Hayden Cooks by Hayden Quinn – ISBN: B006J24YXM

  • Full Title: Hayden Cooks: Summer
  • Autor: Hayden Quinn
  • Print Length: 97 pages
  • Publisher: Murdoch Books
  • Publication Date: December 1, 2011
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: B006J24YXM
  • ISBN-13: 
  • Download File Format | Size: epub | 7,96 Mb
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Fresh from his incredible journey on ‘MasterChef’, Hayden Quinn shares his favourite summer dishes.

‘This is the first instalment of my three-part eBook, and it tells the story of my favourite summer dishes – where they have come from and why they are special to me. They are all simple to create and all have fresh, punchy summer flavours – to go with any outdoor entertaining you may be doing while the sun is shining. These recipes, like most of my meals, are best shared with friends. So get together this summer, do some cooking and share some stories. Live life, eat well, travel far.’ – Hayden Quinn

 

Editorial Reviews

 

Keywords

ION

CONTENTS

DEDICATION

INTRODUCTION

1. BACK TO BASICS BASIC RISOTTO

CARAMELIZED ONIONS

BASIC BLANCHED VEGETABLES

OVEN-ROASTED TOMATOES

ROASTED GARLIC

SHALLOT CONFIT

FRESH PASTA DOUGH

VINAIGRETTES SHERRY TAPENADE VINAIGRETTE

MUSTARD VINAIGRETTE

WHITE BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE

TOMATO VINAIGRETTE

RED WINE VINAIGRETTE

CHICKEN STOCK

2. SAUCES, MARINADES, AND OTHER FLAVOR SECRETS MARINARA SAUCE

HERB PESTO

SWEET AND SPICY CHILI OIL

GREEN OLIVE RELISH

FRESH TOMATO SAUCE

EASY COMPOUND LEMON-PEPPER BUTTER

ALL-AROUND MUSTARD SAUCE

GRAPEFRUIT GASTRIQUE

MALT VINEGAR AIOLI

ROSEMARY ANCHOVY RUB

CURRY GOLDEN RAISIN SAUCE

SWEET SUMMER CORN SAUCE

CHERMOULA

3. FIRST IMPRESSIONS EGGPLANT CAPONATA

GAZPACHO

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP

MIXED MARINATED OLIVES

SHRIMP COCKTAIL WITH HOMEMADE SAUCE

FAST GUACAMOLE

CRABMEAT CROSTINI

GOAT CHEESE FLAN

SPINACH-FETA PIES

4. MORE THAN A SALAD CAESAR SALAD WITH HOMEMADE BUTTER CROUTONS CAESAR DRESSING

BEET SALAD WITH BEET VINAIGRETTE BEET VINAIGRETTE

KALE AND FARRO SALAD WITH AGED GOAT CHEESE

CUCUMBER, DILL, AND YOGURT SALAD

ASPARAGUS SALAD WITH PARMESAN

“ITALIAN” SALAD

CORN AND BLACK BEAN SALAD

AVOCADO AND BACON SALAD WITH JALAPEÑO–BACON FAT DRESSING

GRILLED ZUCCHINI AND TOMATO PANZANELLA SALAD

LOBSTER SALAD

5. WHAT’S FOR DINNER? “PORK ON PORK” CHOPS

SPINACH, POTATO, AND RICOTTA EGG WHITE FRITTATA

LAMB BURGERS WITH FRESH MINT YOGURT

“LUSTY” LEMON CHICKEN

LENTIL SOUP

SALMON WITH PEAS, PEARL ONIONS, AND MINT

BARLEY-STUFFED PEPPERS

GRILLED STEAK WITH HERB BUTTER

CORNMEAL-CRUSTED CHICKEN THIGHS WITH JAMAICAN SPICE

TOASTED QUINOA SOUP

KALE AND TOMATO STEW

PAN-SEARED TROUT WITH HORSERADISH CREAM

6. LOW AND SLOW JERSEY SUNDAY MEATBALLS

POP’S BEER-BRAISED BOLD BEEF STEW

CHICKEN FRICASSEE

PULLED PORK SANDWICHES

PUERTO RICAN PERNIL

TURKEY CHILI

WINTER DUCK LEG BRAISE

POTATO-KALE SOUP

BEEF SHORT RIBS

CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE

7. SIDES ROASTED CAULIFLOWER

SMASHED YUKON GOLD POTATOES

GREEN BEANS WITH TOASTED ALMONDS

CORNBREAD AND CHALLAH STUFFING

OLIVE OIL MASHED POTATOES

GIARDINIERA

NO-NONSENSE COLESLAW

BROCCOLINI WITH LEMON AND ROSEMARY

ORZO PASTA SALAD

MEDITERRANEAN POTATO SALAD

ROOT VEGETABLE PUREE

CLASSIC CREAMED SPINACH

8. THE SCARY STUFF MARINATED ARTICHOKES

OVEN-ROASTED LOBSTERS

HEARTY GNOCCHI

BUTTERMILK BISCUITS

SEARED SCALLOPS

CORN SOUFFLÉ

CREPES: SAVORY OR SWEET

POACHED ARCTIC CHAR

ARANCINE

CRISPY SPAETZLE WITH ROASTED SUNCHOKES

EASY COQ AU VIN

HERB-STUFFED WHOLE FISH

SCALLOP “CEVICHE”

DUCK BREAST WITH PINE NUT RELISH

9. FOR YOUR SWEET TOOTH ANGEL FOOD CAKE

DEEP-DISH APPLE-RHUBARB PIE

SUMMER BERRY FRUIT CRUMBLE

COCONUT MACAROONS

IMPRESSIVE DARK CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

YOGURT PANNA COTTA WITH DRIED CRANBERRY AND GRAPE COMPOTE

SHORTBREAD COOKIES WITH LEMON CURD

COCOA CARROT CAKE WITH CREAM CHEESE ICING

RICE PUDDING IS THE CURE!

RANGER COOKIES

CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES

PEANUT BUTTER BLONDIES

MENUS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

INDEX

CREDITS

COPYRIGHT

ABOUT THE PUBLISHER

INTRODUCTION

When I stand in my kitchen at the Empire Diner, I’m surrounded by frenzied line cooks and servers at the pass frantically looking for orders. I’m enveloped by the unforgiving heat of an arsenal of burners, grills, and convection ovens, all fired up at once. My ears are besieged by the distinct kitchen noise—the dishwasher’s constant whir, empty glasses clanking, silverware and plates rattling onto trays and into sinks, shouts of line cooks coordinating the timing of dishes, and the low din of seated diners. Standing there, I feel the aches and pains of joints that continue to stand by me, despite the years of unmerciful wear and tear I’ve put them through. They tell the story of a life filled with twelve- to fifteen-hour days that bleed into nights and sometimes straight into mornings.

There’s no doubt about it, life as a restaurant chef is an utter assault on the senses. But when there’s a rare break in service—a stolen moment to wipe the sweat from my brow, check the time, and breathe—I always look to the diners for whom it’s all for. I see a table of four eagerly await their meals while laughing over a shared bottle of wine. A seated guest looks up to his waiter in a moment of counsel. My eyes pass over the empty plates left behind by satisfied eaters. I see regulars telling neighborhood stories at the bar. And sometimes, just sometimes, I’m lucky enough to tune in at just the moment that a smile erupts in approval of a first bite. And in these moments the pandemonium fades to the background and I am at peace, completely in my element, blissfully in the zone as I pump out orders. Recharge
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er’s

CENTRAL

BREWERIES

Blue Heron Brewpub

Bull Falls Brewery

Central Waters Brewery

Kozy Yak Brewery

Minocqua Brewing Co.

