[epub | 1 022,17 Kb] How to Grow Mushrooms at Home by Randall Frank – read pdf online free

  • Full Title: How to Grow Mushrooms at Home: Guide to Indoor Mushroom Farming for Health and Profit
  • Autor: Randall Frank
  • Print Length: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Homesteading Publishers; 1 edition
  • Publication Date: September 22, 2013
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1927870224
  • ISBN-13: 978-1927870228
  • Download File Format | Size: epub | 1 022,17 Kb
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Directions
Learn about how you can be a part of ‘fungiculture’ and grow mushrooms at home for health and profit. This book explains how mushrooms grow, how to grow mushrooms, what mushrooms to grow, and the amazing health benefits of eating certain types of mushrooms. You will discover mushrooms are easy to grow and many have protein, B vitamins, minerals and some tout medicinal properties such as boosting the immune system, lowering cholesterol, and having a positive effect on certain cancers. In addition there are tips, methods, and insider techniques for growing mushrooms and marketing them. How to Grow Mushrooms at Home is the ultimate guide to indoor mushroom farming.

 

Editorial Reviews

 

Keywords

ITY

AND TO CILLÍAN, BY FAR THE

BEST THING I EVER MADE.

WORK HARD, PLAY HARD,

AND KARAOKE.

CONTENTS

Cover

Title Page

Dedication

Introduction

APARTMENT DAYS The Restaurant in Apartment No. 205

Recipe Notes BRAISED AND CARAMELIZED VIETNAMESE COCO PORK BELLY (AKA THIT KHO)

LEMONGRASS CHICKEN

LEMONGRASS TOFU

BRAISED COCA-COLA JACKFRUIT

TAIWANESE FRIED PORK CHOP

JAPANESE CURRY MEATBALLS

PREPACKAGED CURRY!

NOM NOM PORK (AKA NEM NUONG)

GARLIC NOODLES (AKA MAKE-OUT NOODLES!)

Tofu Balls: A Practice in Being Vietnamese/Cantonese CRISPY TOFU BALLS

LUNCH DAYS Kitchen Ninja CUCUMBER MINT AGUA FRESCA

HONEY SESAME DRESSING

DOUBLE-FRIED CHICKEN WAAAAAAAAAAAANGS

SWEET GINGER CHICKEN WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAANG SAUCE

TANGY KOREAN PEPPER PASTE WING SAUCE

TAMARIND WING SAUCE

PANDAN/GALANGAL CHICKEN

KOREAN SPICY PORK BELLY

KARA-AGE

“CRACK” KRAB CAKES

MALAYSIAN CHICKEN CURRY

MALAYSIAN COCO CHICKEN

PINEAPPLE BEER CHICKEN WING SOUP

SALTED PLUM LYCHEE PANNA COTTA

TAIWANESE MINCED PORK W/ PICKLED LICORICE CUCUMBERS

Failures 4½ CHEESE BACON MAC AND CHEESE

VIETNAMESE EGGROLLS (AKA CHA GIO)

FIRST DINNER POP-UP Banana Suit Confidential CITRUS SESAME TOFU

BÓ LÀ L´ÔT (GRILLED BEEF WRAPPED IN SESAME LEAVES)

VIETNAMESE BEEF CARPACCIO

GREEN CURRY SILKY TOFU

RIBEYE SATAY NOODLES

BRAISED SPICY CHICKEN FEET

SHRIMP AND PORK CHILI OIL WONTONS WITH SZECHUAN SHREDDED POTATOES

SESAME OIL SPARERIBS

Marijuana—A Meal for One and All OSMANTHUS PANNA COTTA W/ RED WINE POACHED PEARS

PANDAN BAVARIAN CREAM

PROFITEROLES

SALTED DUCK EGG CEREAL PRAWNS

Growing Up Asian CLAYPOT CARAMELIZED STRIPED BASS

GRILLED FISH HEADS AND TAILS

SECOND POP-UP / BUTTON MASH Legal Loopholes and Why I Keep Getting Into and Out of Trouble SODA CHANH (AKA VIETNAMESE LIME SODA)

WATERMELON GINGER AGUA FRESCA

GINGER SESAME RAINBOW ROASTED CARROTS (AKA ROASTED CARROTS WITH SWEET SOY GLAZE)

