Food Energetics by Steve Gagné – ISBN: 1594772428 [great pdf books]

  • Full Title: Food Energetics: The Spiritual, Emotional, and Nutritional Power of What We Eat
  • Autor: Steve Gagné
  • Print Length: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Healing Arts Press; 3 edition
  • Publication Date: November 1, 2008
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594772428
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594772429
  • Download File Format | Size: epub | 1,99 Mb
Download Link

>>>Download<<<

 

Directions
Explains how food imparts a living wisdom that is separate from the science of nutrient values

• Offers an approach to diet from the perspective of ancient peoples, who understood how the energetic qualities of food affect both physical and spiritual health

• Includes a comprehensive catalog of the energetic properties of myriad foods–from chicken, beef, and potatoes to garlic, avocados, zucchini, and grapefruit

Food is more than simply fuel. It imparts a living wisdom that is beyond the science and mechanics of calories, grams, and nutrient values. Ancient peoples, through their relationships with the plants and animals providing their food, understood that their food conveyed the unique energetic qualities of its source, such as swiftness from wild deer and groundedness from root vegetables. With the rise of agribusiness and industrial food production, people have become disconnected from the sources of their food and are no longer able to register the subtle rhythms, harmony, and energies that food can convey. This separation has thrown the basic human-food relationship out of balance–to the detriment of human consciousness.

In Food Energetics, Steve Gagné shows how to revitalize our connection to food and remedy our physical and psychic imbalances with the wisdom of food energetics. He provides a comprehensive catalog of foods and their corresponding energetic properties and explains how each food affects us at the deepest spiritual level. By demonstrating how to plan meals that incorporate both dominant and compliant foods, he shows how to provide truly healthy cuisine that nourishes the body and the soul.

 

Editorial Reviews

Review

Food Energetics is a comprehensive, easy-to-understand, and absolutely essential explanation of the spiritual dimensions of food. If you believe in the concept of living things having a soul, this book describes the soul qualities in all of our foods. Here is the ultimate explanation of the term soul food.” (Russell Mariani, author of Healing Digestive Illness)

“Nobody understands the power, magic, and impact of food better than Steve Gagné. Prepare to read, eat, and be transformed!” (John David Mann, coauthor of The Go-Giver:A Little Story About a Powerful Business Idea)

“This book is exceptional in the field of diet today. Steve Gagné’s deep, informed perspective helps elucidate the thoughts of Michael Pollan and gives us access to a simple, user-friendly way of understanding food.” (Joshua Rosenthal, author of Integrative Nutrition)

“One of the most important insights for anyone who has personally experienced the diet/disease, diet/symptom connection is the awareness of inevitable food diet dogma–meaning, the initial tendency for any student of natural health to create fairly hardedged principles around what is Right Food and Wrong Food and believe them as incontrovertibly true for the rest of their life and for all of humanity. Generally at that moment, a student of natural health will join one of the groups that best fit those beliefs, be it the All Raw group, or Vegetarianism, or Macrobiotic/Vegan/ Natural Hygiene/Paleolithic or any other of the well-known food philosophies. Gagné gently helps dislodge this dogma and gets us to see a wider view of what food is, what it isn’t, and how it has been used by healthy cultures throughout the world to heal and stay healthy. Whether you are just waking up to the realization that most of your symptoms are diet related or are an old salt in the study of the food and health connection, Food Energetics is simply a must-have book.” (Scott Ohlgren, author of The 28-Day Cleansing Program)

From the Back Cover

NUTRITION / ENERGY MEDICINE

Food Energetics is a comprehensive, easy-to-understand, and absolutely essential explanation of the spiritual dimensions of food. If you believe in the concept of living things having a soul, this book describes the soul qualities in all of our foods. Here is the ultimate explanation of the term soul food.”
–Russell Mariani, author of Healing Digestive Illness

Food is more than simply fuel. It imparts a living wisdom that is beyond the science and mechanics of calories, grams, and nutrient values. Ancient peoples, through their relationships with the plants and animals providing their food, understood that their food conveyed the unique energetic qualities of its source, such as swiftness from wild deer and groundedness from root vegetables. With the rise of agribusiness and industrial food production, people have become disconnected from the sources of their food and are no longer able to register the subtle rhythms, harmony, and energies that food can convey. This separation has thrown the basic human-food relationship out of balance–to the detriment of human consciousness.

