Hummingbird Bakery Mother’s and Father’s Day Treats by Tarek Malouf [azw3 | 3,25 Mb] ISBN: B00HTW77V2

  • Full Title: Hummingbird Bakery Mother’s and Father’s Day Treats: An Extract from Cake Days
  • Autor: Tarek Malouf
  • Print Length: 52 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate
  • Publication Date: February 27, 2014
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: B00HTW77V2
  • ISBN-13: 
  • Download File Format | Size: azw3 | 3,25 Mb
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This is an extract from the bestselling Cake Days by The Hummingbird Bakery.

From pretty Rose Cupcakes or Pistachio Whoopie Pies, to an indulgent Chocolate Guinness Cake or Boston Cream Cupcakes, this is a scrumptious collection of treats, perfect for any special Mum or Dad.

 

Editorial Reviews

 

Keywords

ndice Kumai

Meet Our Chefs . . .

1 Power Breakfasts

2 Simple Starters

3 Lightened-Up Carbs

4 Dinner Tonight

5 Quick Chicken

6 Family Favorites

7 Classic Desserts

Acknowledgments

Index

About the Authors

Credits

Copyright

About the Publisher

Foreword

Candice Kumai

When I was asked to cook on the premiere season of what became the hit show Recipe Rehab on ABC stations, my initial reaction was; “Why hadn’t anyone produced a show like this before!?” Finally, there was a TV program that shared not only a fresh perspective on delicious, satisfying meals created by real chefs, but also provided a huge wake-up call about the kinds of (unhealthy) foods we are feeding our families on a daily basis.

We’ve all heard the statistics about the health crisis facing Americans: About two-thirds of the adult population is classified as overweight or obese, and among our children, approximately one in three kids and teens is overweight or obese. Even more disturbing is the fact that, according to a recent study, the number of obese adults is on track to increase dramatically over the next twenty years. It’s clear that this is a complex problem that will require a number of approaches to solve, from changes in public policy to changes in our attitudes and lifestyles. But one change we can all implement right now is to spend a little more of our time cooking and eating healthy meals at home.

It has been shown that shared family meals have a number of healthy benefits: families who cook at home and eat together are known to eat more fruits and vegetables, eat fewer fried foods and junk foods, and drink less soda than other families. And kids who eat at home with their families have a lower body mass index (BMI) than those who don’t—they also perform better in school!

What I love about Recipe Rehab is that it gives everyone in America the power to create incredible-tasting, restaurant-quality foods that are also good for them, right in his or her own kitchen. Each week, two celebrity chefs face off in a competition to transform a family’s favorite unhealthy, high-calorie dish into something that tastes just as delicious, but is much healthier. And when I say the chefs face off, I’m not kidding—we are in it to win it! Here’s the lineup of my fierce competitors, whose recipes you will soon be preparing and eating (for more information on these amazing chefs, turn to page viii): Spike Mendelsohn, Aida Mollenkamp, Scott Leibfried, Govind Armstrong, Jet Tila, Jill Davie, Daniel Green, Laura Vitale, Calvin Harris, Jaden Hair, and Mareya Ibrahim.

We are lucky to have an amazingly talented group of notable chefs, food writers, and cooks on this show (as well as on RecipeRehab.com and in this book)! We’ve all signed on to be a part of the Recipe Rehab project because we care deeply about the health and wellness issues facing Americans. As culinary professionals, we feel that it is our duty to share the knowledge and skills we’ve learned in the kitchen through years of hard work and practice to help home cooks find “small step” solutions they can implement little by little, leading to big payoffs down the road for themselves and their families. With Recipe Rehab, we’re able to give people the tools and information they need to create dishes they can feel good about cooking any night of the week.

We’ve also got you covered online—and on the go—with RecipeRehab.com. Inspired by the book, the site caters to anyone looking for easy, accessible ways to eat healthier. With tons of chef tips, simple swaps, how-to videos, and more, RecipeRehab.com makes it easier than ever for home cooks to get healthy without skipping all their favorite foods. We also believe that health should never be an inconvenience—breakfast on the go or last-minute weeknight dinners can be fast, delicious, and still good for the whole family.

All of the recipes in this book were created by real chefs and trained professionals who know a thing or two about how to make food taste delicious and look beautiful, and how to translate “chef-y” recipes into easy-to-master meals for anyone cooking at home.