O’so Brewing

Pigeon River Brewing Company

Red Eye Brewing Company

Rocky Reef

Sawmill Brewing Co.

Stevens Point Brewery

Tribute Brewing

BEER BARS

Guu’s on Main

Milwaukee Burger Co.

NORTHWEST

BREWERIES

Angry Minnow

Barley John’s Brewing

Bloomer Brewing Company

Bobtown Brewhouse and Grill

The Brewing Projekt

Brewster Bros. Brewing Co. and Chippewa River Distillery

Dave’s BrewFarm

Leinenkugel

K Point Brewery

Lazy Monk Brewing

Lucette Brewing Company

Moonridge Brewing Co.

Northwoods Brewpub

Oliphant Brewing

Pitchfork Brewery

Real Deal Brewing

Rush River Brewing

Sand Creek Brewing

South Shore Brewery/Deep Water Grille

Spring Valley Golf Course

Thirsty Pagan

Valkyrie Brewing

BEER BARS

Casanova Liquors

The Fire House

The Oxbow Hotel and The Lakely

GREEN BAY

BREWERIES

Ahnapee Brewing

Badger State Brewing

Copper State Brewing

Door County Brewing

Forgotten Fire Brewery

Hinterland

Leatherhead Brewing Co.

Rail House Restaurant and Brew Pub

Stillmank Brewing Co.

Titletown Brewing Co.

Shipwrecked Brew Pub

Starboard Brewing Company

BEER BARS

Bier Zot

Ned Kelly’s Pub

MULTILOCATION

BREWPUBS

Granite City Food and Brewery

Great Dane Pub and Brewing Co.

Legends Brewhouse and Eatery

Legends De Pere

Milwaukee Ale House Grafton

Rock Bottom Brewery

Water Street Brewery

BEER BARS

Mr. Brews Taphouse

ANNUAL EVENTS

PUB CRAWLS

Walker’s Point, Milwaukee, Pub Crawl

Riverwest, Milwaukee, Pub Crawl

Green Bay Pub Crawl

Madison 53704 Pub Crawl

RESTAURANTS WITH BEER RELATIONSHIPS

MILWAUKEE

Ale Asylum Riverhouse

Jackson’s Blue Ribbon Pub

Point Burger Bar

Sprecher Restaurant and Pub

BEER GARDENS

MILWAUKEE

Croatian Park Beer Garden

Estabrook Park Beer Garden

The Landing at Hoyt Park

Humboldt Park Beer Garden by St. Francis Brewing

Traveling Beer Gardens with Sprecher Brewing Co.

South Shore Terrace

Hubbard Park Beer Garden

MADISON

Memorial Union Terrace

TOURS

Hop Head Tours

Fun Beer Tours Milwaukee

Milwaukee Food and City Tours

Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery

Brewhouse Inn and Suites

The Pabst Mansion

Old World Wisconsin

Forest Home Cemetery

The Milwaukee County Historical Society

The Beerline Bike Trail

Brewers Hill

The Brown Bottle

HOME BREW STORES

Brew and Grow

Brewmasters Brewing Supplies

Bull Falls Brew Depot

Farmhouse Brewing Supply

House of Homebrews

Northern Brewer

Point Brew Supply

The Purple Foot

Tiki Hut Home Brew Supplies

U Brew University

U Brew Milwaukee

Windriver Brewing Co.

Wine and Hop Shop

IN THE KITCHEN

IPA Spinach Artichoke Dip with French Bread

Wisconsin Belgian Red Chocolate Sauce

Ale and Cheese Soup

INTRODUCTION

Wisconsin, you’re pretty.

It’s easy to dismiss the state as being only as great as Milwaukee, its largest city, but that discounts its other attributes—clean air, nearly 500,000 acres of state forests, and 15,074 lakes.

Once you look at Wisconsin in its entirety, once you drive it, you recognize that there’s more going on here than expected. Lake Michigan hugs the eastern coastline. Lake Superior laps at the shores of its most northern border. A road trip along the western edge of the state follows the Mississippi all the way to Iowa.