In Food Energetics, Steve Gagné shows how to revitalize our connection to food and remedy our physical and psychic imbalances using the wisdom of food energetics. He provides a comprehensive catalog of foods and their corresponding energetic properties and explains how each food affects us at the deepest spiritual level. By demonstrating how to plan meals that incorporate both dominant and compliant foods, he shows how to provide truly healthy cuisine that nourishes the body and the soul.

STEVE GAGNÉ is a natural health and nutrition counselor who began researching and teaching food energetics in 1972. He teaches throughout the United States and Europe and continues to study traditional cultures and their dietary practices in remote parts of the world. He lives in Colorado.

 

Keywords

contents

DEDICATION

INTRODUCTION

1

bread

Toast

Toasting Techniques

Quinoa-Millet Bread

Variations

2

brekky toasts

Avocado Classic

Smoked Trout and Grapefruit

Togarashi Egg Salad

Oyster Omelet

Smoked Salmon

Rillettes

Harissa Scramble

Bacon and Date

Madagascar Banana

Apricot-Stuffed French Toast

Green Guru Eggs

Tomatillo Egg

Ricotta Part I: Lavender Ricotta

Ricotta Bonus Round: Jam-Swirled Ricotta Pancakes

3

hors d’oeuvre toasts

Scallop Carpaccio with Kalamata-Orange Relish and Lemon Aioli

Nectarine Caprese

Grilled Hearts of Palm with Saffron Hummus

Herbed Goat Cheese and Grilled Vegetables

Roe Out

Edamame Basil

Hot Miso Crab

Pesto Swirl

Kale and Artichoke Caponata

Zingy White Beans and Tomatoes

Grape and Goat

4

non-veg toasts

Seared Tuna Tatsoi

Escargots and Mushrooms

Niçoise

Marinated Shrimp, Celery, and Green Olives

Fig Bagna Cauda and Watercress

Chickpea and Chorizo

Thai Crab and Cucumber

Paprika Sherry Shrimp Skillet

Chile-Orange-Cured Salmon with Cilantro Crème Fraîche

Rosemary Caper Tuna Salad

Bay Scallops and Pear-Onion Jam

Grandpa Sardines

Cilantro Shrimp Salad

French Onion Toast

Fresh Sardines and Parsley-Apricot Gremolata

Grilled Zucchini and Bottarga

Lobster Carbonara

5

veg toasts

A Love Story: Burrata + Toast

Grilled Radicchio and Apples

Spice Roasted Radishes and Mint Feta Yogurt

Grilled Cheese with Romaine and Bosc Pear

Spinach and Sweet Pea

Big Tomato

Carrot Ribbons

Ricotta Part II: More Flavors

Golden Beets and Vadouvan Yogurt

Fennel Parmesan Slaw

Shaved Asparagus and Serrano-Basil Butter

White Bean Avo

Mushroom Hunks

Roots

Cucumber Tzatziki and Roasted Jalapeños

Delicata Squash and Orange Butter

Carrot Butter and Halloumi

Chipotle Eggplant

Cauliflower Melts

Walnut Potatoasts

Brown Sugar Chipotle Sweet Potato and Carrot

Butternut Squash, Robiola, and Apples

Roasted Eggplant and Raisin Chutney

Hot Brussels Sprouts

Spicy Red Lentil

Spiced Apple Chutney

6

extra bread

Panzanella

Maple-Pear Bread Pudding

Honey-Citrus Sundae Toast

Lemon-Lavender Sweet Toast

Midnight Snacks

Watermelon

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

TOAST COLLAB

UNIVERSAL CONVERSION CHART

INDEX

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

CREDITS

COPYRIGHT

ABOUT THE PUBLISHER

introduction

James Beard said, “Good bread is the most fundamentally satisfying of all foods; and good bread with fresh butter, the greatest of feasts.” It’s the most basic, the most coveted, and the most craved. It’s the tradition that brings us to the table, how we start the day, and the happy beginning of many other meals as well.