MISO CHARRED BRUSSELS SPROUTS

MUSTARD GREENS AND PANCETTA

CANTO-STYLE CHAYOTE, ENOKI, AND GOJI BERRIES

SHRIMP TOAST (BRUSCHETTA)

CLASSIC DOUBLE CHEESEBURGER

ALMOND “TOFU” JELL-O

FIVE-SPICE APPLE FRITTERS (FORMERLY KNOWN AS FLUFFY THE APPLE FRITTER AND ITS BANANA JAM SIDEKICK)

BLACK SESAME PANNA COTTA

GREEN TEA LEMON LATTE COOKIES

The Thai Prostitute Who Introduced Me to Pandan/Kaya PANDAN CHURROS

COCONUT KAYA CREAM

SWEET AND SOUR RIBEYE BEEF

HANOI GRILLED TURMERIC FISH WITH DILL AND ONION

BUN CHA HANOI (AKA HANOI GRILLED PORK BELLY AND PORK PATTY)

TRIPLE-COOKED OSMANTHUS PORK SPARERIBS

Death and Rebirth SPICY KOREAN NOODLES

DAN DAN NOODLES/MIEN

BANH BEO (AKA STEAMED VIETNAMESE RICE CREPE)

POPIAH (AKA BO BIA)

SOY BEAN JICAMA

FRENCH/GREEN/LONG BEANS

CURRY TOFU “FRIES”

GOOD OL’ OMELET

HOISIN PEANUT DIPPING SAUCE

SPAM BRUSSELS SPROUT FRIED RICE

GALANGAL CHICKEN FRIED RICE

SHRIMP AND GRILLED PINEAPPLE FRIED RICE

ROAST PORK BELLY

ROAST PORK BELLY XO FRIED RICE

VIETNAMESE MINCED BEEF-TACULAR

SINGAPOREAN CHILI CRAB

CHILI CRAB SAUCE

BUTTERMILK BEER BEIGNETS

BLACK PEPPER CRAB

Full Circle SINGAPOREAN CHILI CRAB GUMBO

FUNEMPLOYMENT Chaos and Pork Chop Sandwiches BRAISED PORK BELLY WITH VIETNAMESE FERMENTED SHRIMP PASTE AND LEMONGRASS

JAPANESE CURRY ROUX

CHICKEN FRIED STEAK (AKA COUNTRY FRIED STEAK)

BASIC RECIPES BANH MI

BEEF TALLOW / RENDERED BEEF FAT

CARAMEL SAUCE

COCO RICO VIETNAMESE FISH SAUCE

DARK ROUX

GINGER SESAME SAKE SAUCE

HONEY BOURBON CREAM SAUCE

PICKLING LIQUID

ESCABECHE

PICKLED KOHLRABI

PICKLED MUSTARD GREENS

PICKLED PERSIAN CUCUMBERS

PICKLED RED ONIONS

PICKLED SHREDDED CARROTS AND DAIKON

PICKLED WATERMELON RINDS

SPICY AIOLI

STARRY KITCHEN MAYO

SUPERCONCENTRATED CANTONESE CHICKEN STOCK

Acknowledgments

Index

About the Author

Credits

Copyright

About the Publisher

INTRODUCTION

HI, I’M NGUYEN. I’M NO ONE SPECIAL.

I MEAN, I’M JUST A VIETNAMESE-AMERICAN “KID” WITH A MOM AND DAD WHO LEFT THEIR HOMELAND AT THE END OF THE VIETNAM WAR AT THE RESPECTIVE AGES OF SIXTEEN AND SEVENTEEN, CAME TO THE STATES, GOT KNOCKED UP, HAD A KID WHO WAS A PICKY EATER (ME), MOVED TO THE GREAT STATE OF TEXAS, GAVE BIRTH TO MY MUCH MORE ARTISTICALLY TALENTED YOUNGER SISTER VIVIEN (NOT ME), AND WORKED NEARLY AROUND THE CLOCK MANAGING LOCAL 7-ELEVENS TO AFFORD US A BETTER LIFE.