In between are miles of verdant farmland dotted with big and small communities. The differences are sometimes stark. No one would confuse Milwaukee with, say, Monroe. But they have one thing in common—beer.

I’ve lived in this state for twenty-three years and the journey to its more than 150 breweries (give or take a few) still surprised me. The adventure launched at the tip of Wisconsin where the lupine is as colorful as the residents and streets are marked with picket-fence arrows instead of road signs.

The first night’s meal—set al fresco—was the result of a tip from another brewery visitor. Freehands Farm isn’t the kind of place a newcomer would know about on his own. And it took a handful of phone calls to find it through street construction. The payoff of fine dining in a bucolic setting was the perfect end to a day of exploration.

There were moments in my beer travels that made me laugh out loud—the woman in a fedora singing Frank Sinatra tunes into a karaoke machine and the search for a brewery on a hidden golf course that circled into an apartment complex where the only option was to wave to the stranger sunbathing in a lawn chair. There were a few impromptu, behind-the-scenes tours of breweries so small
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iciotti co’ ‘a ‘innìvia ereno cari.

Poi bucaletti, fatti venire apposta

vivi vivi ‘n dispenza a li Chiavari

da lo compare, là, de quella posta

mia de bottega, ch ’i maneggia ‘affari.

Poi uva, frutti secchi e moscardini4.

E certo vino, ohé! … cért’acquavita,

fss…! che me ne scolai tre bicchierini!

… Café… e mai pèjo! e così s’è assopita

‘sta stimana… e ce ne destini

cent’altri Dio, se ce vorà da’ vita.

Crescenzo Del Monte

2. Crescenzo Del Monte, Sonetti giudaico-romaneschi sonetti romaneschi prose e versioni, Giuntina, Firenze, 2007, p. 330. Il sonetto «Il pranzo del Sabato» porta la data del 23 agosto 1925.

3. Vitella da latte.

4. Dolce casalingo.

A partire dalla tavola

Si vive per mangiare o si mangia per vivere?

Ognuno di noi, di fronte a una tavola imbandita, può riconoscersi nell’una o nell’altra opzione, ma non può rinunciare al cibo; anzi con il cibo e con la tavola deve confrontarsi ogni giorno della sua vita in modo consapevole o anche inconsapevole.

Comunque ci si ponga, il cibo parla di noi, del nostro essere gli uomini che siamo, della nostra salute, della nostra cultura, della nostra visione del mondo, del nostro rapporto con gli altri esseri viventi e, eventualmente, anche della nostra fede.

C’è chi sostiene che il cibo sia essenzialmente ciò che si mangia in quanto «buono da mangiare»; chi ritiene, invece, che il cibo sia prima di tutto qualcosa di simbolico «buono da pensare» e chi, ancora, ipotizza che sia l’una e l’altra cosa, dando la preminenza all’uno o all’altro aspetto a seconda dell’approccio antropologico, etnologico o sociologico seguito.

Che cos’è, allora, il cibo?

Per Carlo Petrini, fondatore di Slow Food, il cibo non è il semplice nutrirsi, per istinto biologico o compulsiva voglia, e non è solamente il prodotto dell’arte del cucinare (ars coquinaria o arte culinaria), ma è un elemento, legato a luoghi, sapienza antica e cultura, determinante nella definizione dell’identità umana:

Il cibo è il principale fattore di definizione dell’identità umana, poiché ciò che mangiamo è sempre un prodotto culturale. Se accettiamo una contrapposizione concettuale tra Natura e Cultura (come tra ciò che è naturale e ciò che è artificiale), il cibo è la risultante di una serie di processi (culturali, nel senso che introducono elementi artificiali nella naturalità delle cose) che lo trasformano da base completamente naturale (la materia prima) a prodotto di una cultura (ciò che si mangia).5

Ci si può chiedere perché ci sia una così grande varietà di cibi (e di cucine) nel mondo e perché un gruppo umano utilizzi un determinato cibo mentre un altro lo rifiuta. La risposta non è univoca perché diverse possono essere le modalità di indagine in un arco di possibilità che va dal semplice influsso dell’ambiente al condizionamento simbolico-religioso.