One of my first jobs in New York was as a waitress at a now-closed restaurant on the Lower East Side. Because of that job, I speak of being a waitress as “my favorite job.” I loved being in the hot seat, with food, beverages, and the perfect pacing of a first date all on my shoulders.

The best part of that job was the bread and butter.

Julie and Tasha, the chef-owners, made herb butter, and it was part of the waitresses’ job to scrape it into little dishes, sprinkle them with salt, and drop them at our tables after guests had placed an order. When the butter was at the right temperature and the Pullman loaf was fresh and sticky, it was impossible to go a shift without being asked by every table for more of both.

The customers were happy, but I was happier, owing to my discovery of the panini press.

After setting up the bread service, I’d spread any leftover butter onto as many pieces of bread as I could cover. I’d pop them in the panini press and grill up some perfect toast. This would sustain me until shift drink, when I’d make some more. That taste—hot, crusty bread, a little soft in the center, with a layer of buttery grilled herbs—put me on the path that resulted in this book.

1

bread

Toast

Toasting Techniques

Quinoa-Millet Bread

Variations

In New York City, I’m surrounded by superb bread. Breads Bakery and Maison Kayser aren’t only in my dreams; they are in Union Square. Bien Cuit and Runner & Stone in Brooklyn are worth a subway ride. There are the classics like semolina raisin at Amy’s Bread, pizza bianca at Sullivan Street Bakery, baguette at Balthazar. Even if I’m doing one-stop shopping, Dean & DeLuca, Agata & Valentina, Citarella, and Whole Foods all have great selections.

And when I’m not in New York City, great bread, thankfully, is in abundance. The Whole Foods in Boulder, Colorado, has a tremendous selection. Huckleberry in Los Angeles does great English muffins. Servatii in Cincinnati has unrivaled pretzel bread. There’s a mom-and-pop bakery in most small towns. Fantastic bread—or at least pretty great bread—isn’t terribl
sitar indian restaurant, italian minestrone soup, chai tea latte, butter chicken, pizza columbus ga,
hat my interest in cooking became a passion and eventually an obsession. I traveled down to East Cork to study at the famous Ballymaloe Cookery School, which at the time had been going for six years, and at which I still teach to this day. It was at the cooking school that I met its founder, Darina Allen, who would eventually become my mother-in-law! I also met her mother-in-law, Myrtle Allen, the matriarch of Irish food who had founded the Ballymaloe House Restaurant and guest house all the way back in 1964.

On my first day at the cooking school I learned many of the principles that we still teach students today: That the best food comes from the best ingredients and that means carefully grown crops and lovingly raised animals. The school sits in the middle of an organic farm from which we get the students’ cooking ingredients. It opened my eyes to how much more important proper produce is than complicated or long-winded recipes.

This is echoed by our impressive and still rapidly expanding modern Irish food culture. Ours is not a history of elaborate multilayered dishes. Irish food is about local produce. The greenest grass in the world feeds the happiest cows, which in turn produce the most beautiful butter and cheeses. We have teams of small dedicated farmers who put their efforts into growing delectable crops and our cold water creates the sweetest seafood. With ingredients like this, I think it’s important not to dress up the food too much, to let their flavors take center stage. Whether you and your family live in New York or Minnesota, Cape Town or Brisbane, I’d always encourage you to buy from your local producers and farmers’ markets, keep your home cooking simple and make the most of the fantastic ingredients the fertile plains of America or stunning coast of Australia have to offer. This book is filled with simple and easily achievable dishes that I love to cook and, perhaps most importantly, that I love to eat!

