Pancake Cookbook by Grizzly Publishing [epub | 269,42 Kb] ISBN: B07L2R2TTR

  • Full Title: Pancake Cookbook: Delicious Pancake Recipes Made Easy
  • Autor: Grizzly Publishing
  • Print Length: 136 pages
  • Publisher: 
  • Publication Date: December 2, 2018
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: B07L2R2TTR
  • ISBN-13: 
  • Download File Format | Size: epub | 269,42 Kb
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Directions

Pancakes have long been an American breakfast staple. A rather simple treat that can be used as a platform for sweet and savory toppings, easily tailored to your individual wants and your preferences.

But in my opinion, they are so much more than that.

The wonderful world of pancakes is vast and expansive, in which they make the perfect option for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and desert – and with thousands of different pancake recipes, you will never run out of options.

And we have accumulated them all for your eating pleasure!

In this book you will learn how to cook:

• Amazing breakfast pancakes
• Traditional savory pancakes
• Decadent desert pancakes

Pancakes are hands down one of the most versatile and enjoyable foods on this planet – so why in the world shouldn’t they be eaten for every meal of the day if we so desire?

So, take the first step and start to explore the wonderful world of pancake cooking!

 

Editorial Reviews

 

Keywords

r to the Reader

Introduction

1. GETTING DOWN WITH OPP

2. PANTRY ESSENTIALS

3. FAQS

4. MORNING ORANGE BASIL SHOT

CHIA FRUIT TOAST

ALMOND CHERRY MUFFINS

SUUTEI TSAI (MILK TEA)

NUTTY BANANA SMOOTHIE

JOHNNIE COLLINS’S COCONUT YOGURT WITH MANGO AND PAPAYA

PINEAPPLE MINT GREEN SMOOTHIE

BAKLAVA-ISH TOAST

CRUNCHY CHUNKY GRANOLA

OWEN + ALCHEMY’S UNSWEETENED ALMOND MILK

SPICY TAHINI AVOCADO TOAST

CREAMY PEACH PORRIDGE

BLUEBERRY CORN CAKES

CREAMY GRITS WITH AVOCADO AND HOT SAUCE

CHILAQUILES WITH CILANTRO CREAM

OVERNIGHT CHIA OATS

FRENCH TOAST SANDWICH WITH CINNAMON CARDAMOM SYRUP

BREAKFAST POTATO BOWL

5. DIPS + SPREADS + SIDES STRAWBERRY CHIA JAM AND CHOCOLATE CASHEW BUTTER

TAHINI HONEY SPREAD

VINSON PETRILLO’S FRESH CHICKPEA SPREAD WITH CRISPY BLACK OLIVES

ROASTED GARLIC BEAN DIP/SPREAD

CREAMY BABA GANOUSH

WHITE BEAN BUFFALO HUMMUS

JALAPEÑO CORN BREAD

BEET HORSERADISH RELISH/DIP/SPREAD

QUICK PICKLED DILL CUCUMBERS AND RADISHES

ZA’ATAR SWIRL BREAD

PERSIAN-STYLE DILL RICE

QUICK ROASTED SESAME BRUSSELS SPROUTS

FENNEL AND CABBAGE SLAW

HERB FRIES

ROASTED CARROTS WITH PESTO

LEBANESE SPICY POTATOES (BATATA HARRA)