Marvin Harris, ad esempio, ritiene che i fattori nutritivi siano di gran lunga più determinanti di quelli simbolici e che la scelta, in buona parte, sia frutto di un’attenta valutazione dell’uso corretto delle risorse:

[…] le differenze sostanziali tra le cucine del mondo si possono fare risalire ai condizionamenti ambientali e alle diverse possibilità offerte dalle diverse zone. Per esempio, […] le cucine che ricorrono maggiormente alla carne si accompagnano a una densità demografica relativamente bassa e alla presenza di terre non strettamente necessarie, o inadatte, alla coltivazione. All’opposto, le cucine che ricorrono maggiormente ai vegetali si accompagnano a un’elevata densità demografica, con popolazioni il cui habitat e la cui tecnologia per la produzione del cibo non possono sostenere l’allevamento di animali da carne senza ridurre la quantità di calorie e di proteine disponibili per l’uomo. Nel caso dell’India […] la scarsa praticabilità in termini ambientali, dell’allevamento di animali da carne supera a tal punto i vantaggi nutritivi del consumo di carne che questa finisce per essere evitata: diventa cioè cattiva da mangiare e, pertanto,cattiva da pensare.6

Harris può essere nel vero, ma quello che emerge nel sistema alimentare umano è la stretta e necessaria relazione tra mangiare e pensare, tra il nutrire lo stomaco “di gruppo” e la mentalità “di gruppo”. Il cibo, qualunque sia la modalità di scelta, si carica sempre di valenze simboliche e culturali che danno forza e senso a un determinato regime alimentare.

Pertanto, per l’uomo il mangiare non non è solo l’atto del nutrirsi, ma è l’insieme degli usi, dei significati, dei valori e delle procedure che i diversi gruppi umani hanno elaborato e sedimentato, nel tempo e alle diverse latitudini, per soddisfare le esigenze alimentari e, insieme, per determinare l’identità personale e di gruppo da una parte, e per separare la propria identità da quella degli altri e di altri gruppi. Diviene, come sostiene Roland Barthes, un sistema semiologico di significazione, fondato, come ogni sist
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bland: If it’s undersalted, it is bland.

Undersalting can also result in an imbalance with the other seasonings in a dish. If, for example, you’ve undersalted a dish containing hot spices and/or chiles, you will feel the heat but you won’t necessarily experience the full round warmth of the hot ingredient, and heat alone is not necessarily pleasant. In an undersalted dish, garlic can taste merely sharp instead of flavorful. If there are lots of pungent, vivid herbs in, say, an undersalted Greek pie, they’ll dominate rather than finish or accent the flavors. Salt has a tempering effect that’s important in cooking.

Fresh Herbs

If you have access to sun and a space for a few simple pots, I urge you to grow some of your own herbs, such as thyme, mint, sage, and tarragon. You rarely need all the thyme and sage that comes in the expensive packages available at the supermarket (on the other hand, you may need more mint than comes in the packages); it’s far easier to grow them whether you live in the country or the city. When I lived in Paris I grew thyme, sage, basil, mint, chives, and tarragon in pots on my balcony. In California they’re still in pots (except the tarragon and thyme, which thrive in my small garden) outside by my garden. Sage, thyme, and rosemary require very little water (that’s why they’re so popular in the Mediterranean, where the climate can be very hot and dry). Rosemary is a little trickier to grow because it’s easy to kill it by overwatering, but once you have a bush you’ll never need to buy it again (assuming you don’t live in a cold area, like New England).