The recipes range from light suppers for a summer’s evening to big hearty casseroles for when the wind is blowing and the rain is lashing down. There are everyday dinners for school nights when you’ve been at work all day, as well as slightly more involved recipes when you want to make something a little more special. All the recipes are easy to follow and not at all difficult to execute.

I’ve also included four passages about each of the different provinces in Ireland, with information about the food as well as the people, their history, and folklore. Irish culture is ancient but alive and vibrant, with food a fundamental piece of it. Part of our history is the waves of emigration and there are so many people—especially in the US—who have Irish ancestry and heritage. I hope that through our food you can connect both to the history of Ireland and to the wonderful country that it still is today.

Soups and light meals

These are the sorts of dishes I like to serve as a casual supper or a light lunch. They are versatile recipes and not too filling. A soup, for example, can easily feed a family if accompanied by lots of delicious crusty bread. Probably due in no small part to our blustery and bracing weather, there is a real tradition of warming soups in Ireland. It might be a nourishing broth such as the West Cork Broth with Gubbeen Bacon or a rich and creamy comforting soup like the two different chowder recipes in this chapter.

Lots of the recipes in this chapter would also work really well as an appetizer for a larger meal. Asparagus with Hollandaise sauce is one of my absolute favorites when made with perfect Irish butter from our greenest pastures. It makes the most divine supper on its own, but if you’re having guests over, then a few asparagus spears cooked this way is a lovely way to begin a meal. The same is true of the wonderfully Irish combination of fresh oysters with a glass of Guinness.

Asparagus on toast with hollandaise sauce

Asparagus has to be my favorite vegetable. The exquisitely flavored bright green spears have a season that is always sadly short. Ireland has perfect growing conditions to produce some of the best asparagus I’ve ever tasted. There are lots of different ways of cooking and serving asparagus, but to me this is the very best: simply boiled in salted water and served on Brown Soda Bread with butter and lashings of hollandaise sauce.

Vegetarian

Serves 4

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

16 to 20 asparagus spears

Good pinch of salt

A few slices of Brown Soda Bread

Butter

Hollandaise sauce

Snap off the tough woody end of each asparagus stalk and discard. Fill a large saucepan to a depth of 1½ to 2½ inches (4–6cm) with water, add the salt, and bring to a boil. Tip in the asparagus and cook in the boiling water for 4 to 8 minutes, until tender when pierced with a sharp knife. Drain immediately.

While the aspa
ben and jerry’s ice cream, what are streaks, boiled custard, types of grills, masala tea,
nt, you’re eating for two. But I wrote this book because I want to change that thinking. I want you to eat for you.

What do I mean by that? My patients know. As an OB/GYN with a full-time practice—not to mention in my roles as Chief Women’s Health Correspondent at ABC News, and as co-host of The Doctors—it’s my mission to deliver the most accessible, up-to-date and actionable information to ensure you stay healthy during your pregnancy, and deliver a beautiful, bouncy bundle of joy at the end. (And I’ve delivered more than 1,500 of them!)

That means you’ll need to know the essential vitamins and key nutrients your little one needs to grow, and which foods stave off defects, gestational diabetes, and other complications. And it means you should ask your OB/GYN or midwife to join you in learning, so you can work together to control your nutrition. With 66% of reproductive-age women overweight or obese, the need to combat unhealthy and uninformed eating is a responsibility we all share.

But “eating for you” also means being practical.

Because I know you’re more than just a mom-to-be. You’re a mom-to-be who’s got a thousand other jobs, from career woman to budding chef to amateur yogi to professional Pinstagrammer and possibly, maybe, if you have 5 minutes left, wife (and perhaps you’re a mom already, in which case, you know what I mean). No matter how you spend your time, chances are you don’t have much of it—and certainly don’t want to spend the next nine months measuring the folate counts in every box of cereal, or starving on your next road trip because Burger King doesn’t serve kale.