I (barely) grew up on chips and queso, hamburgers and hot dogs, and other kinds of standard American fare (T.G.I. Friday’s chicken fingers and their long-forgotten creole mustard are still my JAM. Ohhhhh yes!). I resisted eating Vietnamese food because I couldn’t understand being “just Vietname
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CHAPTER 27

From Hearth to Table: Late Medieval Cooking Equipment

Françoise Piponnier

PART SIX

THE EUROPE OF NATION-STATES (15TH–18TH CENTURIES)

INTRODUCTION

The Early Modern Period

Jean-Louis Flandrin

CHAPTER 28

Growing Without Knowing Why: Production, Demographics, and Diet

Michel Morineau

CHAPTER 29

Colonial Beverages and the Consumption of Sugar

Alain Huetz de Lemps

CHAPTER 30

Printing the Kitchen: French Cookbooks, 1480–1800

Philip Hyman and Mary Hyman

CHAPTER 31

Dietary Choices and Culinary Technique, 1500–1800

Jean-Louis Flandrin

CHAPTER 32

From Dietetics to Gastronomy: The Liberation of the Gourmet

Jean-Louis Flandrin

PART SEVEN

THE CONTEMPORARY PERIOD (19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES)

INTRODUCTION

From Industrial Revolution to Industrial Food

Jean-Louis Flandrin

CHAPTER 33

The Transformation of the European Diet

Hans Jurgen Teuteberg and Jean-Louis Flandrin

CHAPTER 34

The Invasion of Foreign Foods

Yves Péhaut

CHAPTER 35

The Rise of the Restaurant

Jean-Robert Pitte

CHAPTER 36

The Food Industry and New Preservation Techniques

Giorgio Pedrocco

CHAPTER 37

The Taste for Canned and Preserved Food

Alberto Capatti

CHAPTER 38

The Emergence of Regional Cuisines

Julia Csergo

CHAPTER 39

The Perils of Abundance: Food, Health, and Morality in American History

Harvey A. Levenstein

CHAPTER 40

The “McDonaldization” of Culture

Claude Fischler

CONCLUSION

Today and Tomorrow

Jean-Louis Flandrin and Massimo Montanari

Index

PREFACE

Albert Sonnenfeld

Culinary history has moved to the front burner, joining proliferating recipe collections, cookbooks, and celebrity chef albums as hot items for our age of pluralistic cultural studies. Publication of this English-language edition of Food: A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present could not have come at a more opportune time. “Food is such a powerful dimension of our consciousness as living things,” the distinguished anthropologist Sidney Mintz said, “to omit it from the study of human behavior would be egregious.”

The American Center for Wine, Food and the Arts, located in Napa, California, and financed by the Mondavi Winery, has broken ground for a 2001 opening. The annual scholarly Oxford University Food Conferences, organized by historian Theodore Zeldin, have long since established the legitimacy of the field in Anglo-American intellectual circles. Alan Davidson’s Petits propos culinaires, the American Institute of Wine and Food’s Journal of Gastronomy, and the Cornell-based review Food and Foodways provide ongoing scholarly outlets. The Oxford Book of Food is soon to appear, and Barbara Haber, director of the culinary collection of the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College, not complacent with her own spectacular holdings, is compiling a Web-site directory of relevant materials in other American libraries and private collections. Various “foodie” professional organizations now routinely appoint such learned “visiting scholars” as Dr. B. H. Fussell to educate their membership in historical perspectives.

Culinary history is slowly but surely entering the curriculum as a respectable academic field. Three hundred anthropologists in the United States list food studies as their specialty; courses in food and culture are increasingly widespread at the University of California-Berkeley, Emory University, and the Johns Hopkins University. There are degree-granting programs burgeoning at Boston University, Cornell University, and NewYork University, even reaching into the ever expanding cooking schools (careers in food services are at the top of job opportunities). With the popularity of historically based “theme restaurants” (one thinks of the historical research in the works of Apicius preceding the opening, say, of Joe Baum’s Forum of the Twelve Caesars), and the fashion of recherché fusion cuisine in London and the Zagat-driven cities of America, serious would-be chefs are turning to history to seek out the origins and secrets of the exotic savors of the past. An American chef could now, in theory, open an Etruscan restaurant—thanks to historical research: the authenticity may not be in his blood, but it might well be in his files. Contemporary restaurant criticism, long looked to primarily for excessively personalized hyperventilation leading to a planetarium of quantified stellar ratings, is responding to Chef Mark Miller’s stricture: “Most lack intellectual weight, because few critics have the knowledge or experience to put restaurants into a larger historical and social context. The best art, music, and theater critics provide insight that restaurant critics rarely do.” But the writings of Mimi Sheraton, Raymond Sokolow, and Jeffrey Steingarten show how his
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the goods

We choose the ingredients or “goods” we use in our cake recipes wisely—we know WAY too much about the vast world of chocolate chips, which is how we know which brand and size we like best. This section is your guide when you grocery shop or take inventory of your kitchen cabinets.