For example, Chef Laura Vitale’s French Toast Casserole is the perfect Sunday-morning breakfast for a crowd. It can be prepared the night before, so you just pop it in the oven in the morning and, voilà—a warm, wholesome breakfast for only 160 calories per serving. And then there’s Chef Jill Davis’s “Better than Takeout” Orange Chicken, an amazing weeknight dinner option that you can whip together in a mere thirty minutes (less time than it takes for your local Chinese joint to deliver!), and offers plenty of flavor and nutrition for under 500 calories. And of course, there’s always room for dessert. Chef Spike Mendelsohn will show you how to make his flaky, delicious Phyllo Apple Cups, which take fifteen minutes to bake and will satisfy your apple pie cravings fo
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r as a horse, driver, and wagon could venture from and return to the brewery in a day.

Directory ads, like this 1858 example from Adam Lemp, St. Louis, are some of the few breweriana items from this period that can still be found.

Thus, despite the huge number of breweries in America by 1860 (it has been estimated that there were more than twelve hundred), no breweriana exists for most of them. Neighborhood breweries saw little need to advertise, and any cooperage or equipment they used, even if it has survived, typically bears no inscription.

An exception to this is found with brewers who bottled their beer. Although beer was being bottled as early as the 1500s, bottles were so difficult to obtain that they were considered a luxury. But by the 1850s, more brewers were bottling, and they used bottles embossed with their names. Indeed, bottles still can be found for some brewers for which there is no other evidence of their existence. The use of embossed bottles was not necessarily seen by these breweries as a form of advertising. Instead, it mainly was intended to aid them in getting their bottles back from customers.

Most 1840s-era advertising, as represented by this trade card from the Ohm & Keine brewery in Germany, was printed in black ink on white stock.

A nice selection of Anheuser-Busch, St. Louis, embossed branch bottles, from its coast-to-coast depot network.

Advertisements for pre-1870 brewers also appear in a few other places, including early city directory ads. Other ephemera found for these breweries include letterhead, bills of sale, keg tags, business records, and even personal diaries kept by a few brewers. But most items from this era are extremely rare. While this makes them valuable to collectors, their esoteric nature can make them a bargain when compared to some newer items.

As industrialization began hitting the brewing industry full-force in the 1870s, changes that revolutionized the industry also would result in the production of breweriana. Both the beer business and brewery advertising were ready to enter a golden age.

A thermometer issued by Bergner & Engel Brewing, of Philadelphia, advertising Tannhaeuser, the name of a famous Richard Wagner opera.

To catch a man’s eye in a tavern, feature a pretty woman in the ad. Surely that was the strategy behind this 1908 calendar from Cape Brewery & Ice, Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

BEER BARONS AND INDUSTRIALIZATION

BY 1873, more than four thousand breweries were operating in the United States. Most were small concerns producing and packaging kegged beer for a local clientele. The brewing process itself was restricted to the cooler months, the beer was aged and stored in underground cellars, and any other refrigeration consisted of storing ice cut during the winter and packed in straw. But numerous inventions soon were to begin dramatically changing the brewing industry.

The most important changes involved mechanization within the brewery, as the process went from one that was little understood to one that was somewhat scientific. Advances in glass production and the development of pasteurization led to greater availability of beer in bottles. Improvements in equipment enabled bottling to evolve from a manual to a highly mechanized process.

An improved transportation system allowed brewers who were so inclined to expand their export business. The great expansion of railroads gave breweries a chance to ship their products long distances, using icehouses and storage depots strategically located along the tracks. Some of the larger breweries shipped so much beer that they owned their own rail cars.

The shipping business proved to be especially lucrative for breweries in the midwestern cities of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and St. Louis, Missouri. Located where the population was less dense and with many local competitors, their method of growth was to invade the more populous East as well as the South and West, where there were fewer breweries. Pabst and Schlitz of Milwaukee, Lemp and Anheuser-Busch of St. Louis, and, to a lesser extent, many others, sent their beer across the country and all over the world.

The late 1870s also saw the introduction of refrigeration into breweries. Although initially unreliable, refrigerating machines were quickly improved. This not only allowed breweries to make beer year-round, it also enabled them to more closely control the brewing process.

A rough economy chased many brewers out of business around 1880, and economies of scale enjoyed by some of the large companies led to heated competition between small local breweries and out-of-town giants. As a way to distinguish themselves from their competitors, the brewers began thinking about ways to promote their product. To help simplify their marketing efforts, branding became popular. Most breweries continued producing a variety of beer styles, b
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owl of brightly colored eggs, and a bouquet of fresh hyacinths. Another important part of this day is the blessing of the Easter foods. Families fill a basket with a sampling of their Easter treats, usually including bread, salt, hard-boiled eggs, cold meats, an assortment of desserts, and a small lamb made of butter. These baskets are then taken to church, where a priest blesses their contents. Through this ritual, the special meal of the following day is also blessed.