You need nutrition. And you need it now. And although cooking your own food is the surest way to maintain a healthy diet, you probably can’t do so every day for the next nine months.

That’s why I wrote Eat This, Not That! When You’re Expecting, the only book of its kind by a doctor qualified to talk about nutrition, physiology, and disease—who will also tell you what to do the next time you’re at the salad bar, in the yogurt aisle, or at Mickey D’s.

Because, let’s be honest, momma’s gonna crave a little Mickey D’s.

And she’s going to need clean energy, too. That’s why I’ll also tell you how delicious wild salmon, fresh and creamy smoothies, and time-saving foods like rotisserie chicken or frozen meals can be essential building blocks for healthy trimesters. In the end, you’ll discover not just what to eat, but how to enjoy the foods you love.

You’ll eat for you, while nourishing baby, too.

Why We Need This Book—Now

If you were to walk into my office, the first thing you’d realize about me is, I’m a woman (what gave it away?), a doctor (with an M.D. from Columbia), and a mother (on my desk are photos of my two kids, now teenagers somehow).

But shortly after that, you’d learn I’m also formally educated in Nutrition. Oddly enough, not too many people can say they’re all of those things.

During my 16 years of practicing medicine, I’ve met a lot of nutritionists who aren’t credentialed doctors and a lot of doctors who aren’t credentialed nutritionists. That’s why, after becoming an M.D., I decided to get Board Certified in obesity medicine, and complete a Master’s in Human Clinical Nutrition at Columbia. I needed those credentials to talk about nutrition because I talk about nutrition a lot, and not just with my patients. When you’re on TV, telling women to lose weight, gain weight (in a healthy way), and eat right, you better know what you’re talking about. More importantly, you better also provide actionable advice.

It’s amazing how few doctors, even OB/GYNs, do that. They don’t because they can’t.

When I went to medical school at Columbia, and graduated in 2000, we had almost zero formal nutritional training. Over the last 15 years, we’ve seen a growing shift in not just interest in nutrition but in nutritional information. The medical community is finally catching up, realizing food is medicine.

Thanks to Eat This, Not That!, consumers have wised up, too, and demand to know what’s in their meals. If food is medicine, this book tells you which to take.

How to Eat Right Every Time

Pregnancy, labor, and delivery are athletic events, so why not train for them? Nutrition is a key part of that training, and as a result, can be daunting.

I encourage my patients not to associate pregnancy with the “d-word.” For some, it’s “disease”—no judgment; it can feel that way on dark days. For others, it’s a word that can be even more loaded: “diet.” But we should not look at the next nine months as being filled with limitations; we should look at them as an opportunity. Here’s a few thoughts to remember:

It’s never too late to change

…or tweak or improve the way you eat, and that goes for everyone. I’ve met women for whom finding themselves pregnant is the catalyst
foods to eat on keto diet, gourmet coffee, weber barbecue, pancake maker, pulled pork,
the view into Vermont. The trails on the ski slope at Stratton Mountain had snow on them, but it was man-made snow. Nevertheless, the view was inspiring. People in New Hampshire paid a surcharge on their taxes for views like these—a view tax it was called. A tax upon the eyes, and the spirit. Bruce’s view tax must have been a pretty sum.

Ken’s Lot is the sugarbush closest to the buildings and the lot named after Bruce’s father, Ken Bascom, who ran this farm from the 1950s until he retired.

Ken’s Lot ran along the eastern slope of Mount Kingsbury and curved around the northern part of the mountain. To get to the edge of it I walked up the hill and by what they called the “New Building,” the warehouse with a giant refrigerated basement that Bruce erected in 2010. I came upon a stand of sixty-year-old maples, tall trees with straight trunks, well spaced apart, each with its own piece of ground and sky above. Tubing lines ran to all the maple trees, which gave the woods an industrial pallor, but they were still beautiful. Walking in these woods always brought me the feeling of peace, and another feeling I can’t quite identify but associate with the idea of dignity.