Can’t find an ingredient at your local grocery store? Never underestimate the power of amazon.com—we’re their unofficial spokes-bakery. (Don’t worry, our payday is near…)

Bananas, rrrrrrrrripe

Bananas are easy to procure, but ripened bananas is an art we take quite seriously. Buy them a few days before you plan to use them. Ripen them on the counter, in a brown paper bag, or in the freezer (my fave pro tip!), until the skins are jet-black and the fruit has turned to mush. Though visually unappealing, this is when bananas are at their absolutely most flavorful! If you’re a household that keeps a heavy stock of bananas, pay it forward and always keep an airtight container of very ripe bananas frozen (still in their skins), so you never have to wait to make the Banana-Chocolate–Peanut Butter Crock-Pot Cake (this page) or Banana-Chocolate-Hazelnut Cupcakes (this page). Just remember to defrost and remove the banana from its blackened skin before using!

Butter

I know you know what butter is. We love butter at Milk Bar and spend a lot of money on the really good stuff (Plugra). Unsalted, European-style butter is the best of the best for these recipes; it’s higher in fat, typically 82 percent.

Chocolate, all of it

Generally, we stand by Valrhona for 55% feves, 72% feves, and cocoa powder, and suggest you do the same. Baller chocolate in a recipe = insanely delicious cake out of the oven. (Also “feves” = flat wide disks of chocolate that make melting easy. If you can only find chocolate in a block or brick, just be sure to chop it down well for even melting.)

Mini Chocolate Chips: Semisweet mini chocolate chips are our chip of choice for flavor and distribution. Nestlé and Barry Callebaut do the job just right.

White Chocolate:…is not even technically chocolate because it contains cocoa butter, but no cocoa solids (the stuff that makes chocolate brown and delicious). We use it as a thin shell around the cake truffles, and as a base for certain cake swirls, but mostly rely on it for its technical properties like setting a glaze and giving a great mouthfeel without adding a competing flavor. Feel free to choose whatever white chocolate (even in chip form) you can get your hands on.

Citric or ascorbic acid

You can find citric or ascorbic acid powders marketed as “sour salt” in the spice aisle, or as vitamin C powder in the vitamin aisle, or just buy them by their own name online. We use them interchangeably to enhance the flavor in many of our citrus-based recipes.

Corn powder

We invented corn powder, but we’ll give away our secret: It’s freeze-dried corn kernels you can buy online or at a Whole Foods near you. Then in a blender, grind it into a flour-like consistency, and store it in an airtight container. It is yellow gold, this I promise you. It is the hard-to-put-your-finger-on flavor in our cereal milk ice cream and crack pie filling and adds an insanely fresh and natural depth whether the flavor goal is straight-up corn or not, without disrupting texture or consistency. There is absolutely no substitute for it, and we use so much of it that we figured we should start selling it in our stores and at milkbarstore.com, too!

Dulce de leche

Dulce de leche is sometimes called “milk jam” and it’s exactly as delicious as that sounds. There are a ton of different ways to make dulce de leche, but we prefer simmering an unopened can of sweetened condensed milk, label removed, fully submerged in a pot of water for 2 hours. Make sure the water level is always 2 inches above the can, or the can might explode in your face! Cool the can completely before opening, or another in-your-face explosion could occur.

You can also find cans of dulce de leche in the international aisle or at a Latin supermarket. La Lechera is our favorite brand. If you want to get a little adventurous, use cajeta in lieu of dulce de leche. It’s quite similar, but made with goat’s milk so it has more of a funk to it.

Extracts

We’re not into using flavor extracts as a crutch, but when used wisely and sparingly, they can help impart certain flavors without affecting the science of baking in a recipe. When we call for them, it’s for good reason.

Vanilla Extract: This is the extract you know and love and can find anywhere. It’s a dark vanilla color and scent, and awesome in almost any baked good (except where clear vanilla extract is called for; see following). McCormick will always do right by us.

