve said for the last four decades and your future health is no choice to them if they want to keep their job. A choice between a charity (such as the Australian Heart Foundation) attacking the source of its corporate sponsorship and how well you might be in 2041 is no choice to the people whose jobs depend on that sponsorship.

Even your doctor, the one person paid to have your health uppermost in their mind, is protecting you with both hands tied behind their back. At least one new medical journal article appears every 26 seconds. Just to keep up, your doctor would need to read 3300 journal articles
sherry wine, chicken curry recipe, outdoor bbq, baptism cakes, gluten free pizza crust,
tructions for making

the help of decorating classes, blogs, websites,

them work—every time.

online videos, books, and programs that are

Like all skills, cake decorating can take some

devoted to the subject. We are no longer afraid

time to learn and a little patience to master. Some

to bake, and our creations are becoming more

techniques are simple, others require practice.

sophisticated and adventurous as time goes on.

all, however, will help you to create original cakes, But how do we get started? What do we need to

cupcakes, 3-d creations, and cake pops that are

know to create beautifully decorated cakes with

sure to thrill your family and friends.

that perfect finish?

This is the ideal book for anyone who wants to

Happy decorating!

learn how to make spectacular cakes of their own.

With its unique user-friendly structure, detailed

step-by-step instructions, and exciting projects,

it guides and inspires as you master the basics.

an introductory illustrated Tools and

equipment section shows you what you need

to know to streamline and enhance the process

of decorating cakes. get started with a chapter

devoted to techniques for preparing and using your

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decoration planners

Decoration planners

Floral

Filigree wedding cake

pp.214–16

Ruffled cake

pp.224–25

Blossom stencil cake

Cupcake bouquet

Cigarillo wedding cake

pp.205–07

pp.198–99

pp.210–12

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9

Gerbera

Wedding mini cakes

Heart-shaped posy cake

p.213

pp.200–01

Cymbidium orchid

Orchids, cornflowers,

and baby’s breath

Purple roses

Butterflies and blossoms

Creating flowers and sprays

pp.184–85

pp.90–91

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decoration planners

Children’s

Princess cake pops

p.175

Teddy bear mini cakes

Princess castle

pp.190–91

pp.170–75

Dinosaur cake

Train cake

Pirate cake pops

pp.167–69

pp.164–66

p.179

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11

Rabbit

Scary cake pops

Halloween pumpkin cake

p.189

pp.186–88

Cow

Baby ladybug

Teddy bear

Pirate ship cake

Modeling characters

pp.176–79

pp.94–95

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decoration planners

Novelty

Handbag cake

Sports’ ball cakes

Suitcase cake

pp.202–04

pp.180–82

pp.208–09

Ballerina

Soccer

player

Gingerbread house

Modeling characters

pp.194–95

pp.94–95

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13

Elegant

Blossom stencil cake

pp.205–07

Calla spray

Shades of pink

pp.196–97

Creating flowers and sprays

pp.90–91

Damask

Cigarillo wedding cake

Ruffled cake

Stencil designs

pp.210–12

pp.224–25

pp.132–33

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decoration planners

Occasions

Christmas cake pops

p.223

Newborn celebration cake

pp.192–93

Filigree wedding cake

Halloween pumpkin cake

pp.214–16

pp.186–88

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15

Poinsettia

Creating flowers and sprays

pp.90–91

Tumbling teddy bears

Festive yule log

pp.218–19

Stencil designs

pp.132–33

Valentine’s hearts

Festive stars

Cigarillo wedding cake

Festive fruitcake

Plunger cutter designs

pp.210–12

pp.220–22

pp.104–05

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tools and equipment

Tools and equipment

Almost all of the different effects, textures, decorative touches and, indeed, perfect finishes for professional cakes rely on the use of specialty, widely available tools and equipment.

Assembling a toolkit of these essentials can make cake decorating so much easier.

Baking and assembling

Prepare a flawless cake with the help of specialty tools for baking, frosting, stacking, and presenting.

Dowels are cut

to size and used

to support heavy

decorations or

multiple cake tiers.

Icing scrapers, with different edges,

help to achieve a smooth or textured

finish with buttercream or royal icing.

Cake-pop sticks come in

a variety of lengths and are

used to support decorations.

Nonstick fondant mats help to measure, roll, and cut fondant,

Fondant rollers are essential dough, or other modeling pastes.

for ensuring that fondant, gum

paste, and other modeling clays

are smooth and evenly rolled.

Turntables

not only make

frosting cakes

easier, but also

allow you to

access all sides

with
vegan meal recipes, beef minestrone soup, decaf coffee, little caesars pizza, breads bakery,
perts to be every bit as good as the best prosciutto in Parma. In 2006, chef Paul Bertolli opened Fra’ Mani in Oakland, California, where he makes handcrafted salumi for retail and online sales. And, in the same city, chef Chris Cosentino started Boccalone in 2007. That same year, Cristiano Creminelli brought his family’s salumi business, also in the area of Biella, to the United States, opening Creminelli Fine Meats in Salt Lake City, Utah. Dozens of younger chefs, fascinated by the ancient craft, have since opened salumi stores throughout the country, and restaurant chefs have set up curing environments in their kitchens so that they can offer their own house-cured meats.

The ancient craft of salumi, which was scarcely known in this country, is now growing; the seeds have been planted and now have strong roots. As appreciation and demand for salumi grows, the craft has begun to thrive.

In this book, we explain and explore it, one of the oldest forms of cooking still practiced. We describe how it works, and the tools required to make it happen, and we provide the recipes and techniques to make the whole range of preparations called salumi. This is a craft that requires time, attention, care, and not a little ingenuity. Sometimes you may fail, but when you succeed, the rewards are more than commensurate with the effort. Indeed, when you eat great salumi, it can seem like magic. Because in a way it is.

Italian Salumi Versus American Salumi Is Not the Issue: Some Perspective

Is authentic Italian salumi possible in America? No, nor would we wish it to be. But can we make extraordinary American salumi? Yes, and artisans and cooks make it every day throughout the country.

The distinction between the two is an important one. Italian salumi is the result of a specific landscape and an atmosphere providing a consistent range of temperatures and humidity fundamental to the creation of exquisite dry-cured meats. The breeds of hog differ from ours, as does what they eat, and this in turn affects the flavor of the finished salumi (see Hog Breeds, page 27). The same is true of all the animals we eat, but the effects of environment, species, and diet are especially significant in dry curing, which is a way of “cooking” meat without ever bringing it above room temperature.

Yet, as with wine, Americans have proven to be fast on the uptake, aggressive learners, as the products of the salumi makers mentioned above attest. Italy is where it all flourished, however, and it is from Italy that we have taken our inspiration and education.

Etruscans and Romans put their environment—an atmosphere favorable to dry curing, and terroir that favors the hog, the most valuable and extraordinary animal we eat—to good use to preserve their food. And the care of their salumi was a matter of survival. As a present-day salumi maker put it to us when we traveled to the mountain town of Colonnata, “Sixty years ago, there were no roads up here. We lived off the hog.” His statement does not have the gravity on the page that it did on hearing it after we’d navigated a dozen impossibly narrow hairpin turns a thousand feet up into the Apuan Alps, the sheer white faces of the famous marble, carved out of the earth, shining in the sun along our way.

The people of Colonnata, who have mined marble there since before Michelangelo worked his own art with it, have always had to rely on the hog for survival. They preserved all cuts, surely, but they discovered that when the back fat (lardo) was cured in boxes made from the marble the town was built on, it was uncommonly delicious, far better than when simply cured in salt and aged in a cellar, as so much of the hog typically was. The hog fat was so delicate it melted on the tongue. A fine layer of crystalline salt coated its exterior, and when it was sliced thin, it retained a crisp line of salt to season and contrast the sweet soft fat.

Their lardo di Colonnata is the very definition of a regional specialty. It uses a material, marble, unique to the area, which gives the fat from hogs grown in this area qualities that cannot be developed in any other place. This is how local specialties happen. And sometimes local specialties become so popular that other marketers try to feed off the name. One lardo curer there told us that 200,000 kilograms of lardo are cured in those hills each year, but 9 million kilograms are sold with the Colonnata name. That is why the DOP stamp was created—DOP (Denominazione di Origine Protetta) indicates that the origin of the product is protected and that specific standards are maintained and overseen by the government.

Curing the hog in these isolated mountains began out of necessity, but the tradition has endured because the result is delicious. And because it’s been made here for thousands of years, the salumi makers have gotten really, really good at it
chicken rice, chinese food in my area, the paleo diet, low calorie diet, easy pasta recipes,
whisk or mixer, for about 30 seconds until frothy. If you add a pinch of cream of tartar, or dash of vinegar or lemon juice, at this point, the slight acidity will help the structure of the whites to stiffen. Then increase the speed and continue whisking – the whites will become a mass of tiny bubbles, with a very smooth and fine texture. Soft peak is when you lift the whisk and the peak of whites on it slightly droops down. The next stage, after more whisking, is stiff peak when the peak stands upright. You should also be able to turn the bowl upside down without the whites falling out.

• whisk to the ‘ribbon stage’ For whisked sponges, eggs and sugar must be whisked thoroughly to build up a thick mass of tiny air bubbles that forms the structure of the cake. Use a large bowl – after 4 or 5 minutes of whisking on high speed, the initial volume of eggs and sugar will increase five-fold. Using a large free-standing electric mixer is the easiest and quickest way to whisk eggs and sugar to the ribbon, but you can also use a hand-held electric whisk or, if you’re not making a large quantity, a rotary whisk. The ribbon stage is reached when the whisked mixture becomes very thick: if you lift the whisk out of the bowl, the mixture on it will fall back on to the surface of the mixture in the bowl to make a distinct thick, ribbon-like trail.

CREAM

• whip cream Make sure the cream is well chilled before you start (in warm weather, pop the bowl and whisk into the fridge to chill too). This will prevent the butterfat from separating and the mixture from curdling as you whip. You can use a hand-held electric whisk, a rotary whisk or a wire whisk. If you are going to fold the cream into another mixture, whip the cream to soft peak stage (see Whisk egg whites, here). For piping, whip the cream to a slightly firmer peak.

PIPING

• fill a piping bag Put the piping bag in a large glass or tall mug and fold the top of the bag over the rim (the glass/mug will support the piping bag, making it easier to fill). Spoon the icing/cream/meringue into the bag, filling it about two-thirds full. Unfold the bag from the glass/mug, then twist the top of the bag to push the icing down to the tip or nozzle end, getting rid of any air pockets. Twist the top again to compact the icing.

MAKING A PASTRY CASE

• line a flan tin or pie plate Roll out the pastry dough on a lightly floured worktop to a disc about 8cm larger than your tin. Roll up the pastry around the rolling pin and lift it over the flan tin, then unroll the pastry gently so it drapes over the tin. Flour your fingers and gently press the pastry on to the base and up the side of the tin, smoothing out any pockets of air. Leave the excess pastry hanging over the rim of the tin, or roll the pin over the top of the tin to cut off the excess (if there are any holes in the pastry case, use these dough trimmings to patch them). With your thumbs, ease the pastry up the side of the tin, just slightly higher than the rim, to allow for shrinkage during baking. Curve your forefinger inside this new rim and gently press the pastry over your finger so it curves slightly inwards – this will make it easier to unmould after baking. Prick the base of the pastry case well with a fork, then chill for 20 minutes. If you need to keep the pastry case in the fridge for any longer, loosely cover with clingfilm to prevent the pastry from drying out.

• bake a pastry case ‘blind’ Crumple up a sheet of baking or greaseproof paper, then flatten it out (this makes the paper easier to fit). Line the pastry case with the paper and fill with ceramic baking beans or dried beans. Place in the heated oven and bake for 12–15 minutes (or as the recipe directs) until the pastry is firm. Carefully remove the paper and beans, then return the tin to the oven and bake for a further 5–7 minutes (or as the recipe directs) until the pastry is thoroughly cooked and starting to colour (this is vital to avoid the dreaded ‘soggy bottom’). Pastry containing sugar needs to be watched carefully as it can burn on the edges before the base is cooked through. If this happens, reduce the oven temperature slightly, or cover the rim with a long strip of foil.

• ‘knock up’ a pastry edge Use the back of a small knife to make small horizontal cuts all around.

• flute or scallop a pastry edge Place 2 fingers on the pastry edge to press it down and draw a small knife between them. Continue all around the edge.

BAKING CAKES

• skewer test For richer, heavier cakes, fruit cakes and dense chocolate cakes, the way to test if the cake is done is to stick a wooden cocktail stick or fine skewer into the centre of the cake. If the stick or skewer comes out clean rather than damp with cake mixture adhering, the cake has finished baking. Note though that for some recipes, such as Brownies, the cocktail stick should come out slightly sticky; this is to avoid over-cooking a cake that is supposed to
idli recipe, greek food recipes, egcg green tea, list of ice cream flavors, chinese food,
………150

xii

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Homemade Ice Cream 11 Yogurt 151

Yogurt Shops vs. Make-at-Home …………………………152

Yogurt-Making Basics …………………………………………153

Raspberry Yogurt ………………………………………………154

Lime Yogurt ……………………………………………………..154

Honey Yogurt ……………………………………………………155

Strawberry Yogurt …………………………………………….156

Chocolate Yogurt ………………………………………………..156

Vanilla Yogurt ………………………………………………….157

Cranberry Yogurt ………………………………………………157

White Chocolate Coconut Yogurt …………………………..158

Banana Yogurt ………………………………………………….159

Cantaloupe Yogurt …………………………………………….159

Mocha Yogurt ……………………………………………………160

Maple Yogurt ……………………………………………………161

Orange Marmalade Yogurt ………………………………..161

Peach Yogurt ……………………………………………………162

Brown Sugar Yogurt …………………………………………163

Apricot Yogurt ………………………………………………….163

Coffee Yogurt ……………………………………………………164

12 Gelato 165

Zabaglione Gelato …………………………………………….167

Banana Gelato ………………………………………………….168

Vanilla Gelato ………………………………………………….169

Apricot Gelato ………………………………………………….170

Chocolate Gelato ………………………………………………..171

Cheese Gelato ……………………………………………………172

Coffee Gelato ……………………………………………………173

Part 4: Toppings

175

13 The Classic Toppers

177

The Most Popular Toppings ………………………………..178

Hot Fudge Sauce ………………………………………………179

Chocolate Fudge Sauce Topping …………………………….180

Quick Hot Fudge ………………………………………………181

Butterscotch Sauce …………………………………………….182

Contents

xiii

Caramel Sauce ………………………………………………….182

Quick Caramel Sauce …………………………………………183

14 Fruit-Based Sauces

185

Orange Sauce ……………………………………………………186

Raspberry Sauce ………………………………………………..186

Lemon Sauce ……………………………………………………187

Apricot Sauce ……………………………………………………187

Pineapple Topping ………………………………………………188

Strawberry Sauce ………………………………………………188

Cherry Topping ………………………………………………..189

15 Other Sauces

191

Whipped Toppings …………………………………………….191

Other Mix-Ins ……………………………………………………192

Claret Sauce ……………………………………………………..193

Marshmallow Sauce …………………………………………..193

Ginger Sauce ……………………………………………………194

Maple Sauce ……………………………………………………..194

Pecan Mocha Sauce …………………………………………..195

Melba Sauce ……………………………………………………..195

Date Topping ……………………………………………………196

Honey Topping ………………………………………………….196

Peanut Butter Brown Sugar Sauce ……………………….197

Walnuts in Syrup ………………………………………………197

Whipped Cream Topping ……………………………………198

Part 5: Sundaes, Cones, and More

199

16 Classic Ice Cream Desserts

201

The Sundae ……………………………………………………….201

Parfaits ………………………………………………………………204

Banana Split ……………………………………………………….205

Ice Cream Sandwiches …………………………………………206

Maple Syrup Parfait …………………………………………207

Chocolate Parfait ………………………………………………207

Crème de Menthe Parfait ……………………………………208

Choc
, ist aber noch weich und etwas klebrig.

3 Den Teig in eine große geölte Schüssel geben und abgedeckt bei ca. 24 °C etwa 1 1/4 Stunden gehen lassen. Nach 30 Minuten einmal zusammenfalten und zurück in die Schüssel legen. Anschließend den Teig auf einer mit Mehl bestreuten Arbeitsfläche zu einem Laib formen. Entweder in einen Gärkorb legen oder eine Schüssel mit einem bemehlten Tuch auslegen und den Teig darauf geben. Dann mit einer Klarsichtfolie locker abdecken und den Teig 45 Minuten ruhen lassen. Das Volumen sollte sich um etwa 50 Prozent vergrößern.

4 Den Topf im Backofen auf der untersten Einschubleiste auf 250 °C aufheizen (das dauert ungefähr 45 Minuten).

5 Den Topf mit gut isolierten Küchenhandschuhen aus dem Backofen holen und den Teig hineinlegen. Dreimal schräg einschneiden, den Deckel auflegen und zurück in den Backofen stellen. Die Temperatur auf 220 °C reduzieren und das Brot 50 Minuten backen.

6 Den Topf aus dem Backofen nehmen (Küchenhandschuhe nicht vergessen!), das Brot auf einen Rost stürzen und auskühlen lassen.

Das Rezept habe ich von einer kleinen Bäckerei in Cavalaire in Südfrankreich. Dort haben wir dieses luftige Landbrot einen Sommer lang jeden Morgen zum Frühstück gekauft.

Kastanien-Speck-Brot

Arbeitszeit: ca. 15 Minuten | Gärzeit insgesamt: 2 Stunden | Backzeit: 40 Minuten

für einen 3 l Topf

Brotlaib ca. 1 kg

25 g Trockenhefe

1/4 TL Rohrzucker

3 EL lauwarmes Wasser (38 °C)

150 g Kastanienmehl (Reformhaus)

500 g Weizenmehl, Type 1050

300 ml Wasser

1 EL Salz

125 g gewürfelter durchwachsener Räucherspeck

Außerdem

Mehl für die Arbeitsfläche

1 Die Hefe mit dem Zucker im lauwarmen Wasser auflösen. Kastanienmehl, Weizenmehl, Wasser und die Hefemischung in die Rührschüssel der Küchenmaschine geben und mit dem Knethaken auf kleinster Stufe ca. 3 Minuten verrühren. Dabei das Salz einrieseln lassen.

2 Den glatten, aber relativ weichen Teig auf einer mit Mehl bestreuten Arbeitsfläche zu einer Kugel formen und in eine mit Mehl ausgestreute Schüssel legen. Mit Klarsichtfolie abdecken und bei Zimmertemperatur (ca. 21 bis 24 °C) ca. 1 1/2 Stunden gehen lassen.

3 Gewürfelten Speck in einer Pfanne auslassen und das Fett abgießen. Die Speckwürfel unter den Teig kneten. Teig zu einem runden Laib formen. Mit einem Tuch abdecken und nochmals ca. 30 Minuten ruhen lassen.

4 Den Topf im Backofen auf der untersten Einschubleiste auf 200 °C aufheizen (das dauert ungefähr 30 Minuten).

5 Topf mit gut isolierten Küchenhandschuhen aus dem Backofen nehmen, Deckel abnehmen und den Laib hineinlegen. Topf wieder verschließen und in den Backofen stellen. Das Brot 40 Minuten backen. Nach 25 Minuten die Hitze auf 175 °C reduzieren.

6 Den Topf aus dem Ofen holen (Küchenhandschuhe nicht vergessen!), das Brot auf einen Rost gleiten und auskühlen lassen.

Manchmal gebe ich noch 50 g gedünstete Zwiebeln dazu. Das Brot ist pur, mit etwas Butter bestrichen, einfach nur lecker.

Müsli-Joghurt-Brot

Arbeitszeit: ca. 15 Minuten | Gärzeit insgesamt: 4 1/4 Stunden | Backzeit: 65 Minuten

für einen 3 l Topf

Brotlaib ca.1,2 kg

Vorteig

10 g Trockenhefe

1 TL Ahornsirup

75 ml lauwarmes Wasser (38 °C)

100 g Weizenmehl, Type 1050

Teig

500 g Weizenvollkornmehl

100 ml lauwarmes Wasser (38 °C)

25 g geschmolzene Butter

1 TL Salz

400 g griechischer Joghurt

200 g ungezuckertes Haferflocken-Müsli mit Nüssen und Trockenfrüchten (z. B. Bircher)

Außerdem

Mehl für die Arbeitsfläche

Öl zum Einölen der Schüssel

1 Für den Vorteig Hefe und Ahornsirup in lauwarmem Wasser auflösen. Weizenmehl in eine Schüssel geben und mit der aufgelösten Hefe vermischen. Mit Klarsichtfolie abdecken und bei ca. 24 °C etwa 3 Stunden ruhen lassen.

2 Für den Teig Weizenvollkornmehl, Vorteig und Wasser in der Schüssel der Küchenmaschine mit dem Knethaken 2 Minuten auf Stufe 1 verrühren. Butter, Salz, Joghurt und Müsli zugeben und weitere 5 Minuten auf Stufe 2 kneten.

3 Den festen, glatten Teig zu einer Kugel formen, in eine große geölte Schüssel geben, mit Klarsichtfolie abdecken und bei ca. 24 °C etwa 1 1/4 Stunden gehen lassen.

4 Den Topf im Backofen auf der untersten Einschubleiste auf 220 °C aufheizen (das dauert ungefähr 35 Minuten).

5 Den Teig auf einer mit Mehl bestreuten Arbeitsfläche zu einem Laib formen und mit einem bemehlten Küchentuch bedeckt etwa 20 Minuten ruhen lassen.

6 Den Topf mit gut isolierten Küchenhandschuhen aus dem Backofen holen und den Teig hineinlegen, kreuzweise einschneiden, den Deckel auflegen und zurück in den Backofen stellen. Die Temperatur auf 200 °C reduzieren und das Brot 65 Minuten backen.

7 Topf aus dem Ofen holen, (Küchenhandschuhe nicht vergessen!), das Brot auf einen Rost gleiten und auskühlen lassen.

Mein Mann sagt, es sei das perfekte Frühstücksbrot, und isst es am liebsten mit Erdnussbutter und Erdbeerkonfitüre bestrichen.

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