On Sunday morning, families attend Easter Mass and then hurry home for the wonderful meal. Guests are always welcome, and each person is met by the host to share part of a hard-boiled egg. At last, everyone settles in to enjoy the delicious feast.Typical dishes include soups, baked ham, sausages, roast beef or veal, salads, sauces, and relishes. A selection of delectable desserts, such as the traditional babkas and mazureks, makes the meal complete .

The day after Easter, a unique Polish tradition is practiced by young people, especially in rural areas and small towns. Also called Dyngus Day, Easter Monday is a time for Polish boys and young men to splash girls and young women with water. These encounters can be as harmless as a sprinkling of a few drops or as drenching as a bucketful of water over the head. Although no one knows for certain the origins of this long-standing tradition, it remains popular in modern times, and Polish girls keep a sharp eye out for lurking boys on Dyngus Day.

Second only to Easter in religious significance, Christmas is a festive time in Poland. Preparations begin a few days before December 25, as families clean their homes, pick out Christmas trees, and buy 12

gifts and food. In large cities and towns, squares and markets bustle with busy vendors and shoppers. On Christmas Eve day, Polish children help trim the family Christmas tree with traditional decorations, including apples, nuts, candy, and homemade ornaments of straw or paper.

Christmas Eve is a day of fasting, which is broken by a dinner called the Wigilia. This special meal is not eaten until a member of the family, usually a child, spots the first evening star in the winter sky. The Christmas Eve table is covered with a snow-white linen

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cloth and set with the family’s best dishes. An extra place is always set at the table on this night for any unexpected visitor. Candles are lit, and a small bundle of straw or hay is placed underneath the tablecloth, symbolizing the manger that the baby Jesus slept in.

The hay also represents peace, the family’s good deeds during Advent (the period beginning four Sundays before Christmas), and their hopes for the future. In the center of the table is the opl/atek, the Christmas wafer, which is traditionally baked by nuns and blessed by a priest. Before the meal, the family shares this special wafer while offering good wishes to one another. In some rural areas, part of the wafer is also offered to the family’s livestock, in honor of the animals that were present at Jesus’ birth.

At last it’s time for the carefully prepared dinner. Although meatless, this is a holiday feast that may consist of as many as twelve courses. Typical dishes include beet or mushroom soup, a main course of fish, and a variety of side dishes and desserts.

Mushrooms are a popular ingredient, and poppy seeds are in many of the traditional desserts. Every bite is savored and enjoyed by all.

After the big meal, many Polish families enjoy singing their favorite Christmas carols. Another popular pastime is predicting the future by reading the smoke from the candles on the table and by drawing pieces of straw from beneath the tablecloth. Some families open gifts, while others wait until Christmas Day. As it grows later, families get ready to go to their local churches for the Pasterka, or Shepherd’s Mass.This service begins at midnight and doesn’t end until after 2:00

A.M. on Christmas morning.

Christmas Day is a calm, quiet day for most Polish families. Many people pay visits to friends and relatives, and some enjoy caroling.

Guests are always welcome to share a sweet treat and to warm up with a hot beverage such as tea, coffee, or apple cider. The day after Christmas, also known as Saint Stephen’s Day, is the last day of vacation for many people and may be spent paying more visits, caroling, and relaxing.

14

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On New Year’s Eve, many people throw or attend festive parties or fancy dinners and dances. It is an evening to make predictions and wishes for the coming year and to bid farewell to the old. At the stroke of midnight, the new year is welcomed in with great happiness and excitement.

This time of year is also the beginning of the Polish carnival season, and a popular activity is the kulig, or sleigh ride. Bundled in their warmest clothes, Polish families and friends pile into horse-drawn sleighs and go from house to
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ied (coincidentally to a dairy farmer’s daughter!) on a small dairy farm in Oxfordshire. I was honoured to cater: seven extravagant whole sirloins spit-roasted, and stem ginger and chocolate raw milkshakes for 150 people, but it was the butter everyone commented on and remembered. A sundried tomato butter (the recipe) and a simple salted cultured butter were the standout hits.

So I took the obvious next step: with the help of my uncle, I built and installed a cabin on that same dairy farm and started making butter by hand (a process I still use to this day). Pretty soon I was making butter I felt confident with, and I started supplying local gastropubs. This led to other customers, including some 20 Michelin-starred restaurants, such as Bibendum, Restaurant Sat Bains and Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons. Shops were also keen on the butter, like Fortnum & Mason and Harrods.

It seemed there was, and continues to be, a real demand for butter that is fresh, crafted carefully and made using top-quality ingredients (milk produced from English-bred Jersey dairy cows, a healthy culture and a touch of Himalayan sea salt). And I’m delighted to see such a staple, delicious and important ingredient being recognised globally for its significance on the dinner table. GH

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Part of the joy in mastering the making of good bread and butter is that no matter how expert you become, you are still somewhat at their mercy.

Eve Hemingway

* * *

I’m not sure I can call myself a food writer, but I have wanted to write about food for as long as I can remember. Luckily I got to know Grant through Rich when Druid Street Market in South London was still going. I helped out on the market stall and probably snacked on more of the samples than I’d care to admit. I love their products, so when they asked if I’d write a book with them, I was more than happy to oblige.

Grant and Rich are two producers who have heavily influenced how I think about food. Sustainable, tasty, high-calorie produce is my passion, so I’m a great fan of their work. But it’s not all about eating: I’m a food nerd and am equally interested in production methods as I am about taste. From its inception through to digestion, I love learning about food, and feel lucky to be part of a generation that is excited to find out as much as possible about what’s on our plates and how it got there.

In my teens, I was given Delia’s How to Cook (parts I, II and III) and methodically worked my way through all the volumes, learning to boil eggs, fry onions and bake bread. For my 16th birthday, I went to watch cookery writer Sophie Grigson in our local village hall stew oranges with black peppercorns. Though, it seems, I was on a food-focused path long before this.

Apparently, aged four, sitting at the dinner table, I would pause half-way through my main course, tilt my head to one side and sincerely ask, ‘pudding?’. Patience has never been a strong point, and I still need to walk out of the kitchen after baking to allow bread and cakes to cool before tearing into them.

Memories of pudding are undoubtedly important, but it’s an earlier memory that must have informed so much of how I think about food today. I remember being a small child and putting cake ingredients in a stand mixer. A tea towel would be draped over the top of the mixer so the flour wouldn’t cover the kitchen in its dust. Mum would turn the mixer on to a slow setting, pick me up and we’d periodically peek under the tea towel to see if the mixture was ready to be poured into the tin. We would alternate between chatting and peeking, chatting and peeking. There was something about this process that took time and care in equal measure. Not rushing and letting the food do its good work.

I hope I’ve managed to capture a little of that care and joy in my recipes, and I hope the background history and culture offer a chance to reflect on two truly outstanding ingredients. EH

Ancient origins

In this chapter we look at how people came to make and eat bread and butter in the first place. What follows is by no means a comprehensive account, but rather a compilation of the elements we found most scintillating, charting the origins of bread, followed by butter… and then, yes, both together.

Origins of bread

Let’s begin with the humble loaf – and it’s useful to understand exactly what this is before we move on. The Oxford English Dictionary defines bread as ‘A well-known article of food prepared by moistening, kneading and baking meal or flour, generally with the addition of yeast or leaven’. And when we talk about sourdough, we mean bread made solely with flour from grains (as opposed to legumes and pulses), plus salt, water and a cultured starter.

So when did it all begin? To find out, we turned to the mighty font of all knowledge, the British Library. We started at the turn of the twentieth century and with John Ashton, a little known yet proli
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the USA. The allergens are not declared in bold within the ingredient declaration, but appear in the following format: Allergy Advice Contains: Wheat.

EATING OUT

Restaurants are now more aware of dietary issues, so eating out need not be a source of anxiety. Whenever possible do a little research beforehand. If you discover there is nothing you can eat from the existing menu, some restaurants may offer to create something especially for you – after all, it is good for business. Remember that the chef also needs to know how to prepare the food safely, to avoid cross-contamination, and that the sauces and stocks they commonly use often contain wheat flour. Some restaurants list the major allergens on their menus, which saves lengthy discussions at the time of ordering, and most will be understanding if you need to bring individual items such as bread or pizza bases, with you when you dine away from home.

Tips for gluten-free living

• Use separate butter/margarine, jam and so on, so that they do not become contaminated by breadcrumbs; you will need a separate toaster or toaster bag too.

• Remember to fry gluten-free foods in a different pan from the others.

• Make sure that you serve gluten-free food with a different spoon from the one you use for other food.