Clear Vanilla Extract: Find it online. Some grocery stores carry it,
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than 250,000 copies in a country with a population of only 5.5 million people. Since then, Christian and Arne have worked closely together, combining their work with Jennie’s to show that it is restriction of high GI carbohydrates, not calories, that is the key to achieving and maintaining weight loss. The result is a brand-new way of losing weight and, just as important, maintaining your current weight, whether you’re coming off a significant weight loss or just hoping to stave off those gradual but insidious gains of a pound here and there that seem to sneak up on us all.

Because this book is all about preventing incremental weight gain or “creep” (the kind that adds up year after year) and preventing regain after weight loss, you’ll get the best results if you are within a few pounds of your optimal weight when you begin. The Nordic Way is not designed to promote rapid weight loss (see here for protocols we have found most effective for jump-starting your weight stabilization goals). Once you are where you want to be—or if you are there already—our program will help you stay there without feeling like your life is one perpetual diet. At the same time, you’ll gain a host of health benefits that optimize your metabolism, preventing inflammation and cutting the risk that you’ll develop type 2 diabetes, heart disease, of suffer from dementia or cancer as you grow older.

THE WORLD’S LARGEST DIETARY STUDY

Denmark is a small country (again, only 5.5 million people) and the capital city of Copenhagen is just one third the size of New York City, but Copenhagen University is one of the world’s leading centers for nutrition research and the epicenter of Arne’s study of the effect of foods, meals, and drinks on health and weight control.

The DiOGenes study is the largest of its kind and has been carried out in eight European countries with a total budget of more than $20 million including support from the European Union. The first and most important results were announced in November 2010 in the world’s finest medical journal, New England Journal of Medicine, as well as in Circulation and Pediatrics.

The aim of the DiOGenes study was to compare the official dietary recommendations in Europe, which are very similar to American ones, with a diet based on the newest nutrition knowledge in a large group of European families, totaling 938 overweight adult family members and 827 children.

Nine Countries Where the Nordic Way Has Been Proven to Prevent Weight Regain

Denmark, United Kingdom, Holland, Spain, Greece, Bulgaria, Germany, Australia, and the Czech Republic

THE DIOGENES STUDY

We tested four new dietary patterns with different amounts of protein and types of carbohydrates against conventional national recommendations to find the one pattern that worked best. We already knew that protein produces higher satiety than carbohydrates and fat, mainly due to a more powerful effect of protein on the satiety hormones GLP-1 and PYY, both released from the lower small intestine when protein and, to some extent, fat fragments enter. Two diets had high protein and two had average levels, and two had low-glycemic-index carbs and two had high. The term glycemic index (GI) is one you may already be familiar with—it’s used for classifying the impact of carbohydrates on the blood glucose (or blood sugar). If a food has a low GI, it means that it increases your blood glucose more slowly after consumption compared with a high-GI food.

It should be noted that the adults in the study came to it having been on a regimen of meal replacements for eight weeks to lose at least 8 percent of their weight before we started our phase of the investigation. This is because the focus of the study was to work out how to keep weight off after it had been lost. However, we have subsequently come to appreciate that this plan can be used as a weight loss program in its own right, resulting in a gradual loss of 2 to 4 pounds per week, as well as a highly effective hedge against the incremental weight gain that is associated with aging.

After losing weight, the participants were randomly divided into five different diet types (see box, below). In total, 548 participants completed the six-month dietary intervention. The results were striking: 30 percent fewer participants of the high-protein/low-GI group gave up halfway through the project compared with the group prescribed a lower-protein/high-GI diet. The group who ate high-protein/low-GI foods also performed best—and actually lost another half kilo without trying over the next six months rather than gaining! The remarkable thing was that in spite of the fact that they had just lost 20 pounds, the high-protein/low-GI dietary recommendations were able to keep them satisfied and full. Contrast that with the group assigned to the standard diet
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the delicate flavour of the rosemary, but you can, of course, use any honey. If you want to keep things really simple, they are equally delicious without the rosemary. Madeleines are best eaten fresh on the day of baking, but they do freeze well.