PANTRY CHECKLIST

THESE ARE THE FOODS I TRY to always keep in stock. They will allow you to make any of the template recipes in this book. Keep grains, beans, and flours double-sealed in plastic bags, or in plastic storage containers or jars.

Dry goods to keep on shelves, preferably away from light

Rice, including Arborio rice

Other grains (see Chapter 7 for specific grains)

Dried beans (such as black beans, white beans, lima beans, borlottis, pintos, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, and heirlooms like scarlet runners or Christmas limas; see Chapters 2, 10, and 13)

Canned beans (I recommend chickpeas and white beans)

Lentils

Dried pasta, including soup pasta and no-boil lasagna noodles

Couscous

Canned tomatoes (both 14.5-ounce and 28-ounce)

Tomato paste (tubes are convenient; refrigerate after opening; if you buy cans, once open, spoon out what you don’t use by the tablespoon, wrap in plastic, and freeze)

Buckwheat noodles (soba)

Rice noodles (sometimes called rice sticks)

Soy sauce (can also keep in the refrigerator)

Dried shiitake and/or porcini mushrooms

Kombu seaweed

Salt

Polenta

Whole wheat flour

Unbleached all-purpose flour

Cornstarch or arrowroot (for stir-fries)

Canned chipotles (transfer to a jar and refrigerate once opened)

Red wine vinegar or sherry vinegar (sherry vinegar is my go-to vinegar)

Balsamic vinegar

Seasoned rice vinegar

Sugar

Honey

OILS

Extra virgin olive oil (store in a cool, dark place but not in the refrigerator)

Sunflower or grapeseed oil (refrigerate once opened)

Peanut oil (refrigerate once opened; optional)

Dark sesame oil (refrigerate once opened)

Walnut oil (refrigerate once opened)

DRIED HERBS (I use fresh more often but these are the ones you should keep in the cupboard)

Bay leaves

Oregano

Thyme

SPICES (can be stored in the pantry, but I keep mine in the freezer; they stay fresh much longer that way)

Allspice

Black pepper

Caraway seeds

Cayenne

Chili powder

Cinnamon and cinnamon sticks

Cloves

Coriander seeds

Cumin seeds

Curry powder

Ground ginger

Ground sumac

Nigella seeds

Paprika

Red pepper flakes

Saffron

Star anise

Vegetable bins (not refrigerated)

Onions

Garlic

Shallots

Refrigerator

Parmesan rinds (for flavoring soups and beans; can also keep in freezer)

Parmesan (block, not grated; preferably Parmigiano Reggiano)

Firm tofu

Eggs

Gruyère

Feta

Goat cheese

A melting cheese such as Monterey Jack or cheddar

Butter

Yogurt

Shao-hsing rice wine or dry sherry (for stir-fries)

Dry white wine such as pinot grigio or sauvignon blanc

Bottled salsa or homemade salsa

Harissa

Aromatics and produce used regularly and that keep well: ginger, carrots, celery, lemons, limes

Freezer

Breadcrumbs

Vegetable stock

Cooked grains

Corn tortillas

Marinara sauce

Wilted greens

Peas

Edamame

Walnuts

Herbs to grow in pots or in your garden if you can

Thyme

Tarragon

Chives

Mint

Rosemary

Sage

CHAPTER ONE

The Building Blocks: Basic Recipes

THESE ARE THE BASIC, mostly vegetable preparations that I use most ofte
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them to the pan. Bring the soup to the boil, then simmer gently for about 40 minutes or until the chestnuts are tender and cooked. Take out some cooked chestnuts to use as a garnish, remove the thyme and bay leaves, then blitz the soup in a blender or food processor until smooth. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Using a melon baller, scoop out little balls of apple from the remaining halves. Melt the butter in a small pan, add the apple balls and sprinkle them with the sugar. Toss briefly until lightly glazed.

To serve, put a few cooked chestnuts and apple balls in each bowl, pour in some soup, then drizzle with a little olive oil, if you like.