I hadn’t walked far when I heard the sound of the work, the tap of a hammer on a spout. I stopped and listened and heard the drill, and looked through the trees and saw one of the workers, one of the tapping crew. I headed that way and saw Gwen Hinman.

Gwen is a sheepshearer who takes time off each year when her work is slow to tap trees at Bascom’s. When the sugar season gets underway she checks tubing lines for leaks. Over the last two years I saw Gwen work not only at tapping trees but also in some difficult situations after storms. After a snowstorm with winds, when trees and branches fell upon the tubing, I found her wading through deep snow to repair and refasten broken lines. After a heavy ice storm that caused worse damage and resulted in a week of repair work I followed Gwen as she raced through the woods checking tubing for leaks, and for spouts pulled out of the trees. She worked in a rainstorm that day and had to empty her boots and wring out her socks every once in a while. The first time I saw Gwen in the woods I walked right up to her out of the surprise of seeing a woman there, and I must have startled her. I asked her how long she had been doing this, and she first said, “I don’t know.” Then, after a moment, “about ten years.”

A year ago, in this same lot when it was very cold, I watched Gwen tap trees while standing on two feet of frozen snow. Now there were only traces of snow on the ground. There had been two storms this season, a Nor’easter at the end of October that brought three feet of snow and another brief storm in mid-January. But in this section exposed to the sun, that snow had all melted. Gwen was walking on leaf cover on this warming day.

“I see you again,” I said. I told her she didn’t have to stop working on my account, that I didn’t want to prevent her from putting in her thousand taps, the number each member of the crew aimed for each day.

“That’s okay,” she answered. “I did twelve hundred a couple of days ago. I can miss a few.”

She went to another maple tree and drilled a hole. She used a portable hand drill. The drill bits were just over a quarter inch in diameter, and a thin stream of shavings dropped to the ground. She set the drill into her tool belt, pulled out a hammer, pulled a spout from a belly pack, and set it into the hole. She gave it three taps. A woman named Deb Rhoades, who had been tapping for forty years, told me that three taps was just right and four was too many, though she could tell by the sound if the spout was driven correctly. The sound of the spout going in had a flutelike quality, and when a tapping crew worked in close proximity, the woods had a rhythm and ring. One time I had seen a distressed woodpecker come flying across a ravine to see what was going on, perching and watching for a while before flying away, cawing out its disapproval.

After she set the spout Gwen pulled from a fitting a looped eighteen-inch length of tubing, called a dropline, and attached it to the spout. Immediately sap flowed out of the maple and into the tube.

“It’s really running,” I said.

“Yes, it is,” Gwen answered. “And the vacuum pumps haven’t even been turned on. There are three thousand gallons in the tank at the sugarhouse now.”

She stood casually with the drill in her hand, bit pointing upward, and said she had been working for four days. She was alone here, and three other tappers were on the northern side of Ken’s Lot. She said, “It’s good ground for tapping, especially compared to last year.” The snow had been deep and frozen then. “They put me on level ground the first few days so I could get my legs in shape. I’m in better shape this year anyway because I’ve been playing hockey and shearing a lot of sheep.”

Gwen was tall and slender, with greenish eyes and
grilled steak recipes, indian desserts, english tea, gluten free phyllo dough, panang curry,
irloin. For the next two or three days we ate cold roast beef, rather rare, which we adored. I don’t remember ever having it hashed up or reheated in any form. Salmon was always poached; when hot, it came with a sauce made from its cooking liquor, reduced. When cold, with mayonnaise. We ate a lot of salads, for my father loved cold food. He insisted on making the salad dressing himself; bottles of olive oil and vinegar, salt, pepper, sugar and Worcestershire sauce were laid out on a side table. My father was terribly fussy about his food; the only comments I remember hearing were criticisms.