CREAMY SUCCOTASH

MUSHROOM AND LENTIL STUFFING

6. SOUPS + SALADS TOMATO AND WHITE BEAN PANZANELLA

KALE AVOCADO SALAD

CARROT AND PISTACHIO SALAD

JERUSALEM SALAD

DANIEL HOLZMAN’S CHOPPED VEGETABLE SALAD

QUINOA TACO SALAD

TOMATO AND CORN SALAD WITH JALAPEÑO-LIME DRESSING

CREAMY MILLET SALAD

POMEGRANATE, SPINACH, AND WALNUT SALAD

RED LENTIL SOUP

EASY SPICY MISO SOUP

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER AND FENNEL SOUP

ROASTED POTATO, CORN, AND LEEK CHOWDER

THAI COCONUT SOUP

CREAMY ROASTED TOMATO SOUP

RUTH REICHL’S BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP

7. MAINS ROASTED ASPARAGUS AND TOMATO PASTA

OPEN-FACED FALAFEL SANDWICH

MEXICAN FRIED RICE NACHOS

SAAG PLANT-NEER

CREAMY BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND LENTIL TACOS

JOHNNY MARZETTI REMIX

COCONUT QUINOA AND BEANS

EASY RED CURRY VEGGIE BOWLS

PERRY HENDRIX’S ROASTED CARROTS AND SPROUTED LENTIL TABBOULEH

GO-TO SPAGHETTI MARINARA

BLACK-EYED PEAS AND GREENS

CREAMY MUSHROOM LASAGNA

MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY BOWL

CORN CAKES WITH BLACK BEAN SPREAD

ZA’ATAR SWEET POTATOES AND GARLICKY KALE

WHITE BEAN PEPPER CHILI

SPICY BROCCOLI RICE

8. DESSERTS ALMOND BUTTER AND BLUEBERRY COOKIES

HONEY PEPPERMINT CUPS

CHOCOLATE MINT COIN COOKIES

DOUBLE CHOCOLATE CUPCAKES WITH SALTED CHIA PUDDING FROSTING

CHOCOLATE HAZELNUT CRISPIES

NUT BUTTER CHOCOLATE TART

ROASTED PINEAPPLE SUNDAES

COCONUT DATE PINWHEELS

TURTLE EGGS

CHOCOLATE CHUNK COOKIES

TRIPLE BERRY SKILLET COBBLER

NO-BAKE TAHINI CHERRY BARS

JULIA TURSHEN’S STRAWBERRY GRANITA WITH WHIPPED COCONUT CREAM

ROASTED BERRY MILKSHAKE

GRASSHOPPER PARFAIT

CRISPY ICE CREAM BARS

9. SNACKS + SIPS GRILLED CINNAMON AND BANANA SANDWICH

CURRY CORN

BEET AND APPLE SAUCE

SWEET AND SPICY NUTS

TAHINI BALL BALLS

PEACH GINGER TEA

PISTACHIO COCONUT SQUARES

STRAWBERRY BASIL COOLER

WATERMELON LEMONADE

THREE SIMPLE JUICE RECIPES (CARROT AND ORANGE, GREEN APPLE, GREEN DREAM)

CHOCOLATE MILK/HOT CHOCOLATE

Resources

Acknowledgments

Index

About the Author

Credits

Copyright

About the Publisher

Letter to the Reader

from Lena Dunham

Dear Reader,

Welcome to a really good book. Seriously, you don’t know what’s about to hit you—this book is joyful, playful, delicious, and guess what? It will also change your life.

Let me start by saying I’m no saint in the food department. When doctors act impressed that I don’t smoke or drink, I always say, “But you haven’t asked about cheese yet.” Like so many people, so many women, my life has been a struggle between what tastes right to me and what IS right FOR me. Even during a decade-long dalliance with veganism, my regimen consisted of French fries, Sprite, and veggie dogs on massive fluffy buns. My boyfriend describes my dietary preferences as “three-year-old with a credit card.”

When endometriosis entered my life full throttle, I knew I had to make some adjustments as I dealt with a chronic disease, but it was hard to admit those changes might be dietary. When you’re already exhausted, stressed, and pissed at Lady God, you don’t also want your Bolognese and biscuits taken away from you. I was a ravenous beast clinging to quesadillas for dear life.

But after I decided to go public with my struggle, a little angel reached out her hand in the form of one Ms. Jessica Murnane. Without preaching, without judgment, she sent me a list of some of the food changes that had worked for her in her own journey with the illness. I’m pretty public with my challenges, so I get a lot of random emails from people
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who has watched him teach, and studied his methodology, allow me to give all who dare proceed the following suggestions:

• Follow his instructions, even if you think you know better. I’ve heard Ciril tell his students, “I know these formulas work because I’ve thoroughly tested them, but I can only guarantee them if you follow my directions exactly.” (To be fair, Ciril also tells them that once they’ve mastered the procedures they can feel free to improvise and build on what he’s taught them.)

• Study the photos as well as the written procedures and emulate the care you see demonstrated.

• Study the procedures as well as the photos and try to replicate the steps accurately. Don’t rush. There is beauty in the process.