Soupe aux abattis

Giblet soup

Tasty, warming and filling, this soup is made with parts of the chicken that some people would throw away. Not in France though! We like to use every bit of the bird.

serves 6

3 chicken necks, skinned

3 chicken gizzards

6 chicken wings, including tips

6 cockscombs

6 chicken livers

6 chicken hearts

3 tbsp unsalted butter

olive oil

1 tbsp flour

1 litre chicken stock (see here)

500ml water

1 bouquet garni, made up of thyme, bay leaf, parsley stalks and rosemary (see here)

2 celery sticks, sliced

3 tbsp cooked long-grain rice

salt

black pepper

Cut each chicken neck into 3 pieces and the gizzards in half. Trim the thickest part of each wing to reveal the bone by pushing down the meat so it resembles a lollipop and keep these for later. Trim the rest of the giblets as necessary.

Heat a tablespoon of the butter with a little drizzle of oil in a large saucepan and fry the necks, gizzards, wing tips and combs. Sprinkle in the flour and stir well until brown, then pour in the stock and 500ml of water. Add the bouquet garni and seasoning and simmer for an hour or until all the meat is tender. Pass the soup through a strainer and keep warm.

Pick the meat off the necks and slice the gizzards and combs. Heat a tablespoon of butter in a small pan and gently cook the sliced celery until tender. Fry the livers, hearts and wing lollipops in the rest of the butter and a little oil until golden, then season.

Add the cooked rice to the soup and warm through. Serve the soup in deep plates with the roughly chopped meat.

Soupe de lièvre

Hare soup

Even non-game lovers will enjoy this meaty, wholesome soup. Some versions contain barley, but I think that the dumplings hit the spot and make this soup a hearty meal in itself.

Serves 4

2 shoulders, neck and ribcage of a hare

1 hare’s leg

1 hare’s heart and liver

vegetable oil

1 carrot, peeled and chopped

1 celery stick, chopped

1 white onion, peeled and chopped

1 x 30g slice of smoked bacon, chopped

1 potato, peeled and chopped

1 bouquet garni, made up of thyme, bay leaf , parsley stalks and rosemary (see here)

2 litres chicken stock (see here)

2 tbsp cold unsalted butter

4 tbsp port

salt

black pepper

Dumplings

100g self-raising flour

60g suet

2 tbsp cold water

2 tbsp chopped flatleaf parsley

salt

black pepper

Season the hare meat. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a large saucepan and brown all the meat, except the heart and liver, over a high heat. Add the carrot, celery, onion, bacon and potato and cook gently for 10 minutes. Add the bouquet garni and the stock, then simmer very gently for 2 hours – the soup should barely bubble. Skim the surface regularly and top up with hot water if necessary.

Take out the hare leg, strip off the meat and dice it. Put this in a bowl with a little of the soup to keep it warm and moist and set aside. Add the liver and heart to the pan and simmer the soup for another 20 minutes. Strain the soup through a fine sieve, then pick off as much meat from the bones as you can. Purée the meat, heart and liver with a drop of the soup and keep warm.

Bring the soup back to the boil, then whisk in the cold butter, puréed meat and the port. Serve in bowls with the diced leg meat and dumplings.

dumplings

Put the flour, suet and seasoning in a bowl and gradually bring them together with the 2 tablespoons of water. Add the chopped parsley andknead the dough like bread until it is soft but not sticky.

Leave the dough to rest in the fridge for 20 minutes, then roll it into bite-sized balls. Bring a pan of salted water to the boil, drop in the dumplings and cook for 7–8 minutes until swollen.