Each winter, before the war, my parents would spend two months travelling to warm places like Mexico or South America, or sailing with friends. My father had had tuberculosis as a young man, and had been advised to winter abroad. Then my sisters and I would have food that seemed even duller than when our parents were at home. For good as our food was, in its way, it was not the sort to appeal to a child. It never occurred to me then that food could be fun, or in any way enjoyable.

In the 1930s my parents had a small house in St James’s Place, and each summer my mother would travel south to enjoy herself. My father would join her for a little while, then he would go back to Scotland with a sigh of relief. For although he loved travelling, he disliked London and social life equally. In the early 30s, before I was born, my sisters would also go to London, but they had to stay with Nanny in the Stafford Hotel next door, for the house was too small to hold them all. In London the two little girls found themselves thrown into another world without warning, with terrifying ordeals like Lady Astor’s fancy-dress parties, and dancing classes with the little Princesses. Our Scottish nanny took it all in her stride, and remained unimpressed. When one of the smart nannies at the dancing class enquired whether we were going away for the summer, Nanny replied dourly: ‘We’re away the noo.’ My elder sister was less phlegmatic. When faced with a crowded London street for the first time, she burst into tears, wailing: ‘All these people, and nobody knows us.’

This privileged way of life changed abruptly – and for good, in our case – with the outbreak of war in 1939. Our house in Scotland was turned into a hospital for wounded soldiers and the family moved into one end of it. Our cook, Mrs Jones, found herself cooking for about a hundred people, including patients and nurses. It was to her credit, and to the nature of our somewhat austere diet, that our food changed hardly at all. (Mrs Jones was later awarded the OBE.)

After only eighteen years the country found itself again in the grip of food rationing. But this time the Government was prepared, and ration books were already printed, awaiting distribution. Much had been learnt during the First World War, when rationing had only been introduced halfway through, in 1916. By 1920 it was already coming to an end, unlike the aftermath of the Second World War, when rationing dragged on for almost ten years. The study of our national diet brought about by the First World War was to prove of immense value, not only in combating the war to come, but also in the Depression of the early 30s. By 1931 the nation’s health was causing grave concern, especially in poor mining districts like Yorkshire and Lancashire. The Ministry of Health set up an Advisory Committee on Nutrition, which issued a series of pronouncements, urging the British to eat more fruit and raw vegetables, cheese, milk and oily fish. As usual, their advice was largely ignored, for, as George Orwell pointed out in The Road to Wigan Pier, it is only the rich who want to eat healthy food and breakfast on orange juice and Ryvita. The poor, living on the breadline in a permanent state of lassitude and depression, needed the quick lift they got from food like sliced white bread and jam, sweet tea, and fish and chips.

For the well-off, and especially for the young, the end of the First World War was followed by a period of euphoria. Everyone wanted to enjoy themselves and to live, at least for a time, purely hedonistic lives. As Loelia Lindsay recalled in her memoirs: ‘Wounded soldiers in their blue suits and red ties disappeared from the square gardens and hospital wards became ballrooms again. London was dancing mad – it seemed we couldn’t have enough of it.’

The same mood, influenced by the United States, brought in its wake such things as gramophones, dinner jackets, cocktails, sports cars, nightclubs and jazz. Cocktail parties became fashionable, and buffet dinners replaced the formal dinners of the past. Meals were held later than ever before. Staying at Fort Belvedere, country home of the Prince of Wales, in 1930, Diana Cooper wrote to Conrad Russell: ‘Everything is a few hours later than in other places. (Perhaps it’s American time.) A splendid tea arrived at 6.30. Dinner was at 10. Emerald (Cunard) arrived
irects all the Forum’s activities as a global platform for knowledge exchange, dissemination of research results, and best practices. He has more than 20 years of experience in planning, executing, and managing agricultural research and development programs. Mauricio also serves as the Capacity Development Officer of the FAO Right to Food Team.

