My Kitchen by Pete Evans – ISBN: 1741968283

  • Full Title: My Kitchen: Casual Home Cooking
  • Autor: Pete Evans
  • Print Length: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Murdoch Books
  • Publication Date: September 1, 2011
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741968283
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741968286
  • Download File Format | Size: epub | 10,45 Mb
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Bestselling author and chef Pete Evans brings cooking back to his home kitchen in My Kitchen. Focussing on casual home cooking as a lifestyle, Pete keeps it relaxed with fresh ingredients and flavors for every meal of the day. Featuring the dishes Pete loves to prepare for his family, My Kitchen offers all the inspiration you need to regularly cook simple, interesting meals that are bursting with flavour. Whether you want to create the ultimate seafood curry, a succulent steak with mint, lemon and chilli, or a classic lemon and lime cheesecake, My Kitchen is packed with fabulous meal ideas for the entire family.

 

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Pete Evans has built a reputation as a chef, restaurateur, television presenter and (his personal favorite) fisherman. He hosts a hit cooking show in Australia, My Kitchen Rules. His television work has also included daily food show Fresh, the series Fish, sixty episodes of Home for the LifeStyle Channel and a documentary, Cooking for our Princess Mary. Pete’s award-winning restaurants include Hugo’s Manly, Hugo’s Bar Pizza and Hugo’s Lounge in Sydney, as well as The Pantry in Brighton, Victoria.

 

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Designer: Merideth Harte

Editor: Kim Suarez

Production Editor: Andrew Yackira

Photography © Nadine Greeff, p. 25 © Hélène Dujardin; food styling by TamiiHardeman

Map illustration by Merideth Harte

ISBN: Print 978-1-64152-219-9 | eBook 978-1-64152-220-5

*

Dedication

To Hope, Nick, Ashley, and Jack for always believing in their mom and adding flavor to my life. I love you forever and always.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1: Mexican Food Fast & Easy

RECIPES

CHAPTER 2: Salsas & Sauces

CALDILLO DE JITOMATE Mexican Tomato Salsa

QUESO BLANCO DIP

CLASSIC TOMATILLO AND ÁRBOL CHILE SALSA

NACHO CHEESE SAUCE

QUESO FUNDIDO A LA CERVEZA Boozy Queso Fundido

SALSA DE CHILE COLORADO Red Chile Salsa

SALSA GEMMA Gemma-Style Salsa

SALSA RANCHERA Ranch-Style Salsa

SPICY SALSA VERDE

CHAPTER 3: Rice & Beans

CLASSIC MEXICAN RICE

ARROZ BLANCO White Rice

ARROZ VERDE Green Rice

FRIJOLES DE LA OLLA Cooked Beans

FRIJOLES BORRACHOS Drunken Beans

FRIJOLES MENEADOS Refried Beans

FRIJOLES PUERCOS Pork and Bean Stew

SOPA DE GARBANZOS Chickpea Soup

SOPA DE LENTEJAS Lentil Soup

CHAPTER 4: Soups, Stews & Chilies

ALBÓNDIGAS EN CALDILLO Meatball Soup in Tomato Broth

BLACK BEAN, SWEET POTATO, AND CHORIZO CHILI

CALDO DE POLLO Mexican Chicken Soup

SOPA DE FIDEO Mexican Noodle Soup

TEX-MEX CHILI

COCIDO DE RES Mexican Beef Soup

GALLINA PINTA Beef, Bean, and Hominy Soup

GREEN CHICKEN POZOLE

MENUDO/PANCITA Tripe Soup

MOLE DE OLLA Spicy Chicken and Vegetable Soup

POZOLE BLANCO White Pozole

TRADITIONAL RED PORK POZOLE

VEGETARIAN CHILI

CHILE RELLENO CHOWDER

CHAPTER 5: Vegetable Mains

TACOS DE RAJAS CON CREMA Roasted Poblano Strips with Cream Tacos

CAULIFLOWER TINGA

LENTIL PICADILLO

JACKFRUIT AL PASTOR TACOS

CHILEATOLE VERDE Salsa Verde Soup

PORTOBELLO ALAMBRES Portobello Fajitas with Bacon and Cheese

EJOTES EN SALSA DE CHILE COLORADO Green Beans in Red Chile Sauce

TAMALES DE RAJAS Roasted Poblano Pepper Tamales

CALABACITAS Mexican Zucchini

CHAPTER 6: Chicken

ARROZ CON POLLO Chicken with Rice

BARBACOA DE POLLO Chicken Barbacoa

CALDO TLALPEÑO Tlalpeño-Style Chicken and Chickpea Soup

CARNITAS DE POLLO Chicken C
char siu bao, cookies ingredients, gluten free foods, m&m cookies, diabetic recipes,
ne Busico and Regina Schrambling, to whom I am most grateful. I’ll always be indebted to Trish Hall and Rick Flaste, the Times editors who were not only responsible for the column’s inception but were and remain supportive and encouraging.