• Use his organizational system as a template upon which to model your own baking and cooking. You will soon find yourself working smarter and, eventually, faster.

Traditionally, there has been very little patient, gentle mentoring in the world of baking and pastry chefs. It used to be sink or swim, do or die. The current generation of artisan baking teachers are forging new ground in which patience as well as structure and discipline are a virtue, even an improvement, in passing knowledge from one generation to the next. Because of this, I foresee a reclamation of the term artisan, rescued from those who think of it as a mere slogan or way of capitalizing on the groundwork lain by real craftsmen and women. If artisans are, as we see reflected by people like Ciril, the mentors and role models of those who hunger and thirst after the elusive real deal, then we also need a generation of mentees to fortify the term artisan and to protect it from dilution. That, fellow readers and users of this book, includes you.

In short, being an artisan is not what someone does but, rather, it’s what someone is.

Peter Reinhart

May 2009

Charlotte, North Carolina

INTRODUCTION

There were many reasons I felt compelled to follow up my first book, Baking Artisan Bread, with a book on pastries and breads, but two are most prominent: evocative sensory memories of morning meals and the variety and flavor inherent in this class of baking. Growing up in Switzerland, I experienced a culture that revered its bakers and homemakers alike, where each day began with something hot from the oven. Whether it came from the corner bakery or was made by Mom, it was made with care from fresh, local ingredients. A typical Sunday morning featured the laughter and conversation of relatives and friends mingling around a table spread with croissants, rolls, and braided bread; complemented by a savory platter of cheeses, smoked meats, spreads, and jars of sweet butters, jams, and honey.

Despite this book’s title, its scope is not limited to the morning meal. Breads and pastries traditionally enjoyed during these hours tend toward the sweeter side, which makes them perfect for afternoon tea as well. But sweetness is not a prerequisite; there are many savory versions of these recipes that highlight the flavors of cheeses, vegetables, and smoked meats, to name a few. These are wonderful additions to a brunch menu and accompany soups, salads, and light dinners perfectly.

FINDING TIME FOR BAKING

We live in a busy time. It used to be that most people could find a moment of quiet each morning or pause for a midday break. Now, most of our days are scheduled to the max. From the moment the alarm clock jars us awake, we begin a choreographed daily routine executed with military precision. A harried series of showers, dressing, and lunch making precedes the drive to work or school with scarcely a minute to spare. Then the afternoon scramble of errands and chauffeuring children to their activities begins. (Some of us miraculously squeeze in a workout.) No wonder we often resort to drive-throughs and sandwich shops in between. A relaxing gathering at the kitchen table is nothing more than a distant memory of days gone by—or a wistful dream for the future. Homemade baked goods? They seem to be the pinnacle of indulgence.

I have some good news: You can have your life, however crazy it may be, and enjoy your own homemade baked goods, too! You don’t have to settle for the snack bar’s offerings filled with artificial ingredients, or for the insipid, trans-fat-laden muffin. With Baking Artisan Pastries and Breads as your guide, you are on the way to enjoying your day just a little bit more. As with any hobby, you will need to spend some time practicing in the kitchen, and you should have an interest in baking and the desire to learn more. You are a part of a growing group of people who, be it from financial necessity or a desire to simplify their life and reconnect with family and friends, are getting back to the basics by spending more time at home and in the kitchen.

NAVIGATING THIS BOOK

Part One imparts basic information and lays the foundation for key b
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ces to the food you already know and love is going to offer a whole new world of possibilities for your cooking. From classic Latin dishes that get a modern update to homey American favorites presented with a Latin twist, I hope you will enjoy cooking from this global culinary journey as much as I did creating it.

Lorena Garcia

THE INDISPENSABLE

DESPENSA

What follows is a breakdown of select ingredients, most of which can be found in your local supermarket, that you should try to have on-hand in your despensa (pantry) to cook the recipes in this book. I didn’t include everyday items like cinnamon, balsamic vinegar, salt, eggs, and butter (I consider the refrigerator and freezer to be as much of a pantry as the cupboards). What I did include are ingredients you might not have, like agave syrup and queso fresco, along with descriptions of what they are. And don’t worry about buying a whole bottle of hoisin and using it in only one recipe in the book. All of these ingredients are utilized in many of the recipes in this collection—a good Latina cook never lets anything go to waste!

DRY DESPENSA

AGAVE SYRUP: This neutral-flavored liquid sweetener is extracted from the spiky leaves of the agave plant (when agave is fermented, you get tequila). It is 40 percent sweeter than sugar, so you can use less of it in recipes that call for sugar; it is also completely vegan with a low glycemic index (good for those watching their carbohydrate intake, including diabetics), and a very neutral flavor. I like using agave syrup in sweet-savory sauces for meat, like in the Vanilla Mango Sauce for the Caramelized Apple and Walnut–Stuffed Pork Loin and in vinaigrettes.

ARROWROOT: The fine white powder of a tuber, arrowroot thickens at lower temperatures than cornstarch and also isn’t adversely affected by acid, meaning sauces, and especially citrus sauces, retain their bright, fresh flavor. It’s great for adjusting the thickness of a hot or cold sauce. Just dissolve a little in cold water and add it in—it thickens immediately once you add it, so you know right away if you need more. I use it in the Chicken Albondigas with Lemon Piccata Sauce.

ASIAN CHILI SAUCE: I like adding semithick Asian-style hot sauce (like Sriracha Thai chili sauce) to my mango barbecue sauce for Mango BBQ Baby Back Ribs and to Stir-fried Pork with Eggplant Picante. Made with spicy dried chiles and garlic, it’s thicker and has a rounder flavor when compared to vinegary Latin- and Caribbean-style hot sauces and isn’t overwhelmingly spicy.

BALSAMIC GLAZE: I save myself the step of having to reduce balsamic vinegar and instead buy balsamic glaze (crema de balsamico) in the supermarket. It is thicker and has a more caramel-y, subtle flavor than balsamic vinegar. Try pouring it into a squeeze bottle and using it to decorate a dish before serving the Sesame-Balsamic Sashimi Tuna with Wasabi Mayo and Baby Greens.

BEANS: Black beans are an absolute staple in the Latin pantry. You can find them in a range of recipes in this book, including Black Bean Soup with Bacon Sofrito, Black Bean and Jalapeño Hummus with Fresh Herb Drizzle, and Best Black Beans. I like to start with dried black beans, but you can substitute canned black beans if you’re in a time crunch. One cup of dried beans yields about 2½ cups of cooked, canned beans (remember to rinse the canned beans under cold water before using).

CAPERS: The flower buds of a Mediterranean shrub, capers are briny and tangy. They’re used a lot in South American cooking and come packed in either liquid or salt. Always rinse them under cold water before using. Great in the semisweet chimichurri sauce and they add that pivotal flavor to piccata sauce.

CARIBBEAN JERK SEASONING: This is one of my favorite preblended seasonings. It works beautifully with grilled chicken and barbecued ribs.

CHAMPAGNE VINEGAR: This high vinegar is made from the same grapes used to make champagne—pinot noir and chardonnay varietals. The fermented vinegar has a soft, vanilla-like flavor that I love in Tropical Passion Fruit Vinaigrette and in Pollo con Passion.

COCONUT MILK: Coconut milk in a Latin cookbook? In South America, there is a huge Caribbean and Asian immigrant population, so yes, I cook a lot with coconut milk. I like how it adds body and a hint of sweetness to soups and broths, like the Butternut Squash, Coconut, and Lemongrass Soup and the Clams and Mussels in Lemongrass Broth. Use light coconut milk if it’s available—it adds the same flavor with less fat (a little goes a long way, too!).

DRIED FRUIT: Cranberries, raisins, currants, and other dried fruits add a nice sweetness; try adding them to braised meats or to add texture to a salad like the Quinoa, Sweet Peppers, and Fig Salad. Along with a healthy pinch of chopped fresh herbs, dried fruit breathes instant life into a bowl of Basic White Rice.

DULCE DE LECHE: When milk and suga
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e breadsticks in half and cut the slices of prosciutto in half lengthwise. Wrap one of the pieces of prosciutto around one of the breadstick halves, starting at the broken end, and wrap twisting downward and slightly overlapping, so that around two-thirds of the breadstick is wrapped in ham. Press the ham firmly on itself to seal. Repeat so that you have four “Italian soldiers.”

Transfer the egg to an egg cup and cut off the top. Dip the Italian soldiers in the egg yolk and enjoy!

Welsh “Rabbits”

Preparation 5 minutes

Cook 4 minutes

Makes 1 portion

Not suitable for freezing or reheating

1/3 cup grated Cheddar

1 egg yolk

1 teaspoon cream or milk

2 or 3 drops Worcestershire sauce (or to taste)

pepper, to season

1 English muffin, split and lightly toasted

peas, thin slices of carrot or snow peas, 1 black olive (pitted and halved), a few fresh chives, and scallion, to garnish

Welsh rarebit is a slightly enriched version of cheese toast—children will probably enjoy this version of “rabbit.”

Preheat the broiler to high. Put the cheese, egg yolk, cream, and Worcestershire sauce into a bowl and mash together. Season to taste with pepper. Spread the cheese mixture on the cut sides of the toasted muffin, spreading right to the edges. Place the cheese-topped muffin halves about 3 inches away from the heat source (one rack down from normal broiling position)—don’t have them too close, as the egg in the mixture can make them brown very quickly. Broil for 3 to 4 minutes, until the cheese has melted and is golden and bubbling.

Decorate the cooked muffin halves with peas for eyes and strips of carrot or snow peas for ears, half an olive for a nose, chives for whiskers, and scallion for teeth. Serve immediately.

French Toast Sticks

Preparation 7 minutes

Cook 6 minutes

Makes 1 or 2 portions, depending on age and appetite

Suitable for children under 1

Not suitable for freezing or reheating

2 slices white bread

1 tablespoon strawberry or raspberry jam

1 tablespoon reduced-fat cream cheese or Neufchâtel (optional)

1 egg

1 tablespoon cream or milk

½ teaspoon sugar

2 drops vanilla extract

1 tablespoon butter, for frying

I like to use white bread, but feel free to use whole-grain. You can buy some very good sugar-free jam.

Roll the bread with a rolling pin to about half its original thickness and spread one slice with the jam. Spread the second slice with the cream cheese, if using, and sandwich together. Trim off the crusts, if you like. Beat the egg, cream, sugar, and vanilla together in a shallow dish.

Melt the butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Dip the jam sandwich into the egg mixture and turn over to coat. Put the egg-coated sandwich into the pan and fry for 2 to 3 minutes, until the underside is golden. Flip the sandwich over and cook for 2 to 3 minutes more, then transfer to a plate and carefully cut into sticks (a small serrated knife is good for this).

Allow to cool slightly and check the temperature before serving—be careful, as the jam can become very hot.

Mini Banana-Bran Muffins

Preparation 10 minutes

Cook 14 minutes

Makes 24 muffins

Suitable for children under 1

Not Suitable for freezing. Not suitable for reheating.

1½ cups raisin bran flakes

5 tablespoons warm milk

1 medium banana, mashed

1 egg yolk

There always seems to be the odd brown banana lurking in the bottom of the fruit bowl, and this is a great way to use it up. These are wonderful warm for breakfast or for an after-school snack.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line two 12-hole mini muffin pans with 24 paper cases.

Mix together the raisin bran flakes, milk, and banana, and let stand for 5 minutes. Transfer to a food processor with the egg yolk, oil, raisins, and sugar. Whiz for a minute to combine. Add the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and ginger, and pulse to combine. Spoon into the muffin cups (about 1 tablespoon for each mini muffin). Bake for 12 to 14 minutes, until risen and firm to the touch. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Suitable for freezing: Baked muffins are best stored frozen. Freeze in a resealable container or freezer bag. Thaw for around 30 minutes at room temperature.

3 tablespoons canola oil

2 tablespoons raisins

1/3 cup (packed) light brown sugar

½ cup whole wheat flour

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon baking powder

a generous pinch of salt

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

French Toast with Caramelized Bananas

Preparation 12 minutes

Cook 10 minutes

Makes 2 portions

Suitable for children under 1

Not suitable for freezing or reheating

¼ cup heavy cream

3 tablespoons milk

2 eggs

2 or 3 drops vanilla extract

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rally medium-to short-grain, with a higher percentage of amylopectin, or waxy starch, than indicas. They are grown in cooler climates and mountainous regions. Japanese rices (many not exported to the United States), Arborio, and other risotto rices, Kokuho Rose, CalRose, Nishiki, and other Japanese-style rices grown in California are all japonicas.

Kalijira: also called baby basmati and known in India as gobindavog. The grains look like miniature basmati rice grains, and, when cooked, have the same pleasant aroma and firm but tender texture. Available from Lotus Foods.

Long-grain rice: refers to rice varieties that are four to five times longer than they are wide. Long-grain rices contain more amylose, or dry starch; the grains cook up dry and separate. Basmati is a type of long-grain rice.

Medium-grain rice: refers to rice varieties that are less than two to three times longer than they are wide. Contain more amylopectin, or sticky starch; the grains cook up soft and tender. These rices readily absorb other flavors, which is why they are popular for paella and risotto. Examples are Arborio and Baldo.

Mochi: a sweet treat made in Japan from soaked and cooked short-grain sweet rice that is pounded until perfectly smooth, then rolled into small balls or other shapes.

Oryza sativa: Latin botanical name for rice, a semiaquatic member of the grass family.

Paddy rice: See rough rice.

Parboiled rice: rice that is steam pressure–treated before milling, forcing all the nutrients from the bran layer into the endosperm. Hundreds of years ago the process of parboiling was practiced in India and Asia by soaking the rice and then heating it over hot coals. The United States industrialized parboiling during World War II to provide a nutrient and stable grain to the United States armed forces. It was marketed commercially by Uncle Ben’s as converted rice, a registered trademark. Parboiling greatly reduces breakage during milling, but many cooks, especially in food service, prefer it because it always cooks firm and can stand for long periods of time without getting sticky. It has a creamy tan color and a less sweet, starchy flavor than plain milled rice. See also rosematta.

Paella: a popular rice dish that originated in Valencia in southeast Spain. It can be a simple dish of rice, beans, snails, and duck or rabbit, or a more elaborate one with shellfish, sausage, artichokes, and saffron. Bomba, Calasparra, and Valencia, three Spanish rices available in the United States, traditionally are used to make paella, but any medium-grain rice can be used.

Pilaf: a Middle Eastern dish of rice sautéed in fat (butter or oil) and then cooked in broth that often includes vegetables and/or meats. Typically it is made with long-grain rice, but medium-grain rice is sometimes used in Turkish pilaf. Pilaf is from the Turkish word pilau or pilaw.

Popcorn: a term used to describe the aroma of aromatic rices. The aroma comes from a naturally occurring compound—2-acetyl 1-pyrroline—found in all rice, popcorn, and some nuts.

Red rice: aromatic rice with a reddish-brown bran layer, a nutty taste, and a chewy consistency. Look for American-grown Wehani, Bhutanese red rice (imported by Lotus Foods), or red Camargue (from southern France) in specialty markets. Excellent in salads, pilaf, soups, and side dishes.

Retrogradation: a term describing what takes place when cooked rice is refrigerated and its texture changes from soft and tender to hard and chewy. Technically, the starch cells collapse, squeezing out the moisture and causing the realignment of the starch molecules. The process cannot be prevented but it can be reversed by reheating the rice.

To Reheat Cold Rice

On the stovetop: place in a skillet or shallow saucepan, sprinkle with 1 to 2 tablespoons water, cover, and heat over low heat just until heated through.

In the microwave: Place in a microwaveproof dish, sprinkle with 1 to 2 tablespoons water, cover, and microwave on high for 2 to 3 minutes. Let stand for 2 minutes before serving.

In the oven: Wrap in foil and place in a preheated 350°F oven for 10 to 15 minutes, or until heated through. (Only use this method if the oven is already on for another dish.)

Rice bran: the tan nutrient-rich outer layer that gives brown rice its color. High in nutrients such as thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, iron, potassium, and fiber, rice bran is used in cereals, baked goods, and vitamins. Studies suggest that the oil in rice bran may have cholesterol-reducing properties. Rice bran is perishable; buy it at a reputable health-food store with a good turnover and refrigerate once the package is opened.

Rice flour: finely ground rice, used in baked goods, breakfast cereals, pancake or waffle mixes, pasta, and snack foods. It is gluten-free and t
, with the exception of those introduced from the Americas, were first cultivated here by the Moors. Strawberries, or fresas, came from the New World and are extensively produced in areas of Huelva and Almería, the region’s westernmost and easternmost provinces, respectively; together they constitute the largest supplier of strawberries for the rest of Europe. Along the coast, warm-weather fruits, such as kiwifruits, pineapples, avocados, and mangoes, have found a perfect habitat.

Along Andalusia’s northeastern border, the Sierra Morena, the mountain chain that separates the region from the plains of La Mancha, is covered in holm oaks and maquis of laurel, broom, and thyme. A hunter’s paradise, the rugged land sustains a cuisine of fowl and game dishes, such as carne de monte, venison stew, and perdiz escabechada, partridge cooked in vinegar and wine.

Andalusia’s olive trees, which flourish on the rolling hills that lie between the mountains and the flatlands, are responsible for some of the best olive oils in the world and account for 75 percent of the country’s total production. Not surprisingly, this sizable, top-quality olive oil manufactory falls under the country’s rigorous Denominación de Origen (DO) program, a system of quality control that stipulates a product’s origin, production method, specific attributes, and other standards. Andalusia is home to eight different DOs for olive oil, including Priego de Córdoba and Baena in Córdoba Province; Sierra de Cazorla, Sierra de Segura, and Sierra Mágina in Jaén Province; Montes de Granada and Poniente de Granada in the province of the same name; and finally, Sierra de Cádiz in Cádiz and Sevilla provinces—a number no other region can match. Made from many olive varieties, these oils offer an ample spectrum of flavors, and when you drive along the roads that border the olive groves and olive mills, the air is filled with the intense aroma of the oil. Almazara, Spanish for “olive mill,” is derived from the Arabic al-ma’sara, which means “press,” another reminder of the centuries of Moorish influence in this part of Spain. Even the Spanish word for oil, aceite, which refers to any kind of edible oil, whether from olives, almonds, peanuts, soy, or otherwise, is derived from the Arabic a-zeit, which means “juice of olive,” reflecting the exclusive use of olives for their oil.

The oak woodlands of western Andalusia offer the perfect habitat for the pata negra (literally “black hoof,” the ibérico pig), which is made into the unique cured ham of Spain known as jamón ibérico. The Sierra de Huelva produces some of the best in the country. The pata negra also is the source of other delightful cured meats, such as lomo embuchado (also known as caña de lomo), which is made from the loin and rubbed with pimentón, salt, and garlic and then air cured, and morcón, a large, air-cured sausage made from lean pork cuts chopped and mixed with fat and seasoned with pimentón. The latter is also a specialty of neighboring Extremadura.

Every bar in Andalusia (and most bars in the rest of Spain) offers platters of cold cuts that include these or other similar cured meats. They make a perfect tapa and are often served as a first course. At the other end of the region, in the eastern mountain ranges of Granada, jamón de Trevélez, another excellent ham, is produced. It is cured for at least fourteen months at altitudes over four thousand feet, and because the pig used in the production of this magnificent ham is a white-coated Landrace, Duroc-Jersey, or Large White, and not the dark-coated pata negra, the ham is known as jamón serrano, rather than jamón ibérico.

The Mediterranean bathes the coast of Andalusia to the sun-bleached town of Tarifa, the most southern point on the European continent. Further west, the waters belong to the Atlantic. Exceptional local fish and shellfish are available in markets and restaurants. Little fish, including anchovies, chopitos, and chanquetes, are deep-fried, following the Arabic custom. Indeed, Andalusian cooks are masters of deep-frying, and they cook larger fish, such as marinated cazón (a member of the shark family), in the same way. These waters are also fished for urta, a special local red-skinned fish that is usually baked; carabineros, deep red jumbo prawns of exquisite and intense flavor; gamba blanca, the white shrimp of Huelva, and langostinos, prawns from Sanlúcar de Barrameda, both of which are primarily grilled; and atún (tuna), which has been caught in this strait since Roman times.

The unique mojama, a dry-cured tuna loin, is produced and celebrated in the fishing villages of Cádiz and Huelva. The only additives in this air-dried delicacy are salt, the sun, and a coastal breeze, exactly as Romans and Moors cured tuna centuries ago. Once the flesh is aged and firm and has turned a deep brownish red, the mojama is cut crosswise into paper-thin slices and served alone or on a slice of bread drizzled with o

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