• Keep all unsafe food out of the reach of any children following a gluten-free diet.

• When eating away from home, make sure that the person cooking for you knows what foods contain gluten and follows food-safe procedures; take your own food with you if they seem unsure or unwilling.

Sport and a gluten-free diet

Whether you exercise professionally or purely for recreation, intake of carbohydrates before, during and after training plays an important role in keeping your energy levels up and regulating your blood sugar, and in helping you to recover afterwards. Carbohydrates are typically sourced from the gluten-rich grains wheat, barley and rye, which are off-limits to those following a gluten-free diet. There is, however, an increasing number of readily available, nutritious gluten-free products to buy on the go and recipes to follow that ensure you can refuel adequately and do not become deficient in the essential vitamins and minerals the body needs for repair.

Some athletes believe that a gluten-free diet actually enhances their performance – and not only because they are free from unpleasant digestive symptoms. Quick (gluten-rich) sources of carbohydrate are often refined or processed (in other words, they can be less nutritious), and have a high glycaemic index (they quickly raise your blood-sugar levels, but not in a sustained way). Those following a gluten-free diet are reliant on foods that are higher in resistant starches and fibre whch possess a lower glycaemic index (they cause a gradual rise in blood-sugar levels over a longer time), giving them energy for greater lengths of time.

TRAVEL AND HOLIDAYS

Making sure that you can eat safely while you are travelling can be challenging, as many of the fast-food items that are available will not be suitable for you. By far the safest thing to do is to take your own food with you, particularly ‘on-the-go’ snacks (see here). This is not always very practical for long journeys and flights, however, but most airlines (with the exception of the budget ones) will be able to provide gluten-free meals if ordered in advance. If you have a severe wheat allergy, you will need to take appropriate medication with you (plus a doctor’s letter explaining what this is for). Pack wipes in your hand luggage to clean tables, trays and armrests, and explain your food issues to those around you so that they understand your needs.

Choosing a holiday requires thought, both in the destination and in the type of accommodation. Countries in the northern hemisphere rely heavily on gluten-rich cereals as their staple, for example, and the range of gluten-free foodstuffs that you are able to use at home may not be so readily available elsewhere. In addition, language barriers can make it difficult to get your needs across. Take as many non-perishable snacks and foods with you as you can. Hotel stays may be the most relaxing option for others, but they could be a source of stress and extra effort for you, requiring contact with the hotel in advance to let them know your dietary needs and monitoring of how your food is prepared. Self-catering accommodation can often be the safest bet.

Easy ‘on-the-go’ snacks

• Fresh fruit, in particular bananas

• Vegetables cut into bite-sized pieces, such as carrots, and served with hummus

• Nuts and dried fruit

• Gluten-free cereal bars and biscuits

• Popcorn and gluten-free potato and root vegetable crisps

• Gluten-free oatcakes eaten on their own or sandwiched together with pâté or cheese

YOUR GLUTEN-FRE
ND SKINLESS, BONELESS CHICKEN BREAST HALVES, CUT INTO ½-INCH CHUNKS

3 TEASPOONS EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

1 SMALL ONION, THINLY SLICED

2 LARGE PEPPERS, ORANGE AND YELLOW, SLICED

½ CUP WATER

⅞ TEASPOON SALT

⅜ TEASPOON GROUND BLACK PEPPER

8 OUNCES SUGAR SNAP PEAS, STRINGS REMOVED, CUT IN HALF

⅓ CUP FRESH DILL, CHOPPED

1 From lemon, grate 1 teaspoon peel; set aside. Into pie plate, squeeze 1 tablespoon juice. Add chicken; turn to coat.

2 In 12-inch skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil over medium-high heat. Add onion, peppers, 2 tablespoons water, and ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper. Cook 3 minutes or until softened, stirring. Transfer to large plate.

3 In same skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil over medium-high heat. Add peas, 2 tablespoons water, ⅛ teaspoon salt, and remaining ⅛ teaspoon black pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes or until beginning to brown. Add to pepper mixture.

4 In same skillet, heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil over medium-high heat. Add chicken; sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon salt. Cook 3 minutes or until golden, stirring once. Return vegetables to pan; add remaining ¼ cup water. Cook 1 minute or until saucy, stirring. Stir in dill, remaining ¼ teaspoon salt, and reserved lemon peel.