The Minimalist Cooks Dinner is the work of the great folks at Broadway Books, most notably Jennifer Josephy, Steve Rubin, and Tammy Blake.

Many home cooks, fellow food-writers, and chefs all over the country and the world have given me great ideas for “the Mini,” and I’ve thanked them in the appropriate places. My friend Ed Schneider, whose daily correspondence challenges me and keeps me on my toes, and my coauthor Jean-Georges Vongerichten—a minimalist’s maximalist—deserve special mention.

Thanks as usual to Angela Miller, who is always there for me, not only as an agent but as a friend; to the ever-tolerant John Willoughby; and to the loving Alisa Smith. And, especially this year, I was blessed to count among my friends David Paskin, Pamela Hort, John Ringwald, Semeon Tsalbins, Joe and Kim McGrath, Bill Shinker and Susan Moldow, Mitchell Orfuss, Naomi Glauberman, John Bancroft, Madeline Meacham, Fred Zolna, and Sherry Slade. Karen Baar was the source of a large chunk of the inspiration and creativity that go into the Minimalist; for this and many other things I’ll always be grateful.

—Mark Bittman

These hundred-odd recipes represent about two years of my New York Times column, an average of a recipe a week. They have a couple of things in common. First of all, that they were developed at the rate of one a week is no coincidence, since almost all appeared in my weekly column, “The Minimalist.” Second, they are intended to be easy, often simple, and usually quick (those that are not quick spread out a little bit of work over a few hours).

If they are successful, if they provide you with satisfying dishes with a minimum of effort, it’s thanks in large part to the fact that I am lucky enough to work on just one recipe a week. There were times in my career as a food writer when I was obligated to come up with twelve recipes a week; this simply cannot be done on a regular basis without begging and borrowing recipes from friends, chefs, and fellow food writers, and submitting them without testing or changing.

I still beg and borrow ideas, and from the same sources. But these days I take those ideas home, to my average suburban kitchen with its average equipment, and work them to death, until I’m satisfied that they can’t be made any simpler or easier without sacrificing too much of their essence.

If this sounds like a compromise, it is. Cooking, like most everything else in life, is exactly that. We never have as much time as we like, we rarely have the perfect ingredients, and few of us—myself included, lest you doubt it—have the skills to measure up to truly demanding recipes. My job, as I see it, is to show you the little path I blaze, the route that makes things faster, more flexible, and easier.

Sometimes I am accused of going too far, and failing to retain a recipe’s soul, losing too much of its vitality in the process of simplifying it. I try to take this objection into account and remedy it by offering a wide range of substitutions and variations, ways to make recipes more complex, slightly fancier, more sophisticated, or just different.

Simple, as a friend of mine said to me, need not mean simple-minded. As much thought and work may go into figuring out a great three-ingredient, 30-minute recipe as one that includes thirty ingredients and takes 3 hours. The fact that the preparation and execution is faster and easier does not make the recipe less sophisticated, complex, or desirable—indeed, it may make it more so.

The Minimalist Cooks Dinner differs from its predecessor, The Minimalist Cooks at Home, in a few ways. The texts are shorter, the pointer sections more substantial. Furthermore, I have included serving and wine suggestions as well as a chapter of quick, easy side dishes, so that you can easily complete a meal based on one of the recipes here. But I want to stress that these serving suggestions are exactly that—a list of dishes that I think might well serve to complement the main course. You might want more, less, different, or none, and by all means I encourage you to go your own way.

That’s what home cooking is about.

VICHYSSOISE WITH GARLIC

NEARLY INSTANT MISO SOUP WITH TOFU

THE MINIMALIST’S CORN CHOWDER

CUCUMBER SOUP, TWO WAYS

ROASTED CHESTNUT SOUP

BLACK-EYED PEA SOUP WITH HAM AND GREENS

CHICKPEA SOUP, WITH OR WITHOUT MEAT

CAULIFLOWER CURRY WITH CHICKEN

CURRIED TOFU WITH SOY SAUCE

WHOLE-MEAL CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP, CHINESE STYLE

FAST MUSHROOM SOUP, CREAMY OR LOW-FAT

Vichyssoise

with Garlic

TIME: 40 to 60 m
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es, raised beds, ponds, waterways and tracks,

well covered with fruit trees and other productive vegetation and with the

farmhouse neatly nestling amongst them. There, at an altitude which everyone

else has abandoned to low-value forestry, what is probably the best example of

a permaculture farm in Europe stands out like a beacon. It stands as witness to

both the contrariness and the skill of the Rebel Farmer.

He has always gone against the grain of modern farming: he cultivates rich

mixtures of plants and animals in place of monocultures; he has no need for

chemicals because the dynamic interactions between the plants and animals in

his polycultures provide all the services which conventional farmers find in the

fertiliser bag and the crop sprayer. But it takes more than a contrary nature to be a

rebel farmer. It also takes skill and knowledge, and these don’t come easily. Right

from his childhood, when his mother gave him a small plot for his first garden,

he has observed, questioned, experimented, observed again and experimented

again. He knows the natural world like few other people do today, and treats his

farm as an integrated part of that natural world – which is exactly what it is.

In this book he shares the skill and knowledge which he has acquired over his

lifetime. He covers every aspect of his farming, not just how he creates a holistic

system on the farm itself but also how he makes a living from it. He writes about

everything from the overall concepts which guide him down to the details, such

as which fruit varieties he has found best for permaculture growing. Farming at

such a high altitude is a challenge in itself, and as well as his knowledge of plant

and animal interactions he has had to learn much about how heat and water

pass through the ecosystem, and how they can be stored and made to work for

the system.

An important part of permaculture is getting to know your own individual

place. Every patch of the Earth has its unique personality and character, just

as each person has. Nevertheless Sepp Holzer has taken his skill and applied

it on sites all over the world and in urban gardens too. It takes a great deal

of experience to be able to look at a site in a different part of the world and

understand how it works well enough to be able to give advice on it.

The other side of that coin is that what works for him on his Austrian

mountain will not necessarily work for you on your own land. Here in Britain,

ix

Sepp Holzer’s Permaculture

for example, we have a cloudy maritime climate, in strong contrast to Austria’s

continental climate. Although our winters are milder, so too are our summers.

Above all we lack the sunshine which is such a key element in the way he creates

favourable microclimates. Humidity is also greater here. What you can do, say,

at 250m on the edge of Bodmin Moor is not the same as what you can do at ten

times that altitude on the Krameterhof. Similar allowances must be made for

other parts of the world.

This is not to negate the value of this book for people who live outside

Austria – far from it. Much of the detailed information is highly relevant in any

temperate country. As long as you bear in mind that both your climate and your

soil are possibly quite different to those on the Krameterhof, you will find it a

storehouse of valuable information.

Nevertheless the book’s greatest value is not so much in the information

it contains but in the attitudes it teaches. Its message is not so much ‘this is

how you do it’ but ‘this is the way you go about thinking of how to do it.’ Sepp

Holzer’s way is the way of the future. In the fossil fuel age we’ve been able to

impose our will on the land by throwing cheap energy at every problem. In the

future that option won’t be open to us any more. We’ll have to tread the more

subtle path, the path which patiently observes nature and seeks to imitate it.

That future may not be as far off as we think.

Patrick Whitefield

September 2010

Patrick Whitefield is a permaculture teacher and the author of Permaculture in

a Nutshell (1993), How to make a Forest Garden (1996), The Earth Care Manual (2004) and The Living Landscape (2009). More details about his courses can be

found at www.patrickwhitefield.co.uk

x

Preface

Dear readers,

This is the second book I have written

so far, to pass on my over 40 years

of experience as a farmer practising

alternative agriculture. I was inspired

to do this by the many people who

have come to visit the Krameterhof:

among them teachers, professors

and doctors as well as farmers and

gardeners. My darling wife, Vroni,

and my children were particularly

eager for me to put my experiences

and discoveries into writing. My first

book, an autobiography entitled The

Rebel Farme
chocolate pie, dessert recipes for kids, non alcoholic wine, microwave recipes, lemon curd,
ked, much like spinach, and have a mild, mineral flavor that is great in salads, stir-fries, and braises. Sweet potato leaves are widely eaten as a cooked green in Asia and West Africa.

COMPLEMENTARY SEASONINGS AND INGREDIENTS

FRUITS: orange, lemon, lime, yuzu, peach, cherry, apricot, pineapple, coconut, mango, apple

VEGETABLES: chiles, onions, celery, carrots, mushrooms, corn, pole beans, peas, leafy greens, tomatoes

SPICES AND CONDIMENTS: cayenne, chili powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, cumin, coriander, mustard, miso, soy sauce, chipotle in adobo, hot sauce, ketchup

HERBS AND AROMATICS: ginger, garlic, rosemary, cilantro, thyme, chives, scallions, oregano

SWEETENERS: brown sugar, honey, coconut sugar, molasses, chocolate, maple syrup

DAIRY AND FATS: butter, cream, whole milk, yogurt, coconut oil, sesame oil, olive oil, blue cheese, Parmesan, pecorino (sheep’s milk cheese), goat cheese

PROTEINS: pork, chicken, turkey, beef, shrimp, fin fish, clams, scallops, lobster, black beans, butter beans, white beans, lentils

NUTS AND SEEDS: pecans, cashews, walnuts, almonds, peanuts, pepitas, sunflower seeds

SWEET POTATOES BUTTER

Sweet potatoes and butter are a match made in heaven. The fat from the butter helps your body to absorb the nutrients found in sweet potatoes, and the combinations below offer an extra hit of flavor. Each makes enough to dress 1 pound of boiled, roasted, or mashed sweet potatoes.

MISO BUTTER

Mash 2 tablespoons unsalted butter and 1 tablespoon red or white miso with a fork to form a paste.

MAPLE-WALNUT BUTTER

Mash 2 tablespoons chopped walnuts, 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, 1 tablespoon maple syrup, and a pinch of salt with a fork to form a chunky mixture.

OLD BAY BUTTER

Mash 2 tablespoons unsalted butter with 2 teaspoons Old Bay or Cajun seasoning with a fork until smooth.

IN THE ROUGH

STEAMED SWEET POTATOES

OVEN-ROASTED SWEET POTATOES

COAL-ROASTED SWEET POTATOES

BOILED SWEET POTATOES

SWEET POTATO PUREE

SWEET POTATO FRIES THE HARD WAY

SWEET POTATO FRIES THE EASY WAY

SWEET POTATO CHIPS

STEAMED

SWEET POTATOES

Steaming sweet potatoes in batons or bite-size pieces is the best choice for when you want their sharp corners maintained and a moist result. This cooking method is the perfect way to prepare sweet potatoes for pickling (see this page). Try cooled steamed sweet potatoes as crudités, or simply dress them with a little vinaigrette and they become an open-the-fridge-and-feed-yourself snack.

SERVES 4

2 pounds orange- or white-fleshed sweet potatoes

In a large saucepan or pot fitted with a steamer basket, pour water to a depth of at least 2 inches. Cover, set over medium-high heat, and bring the water to a boil.

Meanwhile, peel the sweet potatoes and cut them into uniform pieces, less than 1 inch thick, in any shape you’d like.

When steam whistles from the saucepan, quickly and carefully (steam is hot!) add the pieces of sweet potato to the steamer basket. Re-cover the pot and steam the sweet potatoes until a cake tester or paring knife meets the tiniest, barely noticeable bit of resistance in the center of a couple of pieces, 10 to 15 minutes, depending on size and shape. They should be cooked through but retain enough structure not to fall apart. Transfer the sweet potatoes to a plate or shallow dish and let cool. TIP: Make sure to cut the sweet potatoes into uniform pieces— cubes, batons, or slices—so they cook evenly and hold their shape.

OVEN-ROASTED

SWEET POTATOES

Roasting sweet potatoes may seem like a no-brainer, but, as George Washington Carver wisely wrote, “A sweet potato cooked quickly is not well cooked. Time is an essential element. Twenty minutes may serve to bake a sweet potato so that a hungry man can eat it, but if the flavor is an object, it should be kept in the oven for an hour.”

Starting the sweet potatoes in a cool oven, whenever possible, warms the flesh slowly and evenly without turning the skin into inedible jerky. The sweet potatoes may become tender before they are fully delicious; look for caramelized juice bubbling from the ends of the sweet potatoes and collapsed skin.

SERVES 4

2 pounds orange-fleshed sweet potatoes, scrubbed

Unsalted butter, for serving (optional)

Kosher or flaky sea salt, for serving (optional)

Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper. Use a fork to prick the sweet potatoes in several places; then arrange the sweet potatoes in a single layer on the baking sheet. Place the baking sheet on the middle rack of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F.

Bake the sweet potatoes until their juices bubble like lava from the volcanic ends and pricked skin, caramelizing into a dark pumice, and the skin has softened, dried out, and collapsed onto the flesh, an hour, give or take, depending on the weight and width of your s
grilled lobster, personalised birthday cakes, dessert recipes for kids, chinese takeaway delivery, fruit candy,

* * *

Soups Tips & Tricks

Accompaniment Ideas

Salad Tips & Tricks

Glittering Golden Salad Dressing

My Cheat’s Caesar Salad Dressing

Mexican Chicken Tortilla Soup

Posh Tomato Soup with Cappelletti

Gazpacho with King Prawns & Quails’ Eggs

Chicken Satay Noodle Soup

Pink Soup with Soured Cream & Chives

Chinese Chicken & Mushroom Soup with Sesame Prawn Toast Croutons

Smoked Ham & Piccalilli Salad

Japanese Rare Roast Beef Salad with Mixed Radishes

Sticky Thai Chicken & Mango Salad

Roasted Aubergine, Mint & Yoghurt Salad

Pan-Fried Halloumi with Black Bean, Avocado & Chilli Salsa

As common as our daily bread, soups and salads crop up regularly in most people’s diets. They are a lunchtime favourite and a fantastic opportunity to get loads of vitamins into our diet, not to mention being low in fat. Soups are as much about texture as flavour, so have a think about what you can add to them – croutons, creams, oils, pasta and rice all have their place and make a humble soup into a meal in itself.

With salads, a wonderful dressing can change the most basic of leaves into something quite extraordinary. The modest iceberg lettuce can really come to life with a piquant and creamy dressing. Also, play around with temperature. I love it when a key element in a salad is warm – it makes it feel all the more filling.

These days, familiarity seems to have bred contempt and I find that wilted, soggy salads and dull, insipid soups are far too often the norm – something I’m aiming to address in this chapter!

SOUPS TIPS & TRICKS

So let’s start with soups. For me, a great soup needs a good base flavour and that will come from using a decent stock. Now we all know that making your own stock from scratch is second to none, but to make the amount of stock needed on a weekly basis the average household would have to be running its kitchen as if it were a restaurant. Who has time for that?! This doesn’t mean you need to go for the over-processed cubed variety (although I admit there are some OK stock cubes on the market), but if you can go that extra mile and invest in fresh stocks from the chiller cabinet you will have much better soups and sauces – fact!

Chop everything to a similar size so it all cooks at the same time.

A lot of the flavour in your soup comes from the stock, so use the best quality you can find or, if you have the time, make your own (see here).

Cook your onions slowly, as this will release the sugars in them and add heaps of flavour to your soups.

Purée your soup for at least 30 seconds to ensure it is totally blended and without lumps.

If using potatoes, don’t over-blend them or the soup could become gluey.

When making a smooth soup make sure you sieve the soup for a refined, extra-smooth result.

When making a chunky soup, treat it a bit like a stew and cook it slowly in order for the flavours to marry and mellow.

Never allow a cream based soup to boil as it can split. Also when reheating any type of soup, do not bring it to the boil.

Add any crisp ingredients to the soup at the end of cooking so they don’t become soft or soggy.

Let your soup finish cooking before you add your garnish.

Chunky or smooth? Most people view chunky, broth-like soups as the more rustic version, while smooth, blended soups – particularly if they have been sieved – are more refined. Both are popular these days.

ACCOMPANIMENT IDEAS

OLIVE OIL

You can drizzle it on hot soups or make olive oil ice cubes for cold soups. Use only the best olive oil when doing this, though.

CRISP CROUTONS

For me the only way to make croutons is to tear smallish chunks of bread made with olive oil such as ciabatta, drizzle with more olive oil, rub with a clove of garlic and scatter over some fresh rosemary and bake at 200°C/gas 6 for 20 minutes.

PESTO

To add some really intense flavour to Mediterranean soups, a swirl of basil works a treat.

CHEESE

A good grating of Parmesan can really bring another dimension to your soup, but play around with your favourite flavour combinations. Goat’s cheese is a winner with pea soups, and Cheddar sings with onion soups.

CREAM

Be it a drizzle of double or single, or a dollop of soured cream or crème fraîche, cream has to be the most classic of accompaniments for soups. I would generally only add cream to blended soups.

DUMPLINGS OR MATZO BALLS

As far as I’m concerned, chicken noodle soup isn’t quite right without proper matzo balls. A clever cheat is using some filled pasta and poaching it in the soup for the last few minutes of cooking. I think beef-filled dumplings work brilliantly with chicken-broth soups.

SALAD TIPS & TRICKS

The best salads are a combination of colours, textures and flavours. Think about what you’re trying to achieve. If you’re wanting an Asian vibe, you will get the right flavours and textures by using herbs like
know to stop taking orders, to spill something (or pretend to spill something) and take a minute to clean it up. That’s the only way we could get a handle on it—we were two cooks, a dishwasher, and a cashier in this minuscule space. It was survival of the fittest!

Num Pang was so successful and only getting more and more recognition. We knew we had something there, something to build on. It was a perfect storm for us—banh mi sandwiches got really trendy, everyone’s wallet was light due to the economic crash, and people wanted to eat well but were also conscious about what they were spending. It was a stroke of luck and really great timing.

In 2010, one year after the 12th Street shop opened, Kampuchea closed its doors. Which was all okay—because two years later we opened our second outpost of Num Pang at Grand Central in Midtown, and in 2013, we opened three new locations: our flagship in the NoMad neighborhood, a shop in Chelsea Market, and a location in Times Square. In 2014, we opened our Battery Park location and our new-and-improved 12th Street location in the Village; 2015 brought us to Manhattan’s Financial District. We are busier than ever, and with several new locations on the way, there are no signs of us slowing down.

Cook. This. Book.

You think we sat down and spent two years (yes, people, two freaking years) working on this cookbook to have it sit in your house and collect dust? Um, no. You’re going to cook from this book, and you’re going to love it.

First, let it be said, this is not a cookbook of sandwiches, even though at its core, that’s what Num Pang is all about. When we knocked our heads together to figure out how to capture the essence of our food, we figured that while we’re crazy enough to spend a day marinating and upward of half a day braising a big hunk of meat for a sandwich, the average home cook might not be. That said, take the brisket (or the pork belly or chicken chimichurri, for that matter) off the sandwich, and you have an incredibly flavorful protein that can be the highlight of your dinner.

So we divided the book into chapters that made sense for us: Start Here is self-explanatory. It’s the first place you should look for ideas. This is where the meaty recipes are (and, for fairness, the veggie and fish recipes too), the protein-heavy workhorses of a meal. It’s a big chapter—nearly half the book. But this is the crux of our operation, the foundation of every num pang. And if, after roasting or braising or grilling that piece of meat, fish, or portobello mushroom, you have the desire to turn it (or the leftovers) into the best sandwich you’ll ever put in your mouth, then we give you guidance on how to get there. At the tail end of every recipe in the Start Here chapter, you’ll find instructions on how to “Num Pang It,” or turn the recipe into a num pang (the only exception is when the recipe is actually for a num pang to start with—like the Num Pang Lobster Roll on page 123).

Pickles are a huge part of our food. We serve a pickle with just about everything, from sandwiches to noodle bowls, salads, and even to top lentil soup (page 173). That’s why it’s the second chapter: After deciding what main item you want to make from Start Here, you’ve got to go for a pickle component. Some are sweet, some are spicy, all are really easy. These are refrigerator pickles, not meant for preserving and patience but for people who want a pickle, like, now (or in an hour or two).

On the Side features items that we offer on the menu or not—these are just tasty tidbits like our glazed spicy chicken wings (page 162), Tamarind Baby Back Ribs (page 159), or our coconut and chili mayo topped grilled corn. In a Bowl: Hot, is where you’ll find soups, stews, and warm bowl-friendly dishes like mussels with tomatillos and okra (page 191) and Oxtail Stew (page 183). In a Bowl: Cold, is the home to our chilled summer gazpacho (page 207), as well as salads and slaw (kale salad anyone?). Finally, our drinks have a whole chapter dedicated just to them. Addicted to our Cambodian Iced Coffee (page 222)? Now you can make it yourself.

With many of our recipes, we include a Heads-Up note—this relates a key bit of intel about the recipe that you should be keen on before diving in. If you have to marinate the meat overnight, or if you can substitute an easy-to-find ingredient for a more unusual one, you will probably find that information in the Heads-Up. We also wanted to explain certain ingredients, techniques, cuts, and ideas to readers in a more in-depth style, which is what you’ll see in the Know This section. It’s a source for the hows and whys behind what we do.

If you’re looking to amp up your cooking game, turn the page, pick a recipe, and just go for it.

The Num Pang Pantry

These are the ingredients you’ll see popping up again and again in our recipes—they are the heart and soul of our cooking, and

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