75 g/5 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons (runny) honey

2 fresh rosemary sprigs

2 large eggs

100 g/½ cup (caster) sugar

50 g/⅓ cup self-raising flour

½ teaspoon baking powder

50 g/½ cup ground almonds

a small pinch of salt

a 12-hole madeleine pan, well buttered and lightly dusted with flour

Makes 18

Put the butter, honey and sprigs of rosemary in a small pan over the lowest possible heat. Heat gently, giving it a swirl now and then. Take the pan off the heat and let the mixture cool and infuse for 15 minutes.

Put the eggs and sugar in an electric mixer (or use a large mixing bowl and an electric whisk) and whisk until pale and mousse-like – this can take up to 10 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 200˚C (400˚F) Gas 6.

Sift the flour into a mixing bowl and stir in the baking powder, almonds and salt. Add half the melted butter mixture (removing the sprigs of rosemary as you do so) and half the flour mixture to the beaten eggs and sugar. Using a large metal spoon, fold everything together quickly but gently. Repeat this process with the remaining melted butter mixture and the flour mixture.

Fill the holes of the madeleine pan with mixture. Bake the madeleines in the preheated oven for 8–10 minutes, or until golden and risen. Let the madeleines cool in the pan for a couple of minutes, then remove (you may need a table knife to help ease them out) and transfer to a wire rack. Wash, re-grease and re-flour the pan before baking the remaining mixture. You will make about 18 madeleines in total depending on the size of the holes in your pan.

plum, orange and double almond crumble tartlets

If you are not a confident pastry maker, you shouldn’t have any problems here, as this is a well-behaved pastry recipe. These tarts can also be turned into mince pies for Christmas – just substitute the jam and plums with 400 g/3 cups mincemeat.

Pastry base

200 g/1½ cups plain/all-purpose flour

100 g/6½ tablespoons unsalted butter, softened

1 tablespoon icing/confectioners’ sugar, plus extra for dusting (optional)

1 large egg, lightly beaten

Crumble filling

75 g/⅓ cup demerara sugar

25 g/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, chilled and cubed

50 g/⅓ cup plain/all-purpose flour

3 tablespoons rolled oats

1 rounded tablespoon flaked/slivered almonds

grated zest of 1 large orange (use a zester, if you have one, rather than a fine grater)

3 ripe but firm plums

25 g/2 tablespoons shelled almonds (skin on)

7–8 tablespoons plum jam, such as Victoria or damson

a fluted 9-cm/3½-in. cookie cutter

2 x 12-hole muffin pans, oiled

Makes 24

To make the pastry base, put the flour, butter and icing/confectioners’ sugar in an electric mixer. Mix for a minute or until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add the egg and briefly mix again. As soon as the pastry starts to come together, tip it onto the work surface and bring it together in a ball. Press the ball into a disc, wrap in clingfilm/plastic wrap and chill it for 30 minutes.

To make the crumble filling, briefly mix the sugar, butter and flour in the electric mixer, again until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Stir in the oats, flaked/slivered almonds and orange zest.

On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the pastry until it is about 2 mm/⅛ inch thick. It may be easier to roll out half at a time. Using the cutter, stamp out rounds and use to line the holes of the pans – the pastry will come about halfway up the side of each hole. Gently re-form and re-roll the pastry, then keep stamping out rounds until you have 24. Chill the pastry-lined pans for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, halve, stone/pit and chop the plums into pea-sized pieces. Roughly chop the whole almonds.

Preheat the oven to 200˚C (400˚F) Gas 6.

Put a teaspoon of jam in each pastry case, then divide the chopped plum between them, followed by the crumble. Sprinkle each with chopped almonds.

Bake the tartlets in the preheated oven for 15–18 minutes, or until golden. Let cool for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack. Eat warm or cold but not hot, as the jam will burn easily. Dust with icing/confectioners’ sugar.

coffee and pecan cupcakes with praline

These are best made and eaten on the same day, but the undecorated cakes will keep well in the freezer if you want to make a batch to decorate later.

3 tablespoons instant coffee granules

6 tablespoons boiling water

275 g/¼ cups (caster) sugar, plus 2 tablespoons

175 g/1½ sticks butter, softened and cubed

3 large eggs

175 g/1⅓ cups self-raising flour

100 g/⅔ cup pecans, chopped

Frosting

200
into the stewed cherries when you remove them from the heat for a fresh, sweet burst of juicy flavor. A scoop of the cheese and fruit is great on waffles or with a bagel.