Gizane Ribeiro de Santana is an Assistant Professor at the Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Recôncavo of Bahia, Brazil. She received a degree in Nutrition from the Federal University of Bahia (2006), and has a Masters degree in Health, Environment and Labor (2004) from the Federal University of Bahia. She is member of the Group of Researches and Studies in Collective Catering (Grupo de Estudos e Pesquisas em Alimentafäo Coletiva), Federal University of Bahia, and has research experience in this area and in the field of public health. Santana is the author of the article, “O Nutricionista como Promotor de Saúde em Unidades de Alimentação e Nutrição: Dificuldades e Desafios do Fazer” (2011) and the book chapter “Alimentos de rua na Bahia: o perfil do consumidor em Salvador e a caracterização do comércio em Mutuípe” (2008).

Sandra Maria Chaves dos Santos is an Associate Professor at the School of Nutrition, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil. She received a degree in Nutrition from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (1978), a Masters in Public Health (1989), and a Doctoral degree in Public Administration (2001) from the Federal University of Bahia. She is the Head of the Research Group on Nutrition and Public Policies, Federal University of Bahia, and has long-standing research experience in the field of monitoring and evaluating food and nutrition security policies and programs. She has also been a representative member of the National Brazilian Council of Food Nutrition and Security. Santos has authored numerous articles, among which are “Programas de transferência de renda no Brasil: um estudo multidimensional da implementação do Bolsa Escola, Bolsa Alimentação e Cartão Alimentação” (2011), “Avaliação do programa Bolsa Família em municípios de baixo índice de Desenvolvimento Humano e cumprimento de condicionalidades de saúde (2011), “Street food and intervention: strategies and proposals to the developing world” (2009), and the book chapter ”Alimentos de rua na Bahia: o perfil do consumidor em Salvador e a caracterização do comércio em Mutuípe“ (2008).

Muhammad Shahrim Abdul Karim is an Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Food Service and Management, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia. His research interests include food and culture, culinary tourism, food habits, and consumer behavior. He received a BS in Hotel and Restaurant Management from New York University, an MBA from Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia, and a PhD in hospitality and tourism from Oklahoma State University, USA.

Edleuza Oliveira Silva is an Assistant Professor at the Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Reconcavo of Bahia, Brazil. She received a degree in Nutrition from the Federal University of Bahia (1997), and has a Masters degree in Community Health (2004) from the Federal University of Bahia. She has research experience in the fields of food and nutrition security, school feeding, and health surveillance. Silva has authored many articles, among which are “Formação para merendeiras: uma proposta metodológica aplicada em escolas estaduais atendidas pelo Programa Nacional de Alimentação Escolar, Salvador, Bahia” (2011), “Programa nacional de alimentação escolar: há segurança na produção de alimentos em escolas de Salvador (Bahia)?” (2010), “Street food and intervention: strategies and proposals to the developing world” (2009), and “Comida de rua: um espaço para estudo na Universidade Federal da Bahia” (2003).

Luisa Fernanda Tobar Vargas, ND, MSc, Social Community Psychology and Biological Sciences, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá DC, Colombia, is a full-time Assistant Professor of the Public Nutrition Area, and Researcher of the Food, Nutrition and Health Group (Line of food and nutritional safety, nutrition and healthy lifestyles) at the Science Faculty of Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. She is the author ofseveral books, including Los Niños Indígenas Wayúu del Desierto. Cultura y Situación Alimentaria and Estado Alimentario y Nutricional de Comunidades Indígenas y Poblaciones Afrocolombianas, scientific articles, and the chapter “Aspectos Nutricionales y Alimentarios de las Comunidades Indigenas Colombianas” in Geografía Humana de Colombia—Variación Biológica y Cultural en Colombia.

Acknowledgments

We hereby acknowledge the following people for their precious scientific contributions to this book: Elisabeth A. Abergel, Department of Sociology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Cana

[collapse]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *