[pdf | 1,37 Mb] The Complete Bartender by Robyn M. Feller – ebook library free

  • Full Title : The Complete Bartender (Updated): Everything You Need to Know for Mixing Perfect Drinks, Indexed by Liquor and Type of Drink
  • Autor: Robyn M. Feller
  • Print Length: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley; Revised ed. edition
  • Publication Date: May 6, 2003
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425126870
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425190135
  • Download File Format | Size: pdf | 1,37 Mb
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Features:

  • Exciting New Drinks

  • Frozen Blender Drinks

  • Beer and Wine

  • Punch

  • Low-Calorie Drinks

  • After-Dinner Drinks

  • Non-Alcoholic Drinks

  • Hot Drinks

  • Aperitifs

  • Holiday and Seasonal Drinks

Plus…

  • Stocking the Bar

  • Selecting Barware

  • A Guide to Ingredients

  • Making Toasts

  • Responsible Bartending

  • Responsible Drinking

  • Party Planning

  • Creating Theme Parties

 

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robyn M. Feller is the author of a number of nonfiction books.

 

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Ruth Tobias is a Denver-based food and

v

beverage writer, assistant editor at Sommelier

e

Journal, and author of the blog Denveater.

“For the first time the hottest chefs and eateries in Denver-Boulder’s r & B

She is also the author of Food Lovers’ Guide

vibrant culinary scene are corralled in one volume. Foodies

Landscape has everything to do with who

will discover must-visit restaurants as well as recipes that

to Denver & Boulder (Globe Pequot Press).

Coloradans are and thus how they cook, eat,

offer a true taste of Colorado and superlative photos by

Kansas-born and Oklahoma-bred, Tobias

chef-photographer Chris Cina.”

and drink. Ruggedness is a given: The cow-

received her BA in English from the University

—John Lehndorff, former dining critic, Rocky Mountain News, boys and outlaws of the Wild West have their

and food editor, Boulder Daily Camera

o

of California at Los Angeles in 1992 and her

modern-day equivalents in chefs and back-

u

j8i

EXTRAORDINARY RECIPES FROM

MFA in poetry from the University of Iowa

to-the-land enthusiasts who forage for forest

“Visually sumptuous and a darn fine read to boot, Denver & l

Writers’ Workshop in 1995. In 1997, she moved

mushrooms when they’re not tending to their

Boulder Chef’s Table takes readers on an engaging tour of top-shelf eateries and their signature recipes. Ruth Tobias’s effervescent prose D

DENVER & BOULDER

east to study literature as a PhD candidate at

beehives and chicken coops. This sense of

makes this a must-have volume for the Front Range foodie.”

e

Boston University; it was there that her fasci-

adventure and emphasis on locally sourced in-

—Clay Fong, restaurant reviewer, Boulder Weekly

r

CHEF’S TABLE

nation with all things edible and potable began

gredients are imparted on every plate served in

Ch

to alter her career plans, and since the turn of

Denver and Boulder’s restaurants and eateries.

“If anyone knows her way around the Denver and Boulder

RUTH TOBIAS

the millennium she has been publishing her

Photography by Christopher Cina

food scene it’s Ruth Tobias, who is among the most adventurous

Combined with a spotlight on cooking tradi-

and committed eaters I know. This spirited,

TH

work in regional and national publications,

E

tions from around the world, the Front Range

well-researched book is a treasure.”

ef

COLORA

completing certificate programs along the way

DO FRONT RANGE

dining scene has never felt so exciting and

—Tucker Shaw, senior editor for features

at The Cambridge School of Culinary Arts

vibrant, all the while set against a singular

and entertainment, Denver Post

’s

and the International Wine Guild in Denver—

backdrop: the Rocky Mountains.

T

where she now lives with her partner, Brit, and

a

cats, Jasper and Myshkin.

Denver & Boulder Chef’s Table gathers the

B

cities’ best chefs and restaurants under one

le

roof, featuring recipes for the home cook

Cover photographs by Christopher Cina

from over fifty of the region’s most celebrated

Author photo by Brit Withey

restaurants and showcasing full-color photos of

mouth-watering dishes, award-winning chefs,

and lots of local flavor.

Lyons Press is an imprint of

Globe Pequot Press

Guilford, Connecticut

Lyons

LyonsPress.com

Press

Celebrating Denver & Boulder’s best restaurants

& eateries with recipes & photographs

Den

Ruth Tobias is a Denver-based food and

v

beverage writer, assistant editor at Sommelier

e

Journal, and author of the blog Denveater.

“For the first time the hottest chefs and eateries in Denver-Boulder’s r & B

She is also the author of Food Lovers’ Guide

vibrant culinary scene are corralled in one volume. Foodies

Landscape has everything to do with who

will discover must-visit restaurants as well as recipes that

to Denver & Boulder (Globe Pequot Press).

Coloradans are and thus how they cook, eat,

offer a true taste of Colorado and superlative photos by

Kansas-born and Oklahoma-bred, Tobias

chef-photographer Chris Cina.”

and drink. Ruggedness is a given: The cow-

received her BA in English from the University

—John Lehndorff, former dining critic, Rocky Mountain News, boys and outlaws of the Wild West have their

and food editor, Boulder Daily Camera

o

of California at Los Angeles in 1992 and her

modern-day equivalents in chefs and back-

u

j8i

EXTRAORDINARY RECIPES FROM

MFA in poetry from the University of Iowa

to-the-land enthusiasts who forage for forest

“Visually sumptuous and a darn fine read to boot, Denver & l

Writers’ Workshop in 1995. In 1997, she moved

mushrooms when they’re not
rye bread recipe, delivery, bbq pork chops, mexican drinks, types of cookies,
g the Mysteries of Taste

CHAPTER FOUR: Are Gold Medals Worth Anything?

CHAPTER FIVE: Thinking Outside the Bottle

CHAPTER SIX: Gatekeepers Old and New

Part Three: Wine Revolutionaries

CHAPTER SEVEN: The Rebel from San Joaquin Valley

CHAPTER EIGHT: John Casella Grabs the World by the [yellow tail]

CHAPTER NINE: The Next Giant of Bargain Wines

Guides to Best Buys

Selected Bibliography

Acknowledgments

Index

Introduction

Every time I open a bottle of wine, I thank my lucky stars that I am living in the golden age of wine. Whether shopping in a local wine store, seeking out the latest offerings on the Internet, or ordering a bottle in a restaurant, I have an incredible array of choices at a wide range of prices. There is a wine for every taste, from sweet to dry, and every wallet, from fat to lean.

Though people have been making wine for some nine thousand years, during most of that period, good wine was produced in a relatively small part of Western Europe, and many people thought that truly great wine came only out of France. Today, however, the wine business has a global reach, and no single country or company can control the market. Large-scale wine production spreads from Cape Horn, South Africa, and New Zealand’s South Island to the north in Britain, where in recent years some interesting sparkling wines have been made. Even Canada is now famous for ice wines. As a result of all this competition, today the consumer is king.

In addition to widespread growth, there has been a dramatic increase in the quality of the wine being produced. A huge difference long existed between the top of the market, the famous French First Growths, and the daily wine drunk by the masses, which the French called vin ordinaire—and it was indeed very ordinary. The chasm, though, has dramatically narrowed in the last generation. British wine critic Jancis Robinson has noted: “The irony is that just as the difference in price between best and worst wines is greater than it has ever been, the difference in quality is narrower than ever before.” Outstanding wines such as Richebourg from Burgundy remain wonderful, but now less expensive Pinot Noirs from Oregon or New Zealand are also very good. Enological knowledge today flows easily from one region to another, and winemakers around the world have adopted best-practices procedures and invested heavily in the latest equipment. That is particularly true in Argentina, Chile, and South Africa.

Elliott Morss, a wine connoisseur and researcher, as well as a former Harvard professor and economist for the International Monetary Fund, in 2010 wrote, “There are people in the world who can actually tell the difference between a Romanée-Conti vintage 1990 and vintage 1991. Amazing! For the wine expert, a good part of the enjoyment in drinking wine is the ability to make such fine distinctions. But the vast majority of people who drink wine (myself included) have difficulty distinguishing between a wine rated 88 and 95 by WS [Wine Spectator].”

During the past few years, a group of young iconoclasts have begun challenging conventional wine wisdom with bold new ideas. They don’t live within the fences that an earlier generation built. They are trashing the rules, breaking the molds, and creating new production models. The innovators that you will meet in these pages are raising fundamental questions about how consumers learn about wine, how people taste, how judges select winning wines, and above all how much consumers should pay. They are changing the wine market in ways never seen before, and the old vin ordinaire is becoming something extraordinaire. These iconoclasts are the driving force behind the movement that is making better wines available to the masses.

I’d like to dedicate this book to the numerous people who have approached me since the 2005 publication of my first wine book, Judgment of Paris, with a simple question: Could you recommend a good wine that costs less than $10?

It’s not as difficult as one might imagine. James T. Lapsley, a professor of wine economics at the University of California–Davis, notes that California produces 60 percent of all the wine consumed in the United States, and half of that sells for less than $5 a bottle. In fact, good $10 bottles are available from all over the world. Critics and consultants, who recommend what wines people should drink, rarely talk or write about them. It’s the greatest story never told.

PART ONE

A Global Business in Turmoil

In the past few decades and without much public attention, the wine business has gone through many seismic shifts. Countries that once ruled the market, such as France, are dramatically losing their share. At the same time, new producers in the United States, Australia, and Chile have dramatically increased the quality of their products and become major
types of vegetables, ice cream ingredients, summer pasta recipes, weight loss resources, vegan naan bread,
diesem Buch zeige ich Ihnen, wie Sie es schaffen können, sich nicht länger müde, schmerzgeplagt und elend zu fühlen, sondern besser als je zuvor. Mir ist es gelungen, und Ihnen kann es ebenso gelingen!« Entgiften, schlank werden und das Krankheitsrisiko senken – mit einem Leckerbissen nach dem anderen.

—Mark Hyman, MD,

neunfacher #1 New York Times Bestseller-Autor

Wie Sie

IHRE ERNÄHRUNG UND IHR LEBEN ENTGIFTEN KÖNNEN

Selbst brave

Mädchen können

todkrank werden

Ich war Mitte 20 und bettlägerig. Meine Beine waren geschwollen, meine Muskeln schmerzten, mein Bauch war ein Ballon, und obwohl ich einmal einen gesunden Appetit gehabt hatte, wog ich nur noch 44 Kilogramm. Mein Darm war ein einziges Durcheinander, mein Immunsystem war kaputt, und meine einstige Energie war verschwunden. Mein Leben war völlig zum Stillstand gekommen. Ich war so krank, dass ich meinen Job kündigen musste und meine gesamte Zeit und mein Geld dafür aufwand, von Arzt zu Arzt, von Krankenhaus zu Krankenhaus zu laufen, um herauszufinden, was mit mir nicht stimmte.

Ich konnte es einfach nicht verstehen. Ich war immer so ein braves Mädchen gewesen. Ernsthaft! Ich hatte nie geraucht oder Drogen genommen. Abgesehen davon, dass ich während des Studiums etwas getrunken hatte, war ich, soweit es meine Gesundheit betraf, eine Heilige. Ich mied industriell verarbeitete Lebensmittel und Fast Food. Ich aß fettarmes Eiweiß und Grüngemüse. Ich trieb Sport. Ich trug Neutrogena-Sonnencreme auf, um meine Haut »gesund« zu erhalten, verwendete Off!, um von Insekten übertragene Krankheiten zu vermeiden, und trank meine tägliche Ration ungefiltertes Leitungswasser. Auch meine Kindheit war völlig normal gewesen. Ich war in einem schönen Badeort in New Jersey aufgewachsen. Zum Abendessen aß ich meist Hühnchen und Spinat. Meine Mutter wusch unsere Kleidung mit dem Waschmittel Tide und putzte die Böden mit Bleichmittel, und mein Vater verwendete für den Rasen Unkrautvernichter. Es gab keine familiäre Vorbelastung von chronischen Krankheiten oder Allergien. Ich hatte nur eine Laktose-Intoleranz. Ich glaubte, alles richtig zu machen. Warum passierte mir so etwas?

EINE DIAGNOSE, DIE DAS LEBEN VERÄNDERT

Ich war eine 25-jährige Marketing-Fachkraft in Manhattan und hatte beruflich einige Erfolge erzielt. Ich hatte für Ralph Lauren und das Magazin Vogue gearbeitet und etablierte mich gerade in meinem neuen Job bei der NBA (National Basketball Association), als ich etwas Merkwürdiges feststellte: Meine Beine schwollen an. Ich meine keine kleine prämenstruelle Wasseransammlung. Ich spreche von 18 kg Wasser in meinen Beinen. Morgens wachte ich auf, und alles war noch gut. Aber je weiter der Tag voranschritt, desto mehr Wasser sammelte sich, bis ich meine Knie kaum noch beugen oder überhaupt nur meine Hose ausziehen konnte.

Vollkommen verängstigt ging ich schließlich in die Notaufnahme. Dort wurden alle lebenswichtigen Werte gemessen. Dabei stellte sich heraus, dass meine weißen Blutkörperchen einen Wert von 1,1 ergaben (normal ist 4,0). Wie Sie sich denken können, war diese Diagnose sehr beunruhigend. Da sonst aber alles gut zu sein schien, ließ man mich nach Hause gehen, um die restlichen Testergebnisse abzuwarten.

Am nächsten Tag aß ich gerade am Schreibtisch mein Mittagessen, als mein Arzt anrief und sagte, ich müsse sofort aufhören zu arbeiten. Er gab mir eine Adresse in der Stadt. Ich ging dorthin und fand mich bei einer Krebsklinik in Manhattan wieder. Ich rief den Arzt an und sagte, er müsse mir eine falsche Adresse gegeben haben. »Nein,« sagte er, »genau dort sollen Sie hingehen. Sie haben Leukämie.« Wie bitte?

ODER VIELLEICHT DOCH NICHT

Ich war, milde gesagt, schockiert. Ich dachte, ich hätte mich gut ernährt und würde einen guten Lebensstil pflegen – und jetzt? Krebs? Das konnte nicht sein. Ohne viel mehr als »Guten Tag« zu sagen, ließ mich das medizinische Personal nach vorne beugen, um mich einer Knochenmarkbiopsie zu unterziehen. Es war die schmerzhafteste Prozedur, die ich je erlebt habe (stellen Sie sich vor, Ihnen wird ein Korkenzieher ins Steißbein gedreht). Die ganze Zeit über sagte ich mir jedoch: »Amie, du kennst deinen Körper am besten. Du weißt, dass es nicht stimmt. Halte durch.«

Wie sich herausstellte, war es falscher Alarm. Bei weiteren Tests zeigte sich, dass ich keine Leukämie hatte. Dennoch war irgendetwas mit meinem Knochenmark nicht in Ordnung. Es war wie Gel – normalerweise ein Zeichen für eine Mangelernährung. Im Grunde resorbierte mein Körper nichts von dem, was ich aß – ob gesund oder nicht. Darüber hinaus konnten meine Zellen Flüssigkeiten nicht festhalten, weshalb diese durch mich hindurchliefen und sich in meinen Beinen sammelten. Ich war erleichtert, keine Leukämie zu haben. Das Problem war nur, dass ich noch immer krank war und niemand wusste, warum.

DIE SCHULMEDIZIN MACHT AUS MIR EIN VERSUCHSKANINCHE
ganoderma coffee, chicken biryani, cool cupcakes, vegetable garden, dry aged beef,

80 g pastry flour

Pinch of salt

1 g (½ tsp) ground cinnamon

70 g dark chocolate

Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Line a half sheet pan with a silicone baking mat.

Mix the butter with the brown sugar in the bowl of the stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on medium speed until well combined, about 2 minutes.

Stir together the almond meal, pastry flour, salt and cinnamon in a bowl and then add them to the butter mixture. Mix on low speed until the dough starts clumping together, about 1 minute. Remove the dough from the bowl and form it into a single mass.

Break off randomly shaped pieces about the size of a hazelnut and place them on the pan in a single layer. Bake until lightly golden brown, 12 to 14 minutes.

Once the streusel is cool, melt the chocolate. Add just 80 grams of the streusel to the chocolate and stir until the streusel is completely coated. Spread in a single layer on a half sheet pan lined with parchment. Place the chocolate streusel in the refrigerator and chill until the chocolate is set, about 5 minutes. Remove it from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature.

MILK CHOCOLATE GLAZE

8 g powdered gelatin

40 g cold water

75 g water

150 g glucose syrup or corn syrup

100 g sweetened condensed milk

150 g milk chocolate

Red food coloring, as desired

In a small bowl, combine the gelatin with the cold water and stir well to dissolve. Let sit for 5 minutes to bloom.

In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, cook the remaining 75 grams of water and the glucose to 217°F (103°C). Remove from the heat and pour into a small bowl along with the condensed milk. Add the gelatin and the chocolate and let sit for 1 minute, then mix with an immersion blender until smooth. Add red food coloring, little by little, mixing until a desired shade is reached. Reserve at room temperature.

CHOCOLATE CREAM

80 g egg yolks

200 g heavy cream

200 g milk

28 g dark alkalized cocoa powder

40 g sugar

190 g dark chocolate

Place the egg yolks in a medium bowl. Combine the cream, milk, cocoa powder and sugar in a small saucepan and heat to 185°F (85°C). Slowly pour the milk mixture over the yolks while whisking. Add the chocolate and wait for 1 minute for it to soften, then blend with an immersion blender until smooth.

GOLD CHOCOLATE SPHERES

800 g dark chocolate

Gold leaf, as needed

Temper the chocolate in the microwave (see Techniques). Pour the chocolate into the demisphere mold to fill all the cavities. Tap the mold on the edge of the counter fast and vigorously for a few seconds, to release any air bubbles. Flip the mold upside down, holding it over a piece of parchment. Tap the side of the mold with a wide metal scraper to get rid of the excess chocolate. Scrape the top of the mold smooth and place it upside down on a clean piece of parchment.

After 1 minute, lift up the mold and scrape the top clean with the metal scraper. Place it right side up in the refrigerator and chill for 5 minutes, to set the chocolate. Repeat with the second mold. Remove the molds from the refrigerator and let sit for another 10 minutes.

Slide half of the demispheres out of the mold. Heat the metal scraper with a propane torch. Holding the demisphere flat on the surface of the scraper, melt the edges. Piece the melted edges together with the edges of one of the demispheres still in the mold. Continue until all the spheres are complete. Let sit 5 minutes at room temperature. Wrap in the gold leaf.

PARLOR TRICK! To get the gold leaf to stick to the chocolate spheres, try this tip! Spike the chocolate spheres with toothpicks. Fill a wide bowl, 10 centimeters (4 in) deep, with cool water and place it on a stool just below the counter edge. Open a book of gold leaf to reveal a full sheet and place it on the counter just above the water. Pinch the front corners of the sheet of gold leaf and slowly drag it onto the surface of the water. Plunge the chocolate into the center of the gold leaf and down under the surface of the water. While it is still underwater, turn the chocolate right side up and push it up out of the water. Place the toothpick into a piece of Styrofoam and allow the sphere to dry completely, about 1 hour.

Carefully drag a sheet of gold leaf over the surface of the water.

The gold leaf will stick to the surface. Magical, right?

Plunge the chocolate sphere into the center of the sheet of gold leaf and submerge it under water.

Turn the sphere right side up before pushing it back up out of the water.

ASSEMBLY

Cocoa powder, as needed

150 g Amarena cherries

Sugar, for dusting

Strain off and discard any liquid.

Remove the chocolate cake from the freezer. Lightly dust the cake top with granulated sugar so it will not stick when unmolding. Cut around the edges to break the cake awa

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