* * *

EACH SERVING: ABOUT 230 CALORIES | 27G PROTEIN | 14G CARBOHYDRATE | 7G TOTAL FAT (1G SATURATED) | 73MG CHOLESTEROL | 650MG SODIUM

PLUM BALSAMIC SKILLET CHICKEN

Chicken is the ideal foil for bold flavors—like this sweet-tangy combo of plums, balsamic vinegar, and honey. Select from a wide variety of black or purple plums, or try nectarines for a tasty twist.

* * *

ACTIVE TIME: 25 MINUTES

TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES

MAKES: 4 MAIN-DISH SERVINGS

* * *

4 MEDIUM SKINLESS, BONELESS CHICKEN BREAST HALVES (1¼ POUNDS)

⅛ TEASPOON GROUND BLACK PEPPER

½ TEASPOON SALT

1 TABLESPOON OLIVE OIL

½ MEDIUM RED ONION, CHOPPED

3 SMALL PLUMS, EACH PITTED AND CUT INTO 8 WEDGES

½ CUP CANNED REDUCED-SODIUM CHICKEN BROTH OR HOMEMADE CHICKEN BROTH

2 TABLESPOONS BALSAMIC VINEGAR

1 TABLESPOON HONEY

1 With meat mallet, or between two sheets of plastic wrap or waxed paper with rolling pin, pound chicken breast halves to ½-inch thickness; sprinkle with pepper and ¼ teaspoon salt.

2 In nonstick 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium heat until hot. Add chicken breasts and cook, turning once, until browned on both sides and chicken loses pink color throughout, 6 to 7 minutes. Transfer chicken breasts to platter; cover loosely with foil to keep warm.

3 To same skillet, add onion and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until softened, 3 minutes. Add plums and cook, turning occasionally, until lightly browned, 3 minutes. Stir in broth, balsamic vinegar, honey, remaining ¼ teaspoon salt, and any juices from platter; cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is slightly reduced, 3 to 4 minutes. To serve, spoon sauce over chicken.

* * *

EACH SERVING: ABOUT 240 CALORIES | 34G PROTEIN | 13G CARBOHYDRATE | 6G TOTAL FAT (1G SATURATED) | 82MG CHOLESTEROL | 440MG SODIUM

ROMAN CHICKEN SAUTÉ WITH ARTICHOKES

This light and tangy chicken dish, studded with sweet grape tomatoes and garlicky artichoke hearts, is served over a bed of spicy arugula.

* * *

ACTIVE TIME: 15 MINUTES

TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES

MAKES: 6 MAIN-DISH SERVINGS

* * *

1¼ POUNDS CHICKEN BREAST TENDERS, EACH CUT CROSSWISE IN HALF, THEN CUT LENGTHWISE IN HALF

¼ TEASPOON SALT

¼ TEASPOON GROUND BLACK PEPPER

3 TEASPOONS OLIVE OIL

2 GARLIC CLOVES, THINLY SLICED

1 CAN (13 TO 14 OUNCES) ARTICHOKE HEARTS, DRAINED, EACH CUT INTO QUARTERS

½ CUP DRY WHITE WINE

½ CUP CANNED CHICKEN BROTH OR HOMEMADE CHICKEN BROTH

1 PINT GRAPE TOMATOES

1 TEASPOON GRATED FRESH LEMON PEEL, PLUS ADDITIONAL FOR GARNISH

1 BAG (5 TO 6 OUNCES) BABY ARUGULA

1 Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper to season all sides. In 12-inch skillet, heat 2 teaspoons oil over medium-high heat until very hot. Add chicken and cook, stirring occasionally, 8 minutes or until browned on the outside and no longer pink inside. With slotted spoon, transfer chicken tenders to bowl.

2 To same skillet, add remaining 1 teaspoon oil. Reduce heat to medium and add garlic; cook 30 seconds or until golden. Stir in artichokes, and cook 3 to 4 minutes or until browned. Stir in wine, and cook 1 minute over medium-high heat.

3 Add chicken broth and tomatoes; cover and cook 2 to 3 minutes or until most tomatoes burst. Remove skillet from heat. Return chicken to skillet; stir in lemon peel until combined. Arrange arugula on platter; top with sautéed chicken mixture. Garnish chicken with remaining lemon peel.

* * *

EACH SERVING: ABOUT 165 CALORIES | 25G PROTEIN | 7G CARBOHYDRATE | 4G TOTAL FAT (1G SATURATED) | 55MG CHOLESTEROL | 330MG SODIUM

CHICKEN WITH PEARS AND MARSALA

Fresh pears and a wine sauce spiked wit

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