Consommé de boeuf à la royale

Beef consommé with royal garnish

Gold leaf is the classic garnish for this – the ‘royale’ touch on top of the little custards served in the consommé. And if you re
as this book was about to go to press: “Over the many years that there have been numerous accounts of that time frame, John’s posture has and continues to be that of not dignifying them with any sort of response; it would not serve a meaningful purpose other than giving a false platform to get attention. Those events are a part of history, they cannot be relived and those who were a part of creating the historical events of that era know the truth. Debating on any level, for John, would be counter-productive to serve a purpose for whoever’s views are not on point. With all that being said, John sends his appreciation for your concerns of misgivings and wanting to give him a voice, but it’s really not his style, he prefers to remain silent and let the records speak for themselves.” Regardless, Johnny Nash has my utmost respect and admiration for his incredibly important work in exposing reggae to the masses and making vital contributions that molded Bob and the Wailers into finest quality international entertainers.

There has never been an artist like Bob Marley, “the artist of the century.” His works are more popular than ever, with Forbes magazine listing him at number five among the highest-earning dead celebrities for 2014. Bob was psychic, and he declared that his work would last forever. It was just one of his many prophecies, some of which have yet to manifest. His abilities were recognized in 1976 by the Jamaican poet and author Geoffrey Philp, who wrote about meeting Bob for the first time at the Mona Heights Community Center in Kingston and reconfirmed them to me at a Marley seminar in Florida in 2015: “When I got there Bob was sitting under an acacia tree. I walked up to him, introduced myself and he told me to sit down. This was the first time I had experienced Bob’s so-called psychic ability because he began to tell me things about my life that no one else—not even my mother—knew about me. I still don’t remember the details because I was in a state of shock. I just couldn’t believe that anyone upon meeting me within the space of five minutes could have told me so much about my life.”

Here, now, his closest friends and associates tell you about the life of the Bob they encountered. As one of the early readers of this manuscript observed, “After reading this I feel like I really know the man.” My hope is that you will too.

—Echo Park, L.A.,

July 2016

SO MUCH THINGS TO SAY

CHAPTER 1

Where Is My Mother?

R

OGER STEFFENS: Cedella Malcolm Marley Booker, Bob Marley’s mother, was eighteen at the time of his birth. Her white husband, born in Clarendon, Jamaica, was named Norval Marley. He was around sixty-four when Nesta Robert Marley was born on February 6, 1945, in a tiny rural village called Nine Mile, which had no electricity or running water. Christopher Marley, a member of the white Marley family, has spent years tracing Bob’s bloodline and has been sharing his research with me as new discoveries come to light, debunking many of the false claims that continue to this day, including the idea that Norval was born in England and was an army officer.

CHRISTOPHER MARLEY: Bob’s father was Norval Sinclair Marley, born to a British father and a “colored” mother. Norval was not a “sea captain,” nor was he a “quartermaster” or “captain” or “officer in the British Army.” He was a “ferro-cement engineer.” His British Army discharge papers show that he worked in various “labour corps” in the UK during the First World War and was discharged as a private. He did not see active service on the battlefield. Norval Marley’s family was not Syrian, as has been suggested. He was a restless, wandering man. He traveled and worked all over the world at a time when travel was not the simple thing it is today—to Cuba, the UK, Nigeria and South Africa.

He was supervising the subdivision of some rural land in Saint Ann Parish for war veteran housing when he married eighteen-year-old Cedella Malcolm, whom he had got pregnant. He provided little financial support and seldom saw her and their son. He died of a heart attack in 1955, stone broke and living off an eight-shilling-a-week army pension (about US$1.20).

Norval was seriously unstable, to put it mildly. The rejection of Bob by the Marley family was a rejection of Norval.

CEDELLA BOOKER: Norval was living in Nine Mile at the time, watching the lands that the government gave people—certain amount of land to work on during the war. He was like an overseer.

ROGER STEFFENS: If there was any true direction in Bob’s earliest years, it would come from his grandfather Omariah, who was known locally as a myalman—a benevolent practitioner of healing arts—as opposed to an obeahman, whose darker intentions cast fear into the hearts of superstitious country folk. Omariah was reported to have fathered as many as thirty children.

CEDELLA

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