EGGS · CRÈME FRAîCHE · PUMPERNICKEL · SMOKED SALMON · CAPERS

SMOKED SALMON and PUMPERNICKEL STRATA

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Line the bottom of an 8-inch square cake pan with parchment paper.

Whisk the eggs and 2 ounces crème fraîche in a large bowl and season well with salt and pepper. Add the pumpernickel cubes and let stand 20 minutes, until the bread has soaked up some of the egg and softened. Pour the mixture into the lined pan and bake until the eggs are just set, 25 to 30 minutes.

Let the strata stand for 10 minutes to cool slightly. Run a knife around the edges and cut into 6 to 8 pieces and transfer to a serving platter.

Serve the strata with the remaining crème fraîche, smoked salmon, and capers on the side as garnish for your guests.

12 large eggs

4 ounces crème fraîche, divided

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste

2 large slices (about 3 ounces) pumpernickel bread, lightly toasted and torn into 1-inch pieces

4 ounces sliced smoked salmon

2 tablespoons drained capers

————————————

YIELD: 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

————————————

What makes this recipe really sing:

Pumpernickel, smoked salmon, and capers is a classic combination in any bagel shop in New York, but it’s the crème fraîche, with its creamy, velvety texture and tart flavor, that turns plain eggs into a breakfast fit for a four-star hotel.

What to toss in if you have it:

Although the capers add a tart bite, some finely minced red onion scattered over the strata will add a savory kick that is a great partner with the salty salmon.

PLUMS · BUTTER · HONEY · CINNAMON · YOGURT

ROASTED PLUMS with GREEK YOGURT

Preheat the oven to 400ºF.

Put the plums cut side up in a baking dish. Melt the butter in a small saucepan, whisking in the honey, cinnamon, and a pinch of salt. Drizzle the hot honey butter over the plums and roast in oven until very soft, about 12 minutes.

Spoon the warm plums and sauce over yogurt and serve immediately.

8 fresh black plums, halved and pitted

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

3 tablespoons honey

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

Pinch of kosher salt

Fat-free Greek yogurt

————————————

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

————————————

What makes this recipe really sing:

Roasting fruit helps concentrate their juices and natural sugars. It’s particularly helpful to roast fruit that are not at their seasonal peak to coax more flavors out of them.

What to toss in if you have it:

Sprinkle your favorite organic granola or a few handfuls of toasted almonds and walnuts for a complete breakfast full of protein.

PORK · MAPLE SYRUP · SAGE · SHALLOT · DIJON MUSTARD

HOMEMADE MAPLE BREAKFAST SAUSAGE

Combine all the ingredients and wrap tightly with plastic wrap. Chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour and up to overnight.

When ready to cook, form the mixture into small patties about ¼-inch thick and 3-inches wide; cook in a skillet over medium-high heat, turning once, until golden brown and completely cooked through, about 8 minutes total. Serve warm.

1 ½ pounds ground pork shoulder

2 tablespoons Grade B maple syrup

1 teaspoon dried sage

1 shallot, finely chopped

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

1 teaspoon kosher salt

————————————

YIELD: 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

————————————

What makes this recipe really sing:

The nice thing about making your own sausage is you control the fat and seasonings. If you want it spicy, go for it with a couple pinches of chili flakes. You don’t need a meat grinder to make sausage, just buy the pork already ground or have your butcher grind it.

What to toss in if you have it:

This sweet and savory sausage is great with some very finely diced apple (added to it before cooking), which will make the sausage moister and sweeter. If you like Italian sausage, add a teaspoon of fennel seeds.

BUTTER · BANANAS · AGAVE SYRUP · EGG · FLOUR

BROWN BUTTER BANANA MUFFINS

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper muffin liners.

Put the butter in a small saucepan or skillet and melt over medium heat. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the milk solids have turned a nutty golden brown; remove from the heat and let cool.

Peel the bananas and mash in a large bowl with a fork until liquefied. Add the agave syrup and egg and stir well; pour in the butter and whisk until completely combined. Add the flour and, with a rubber spatula, fold it into the wet ingredients until just combined; do not over mix. With an ice cream scoop, evenly divide the batter among the muffin tin cups.

Bake in the center of the oven unti

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