The 4 Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan by Michelle Schoffro Cook [pdf | 1,50 Mb] ISBN: 0470835095

  • Full Title: The 4 Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan
  • Autor: Michelle Schoffro Cook
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition
  • Publication Date: October 26, 2004
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470835095
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470835098
  • Download File Format | Size: pdf | 1,50 Mb
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Imagine waking up without an ache or pain, cruising through your daily tasks with abundant energy and ending your day with a refreshing night’s sleep. Then, imagine waking up to do it all over again. Think it is impossible? Think again. An accumulation of toxins can leave you feeling sluggish, achy, heavy, and out-of-shape. It can also lead to disease in the form of cancer, arthritis, diabetes, allergies and many other serious illnesses. Eliminate the myriad toxins and watch as you greet each day feeling great.

The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan shows you how to eliminate even the most difficult types of toxins, using a simple and effective step-by-step approach. You will learn how herbs, foods, juices, aromatherapy, exercise, breathing techniques and other natural therapies can help you to feel like a new and improved version of you. You will learn how to eliminate toxins from your respiratory system, liver, gall bladder, kidneys and urinary tract, skin, fatty deposits (including cellulite), lymph and more.

The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan goes well beyond other health books. Instead of the medical or esoteric jargon that fills the pages of many books, it presents powerful information and insight, yet maintains an entertaining approach. Based on a decade and a half of research and experience, The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan approach works by eliminating the source of fatigue, headaches, and joint pains to help your body rebuild. If you want to feel great, this plan will show you how.

 

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Michelle’s detox plan is an elegant, gentle, yet life-saving methodology, well conceived through personal experience, and thoroughly grounded in research. I heartily recommend it.”
—Dr Meg Jordan, PhD, RN, Editor in Chief, American Fitness

“This book, which presents powerful remedial techniques through diet, herbs, meditation and other holistic healing modalities such as just simply changing what we think about each day, should be read by every health professional, mainstream and complementary.”
—Bruce Burnett, CH, author of HerbWise: Growing Cooking Wellbeing

“At last, a well researched, simple and manageable purification plan for our bodies and our souls.”
—Linda Kavelin Popov, founder of The Virtues Project, author of A Pace of Grace: the Virtues of a Sustainable Life and The Family Virtues Guide

From the Back Cover

Praise for The 4 Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan

“Michelle’s detox plan is an elegant, gentle, yet life-saving methodology, well conceived through personal experience, and thoroughly grounded in research. I heartily recommend it.”
—Dr Meg Jordan, PhD, RN, Editor in Chief, American Fitness

“This book, which presents powerful remedial techniques through diet, herbs, meditation and other holistic healing modalities such as just simply changing what we think about each day, should be read by every health professional, mainstream and complementary.”
—Bruce Burnett, CH, author of HerbWise: Growing Cooking Wellbeing

“At last, a well researched, simple and manageable purification plan for our bodies and our souls.”
—Linda Kavelin Popov, founder of The Virtues Project, author of A Pace of Grace: the Virtues of a Sustainable Life and The Family Virtues Guide.

Imagine waking up without an ache or pain, cruising through your day with energy and ending it by enjoying a refreshing night’s sleep. Then, imagine waking up to do it all over again. Think it’s impossible? Think again. The key is eliminating toxins from your body and your life. The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan shows you how to eliminate those toxins, using a simple and effective step-by-step approach. Toxins can leave you feeling sluggish, achy, heavy, and out-of-shape. It can also lead to disease in the form of cancer, arthritis, diabetes, allergies and many other serious illnesses. This book explains how herbs, foods, juices, aromatherapy, exercise, breathing techniques and other natural therapies can help you to feel better than ever. You will learn how to eliminate toxins from your respiratory system, liver, gall bladder, kidneys and urinary tract and more. Based on a decade and a half of research and experience, The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan works by eliminating the source of fatigue, headaches, and joint pains to help your body rebuild. If you want to feel great, this plan will show you how.

 

Keywords

Craft Beer History

Buying Beer in Ontario

Ingredients

Ontario Craft Breweries

Recommended Ontario Craft Pubs

Introduction

Western Ontario

Guelph/Kitchener-Waterloo

The Golden Horseshoe

The GTA

Eastern Ontario

The Ottawa Region

Northern Ontario

Glossary

Breweries by Region

Index of Beers

Acknowledgements

About the Authors

TOP BEERS AND BREWERIES

Top Ten Breweries

Top Five …

American IPAs

Double IPAs

Pilsners

Stouts

Saisons

Porters

Lagered Ales/Kölschs

Lagers

Kettle Sours/Berliners

Imperial Stouts/Porters

Pale Ales

Jordan’s Picks

Robin’s Picks

Preface

The Ontario beer landscape has changed remarkably in the last year, with more breweries opening up seemingly every week. For the second edition of the Ontario Craft Beer Guide, we have included all of the ones that have opened and released beer in that time. Additionally, a lot can happen in a year for an ever-evolving business, so we have revised the core list of breweries from the first edition, taking changes of staff, brewing direction, ownership, and closures into account and updating tasting notes where (frequently) necessary.

We have also included a section detailing the story of Ontario beer ingredients to add to the context set down by the chapter on Ontario’s craft beer history. This allows us to further present the narrative of Ontario beer so you, the beer drinker, can see where we started, how far we’ve come, and where we stand now.

During the development of this edition, we have also greatly expanded on the recommended pubs list, from fifty listings to just over one hundred, providing a better range of options for you to explore on a night out.

Finally, we have included a photo section to provide a visual representation of the diversity and range found in Ontario beer.

Introduction

Until very recently, Ontario’s craft beer scene was a fairly manageable affair. The explosion of small breweries that has taken place since 2007 means that it has become very difficult, even for beer writers covering the province, to keep track of what exists, let alone how everything fits together. While it is excellent to have an up-to-date list of breweries from across the province, it became apparent to us in mid-2014 that additional context and information was required if anyone was going to be able to navigate the huge amount of choice that currently exists in the marketplace.

So, in a climate where new breweries are popping up at a rate of one a week, the most frequent question we were asked when writing this book was, “How did you know when to stop?” We chose to make the cut-off point for inclusion three weeks before we had to hand in the manuscript for this book, approximately December 15, 2016. Such a cut-off was needed; otherwise, our editors would have suffered more headaches than they get now from emails requesting late additions.

The second most frequent question, and perhaps one of the more loaded ones, was, “How are you defining what makes a craft brewery?”

As many know, there are a lot of definitions out there, from making small amounts of beer to being independently owned to being community focused. In this book we have included just about any brewery that might be considered “craft,” which means breweries, brewpubs, and contract breweries. In all cases, we have denoted the difference in types of business for the sake of clarity. Because contracting is sometimes used as a first step for a brewery before moving into its own facility, some are listed as transitional.

In cases in which a brewery has been purchased at some point in the past by a large multinational company, we have included them but made a note of the ownership. The historical context that breweries like Creemore and Mill Street have provided for the craft beer scene in Ontario cannot and should not be ignored.

The purpose of this guide is to assist you in navigating Ontario’s craft beer market and finding something that you might like to drink. Each brewery’s entry is composed of its contact information and coordinates, a brief biography to help give a sense of the brewery’s identity, and a series of tasting notes and ratings for the beers that it has on offer.

In producing tasting notes and ratings, we have strived for fairness. That being said, we have offered brewers every opportunity to put their best foot forward by directly consulting with them to see which beers (usually capped at eight examples) they feel best celebrate who they are. In the majority of the entries, we’ve used samples directly from the brewery itself, avoiding any potential problems that might arise from tasting the beer from dirty tap lines in a bar or pub or from
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neither did I own an Elvis costume. Was either really necessary? Bottom line, did I need an Instant Pot?

As it turns out, the answer was yes. (For the Instant Pot, not the Elvis costume.)

Yes, to yogurt that all but makes itself while I sleep. Yes, to dinners I can prep in the morning and leave to cook all day. Yes, to dried beans that I can make for dinner without the foresight to presoak them. Yes, to steaming vegetables without having to fiddle with the stovetop temperature. Yes, to rice that comes together quickly without moving it on and off the heat. Yes, to things I couldn’t have imagined I would be saying “yes” to: quick-pickled vegetables, no-fuss hard-boiled eggs, mulled cider.

In short, yes to the Instant Pot.

On the day my Instant Pot arrived, I opened the package but had only begun to unwrap the mystery. I was excited but . . . what had I gotten myself into? I grasped the idea of the Rice button, but why was there a Porridge button? What were the valves on the lid for?

How did I use this thing? I know how to bake, boil, skillet, and waffle (I’ve written books on the last two). But how to Instant Pot?

Cooking in an opaque, sealed chamber requires a culinary leap of faith. After the lid is locked tight, you can’t cook by sight or smell. Was I willing to take the plunge? Sure, but I had two goals:

1. Don’t ruin dinner.

and

2. Don’t anger the machine.

I was willing to sacrifice No. 2 if it meant that No. 1 could be accomplished.

I’m here to tell you that you can have it both ways. Not only that, you can take advantage of a unique and useful tool that may nudge its way onto center stage in your kitchen and change the way you cook. In short, you can master the Instant Pot.

The Instant Pot presents a new paradigm even for experienced cooks, but it’s one that you can master regardless of your experience or comfort level in the kitchen. While there is a bit of a learning curve, this book is here to make it more of a gentle slope—and one that lets you eat as you progress.

The Instant Pot is useful but not immediately intuitive. That’s where this book comes in. The main functions of the Instant Pot are covered—pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, yogurt maker, steamer—as well as the auxiliary functions that allow you to sauté food and to keep food warm.

You’ll learn:

• What the buttons mean

• How to decipher the LCD screen

• How to convert your favorite recipes for the Instant Pot

• How to clean your Instant Pot

• How the Instant Pot is different from other pressure cookers

• Which optional accessories you might want for your Instant Pot

In short, you’ll learn how to Instant Pot. Now, let’s get cooking.

How to Use This Book

This book arranges its chapters by function. You have a machine that offers many functions in one. What better way to master those functions than by breaking out and exploring each one separately? Of course, two functions are used mainly in conjunction with others and do not have their own chapters:

• The Sauté function plays a key role in many slow-cooker and pressure-cooker recipes.

• The Keep Warm function can serve a valuable purpose, but is perhaps less useful on its own.

For information on how to use each, see Instant Pot Basics.

Chapter 1

Instant Pot Basics

Meeting Your Instant Pot: Equipment and Set-Up

Function and Button Overview

How to Speak Instant Pot: Deciphering the LCD Readout

Converting Your Favorite Recipes to the Instant Pot

Cleaning the Machine

Instant Pot FAQs

Look, I get it. You were hoping this book would help you avoid reading the Instant Pot manual. If that’s the case, go to your happy place (puppies! kittens!) as you read this next bit: While this section covers the basics of the Instant Pot and hits the highlights of using and maintaining the machine, it’s worth looking over the manual that came with it. There won’t be a test later, but you might learn a few things.

The following pages cover all the ins and outs of this marvelous (and occasionally maddening) machine, but if it all feels like a bit much, take heart—the chapter introductions explain the use of each of the pot’s main functions, and the recipes tell you which buttons to push and when. No guesswork needed.

One final note up front: The recipes in this book were developed for a 6-quart Instant Pot (models IP-DUO60 and IP-DUO Plus60). They can also be used with the IP-Ultra (see About the Instant Pot Ultra).

Meeting Your Instant Pot: Equipment and Set-up

Although the specifics vary depending on the model of Instant Pot and manufacturer modifications, the Instant Pot includes everything you need to get started:

Stainless steel inne
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2. Divide the batter between two mugs and microwave separately for 1½ to 2½ minutes each until risen and firm. Serve immediately topped with a pat of butter or a schmear of cream cheese

• VARIATIONS •

FRUITY: Add a variety of dried fruits, such as dark or golden raisins, cranberries, cherries, figs, or dates. Soak ¼ cup of the dried fruits in hot water for 15 to 30 minutes, or overnight if you think that far in advance. Then drain them and fold into the batter with the nuts.

TROPICAL: Make this recipe a little more exotic with the addition of coconut, macadamia nuts, and dried tropical fruits like dehydrated pineapple, mango, or banana chips. Use about ¼ cup of these elements in place of the walnuts.

Lemon–Poppy Seed Muffins

MAKES 2 MUGS

Wake up your taste buds with the sweet tang of this popular morning muffin.

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

1 large egg

2 tablespoons buttermilk

1 teaspoon poppy seeds

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

¼ cup granulated sugar

6 tablespoons self-rising flour (or 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour plus ⅛ teaspoon baking powder)

Pinch of kosher salt

¼ cup confectioners’ sugar

1 tablespoon whole milk

METHOD

1. Put the butter and lemon zest in a mug and microwave for 30 to 60 seconds until the butter has melted. Whisk in the egg with a fork. Stir in the buttermilk, poppy seeds, vanilla, and granulated sugar. Add the flour and salt and beat the batter with a fork until smooth.

2. Divide the batter between two mugs. Microwave separately for 1½ to 2½ minutes each until risen and firm.

3. In a separate mug, beat together the confectioners’ sugar and milk until smooth. Pour over the finished muffins, and serve.

Blueberry Muffins

MAKES 2 MUGS

These muffins are an essential element in any breakfast repertoire. Fresh, sweet, height-of-the-season berries are ideal, but they are only available for a limited time. For the rest of the year, frozen berries will work just fine. Zap them in a little water for 30 seconds just to take off the chill before you add them to your mug batter.

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Finely grated zest of ½ lemon

1 large egg

¼ cup granulated sugar

3 tablespoons buttermilk

½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract

6 tablespoons self-rising flour (or 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour plus ¼ teaspoon baking powder)

Pinch of kosher salt

¼ cup blueberries (or try it with other fresh berries, diced stone fruits, or dried fruits)

Confectioners’ sugar or marmalade, for serving

METHOD

1. Put the butter and lemon zest in a large mug and microwave for 30 to 60 seconds until melted. Whisk in the egg with a fork. Stir in the granulated sugar, buttermilk, and vanilla. Add the flour and salt and combine. Fold in the blueberries. Divide the batter between two mugs. (You can top them with a sprinkle of cinnamon sugar or streusel if you’d like. See Coffee Cake recipe). Microwave separately for 1½ to 2½ minutes each until risen and firm. Serve immediately, topped with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar or a spoonful of marmalade.

• VARIATIONS •

CINNAMON-SUGAR: A teaspoon of cinnamon-sugar on top of the batter before cooking makes a lovely topping. Use 1 part cinnamon to 3 parts granulated sugar.

FRUIT OPTIONS: This recipe can also be made with raspberries, blackberries, huckleberries, cranberries, diced stone fruits, tropical fruits, and dried fruits.

Oat and Seed Muffins

MAKES 2 MUGS

Seeds are superhealthy! Flaxseeds, especially, are the latest wonder food, benefitting you with added fiber, healthy omega-3 fatty acids, and reducing the risks of heart disease and cancer—plus, the seeds add a delicious, nutty crunch. Yes, this recipe has sugar, which might negate the seed benefits, but we’ll just let that slide.

INGREDIENTS

3 tablespoons raisins

2 tablespoons apple juice

½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 large egg

3 tablespoons whole milk

¼ cup packed brown sugar

¼ cup self-rising flour (or

¼ cup all-purpose flour plus ⅛ teaspoon baking powder)

2 tablespoons old-fashioned rolled oats (not steel cut)

1 tablespoon flaxseeds

1 tablespoon sunflower seeds

1 teaspoon sesame seeds

Pinch of ground cinnamon

Pinch of kosher salt

¼ cup streusel (See Coffee Cake recipe)

METHOD

1. In a large mug, combine the raisins, apple juice, and vanilla. Microwave for 30 to 60 seconds, then set aside for 5 to 10 minutes to allow the raisins to plump while you make the batter.

2. In a second mug, whisk the egg with a fork. Stir in the milk and brown sugar. Add the flour, oats, flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, cinnamon, and salt and beat the batter until smooth. Fold in the plumped raisins and the soaking liquid.

3. Divide the bat
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t morning. “What else can you bake?” they demanded. I was on my way. There was the chocolate layer cake I made for birthdays, a carrot cake whose recipe had come from a friend’s mother in California, and my own brownies, which I had perfected when I realized that I didn’t want to go through life without a really good brownie recipe. Beyond that, I was starting from scratch. I began to investigate recipes, but I was seldom satisfied—too sweet, not chocolaty enough, too many additions. So I experimented and learned. I created Boom Booms, Harvard Squares, Chocolate Orgasms, Queen Raspberries … the names entered the Cambridge lexicon. I called them all my BabyCakes and went into the baking business.

I lugged hundred-pound bags of flour up to my second-floor apartment, where every doorknob was coated with chocolate. I learned to sleep with sugar in my bed and ignore that my floor crunched as I walked on it. I invested in a twenty-quart professional mixer and thirty-gallon trash cans to hold the sugar and flour. I woke at five in the morning and baked, took a quick run while the pastries cooled, then delivered them to Harvard Square, where customers lined up in anticipation. I must have been quite a sight, almost an emblem of the era, in my hot pants and platform shoes with a hairdo that stuck out about a foot from my head. I was having the time of my life.

Everything moved so quickly in the beginning that within six months I had outgrown the kitchen in my apartment. I built a new kitchen adjacent to Baby Watson, right in the heart of Harvard Square, and enclosed it in glass so that customers buying my goods could see the baking process. It was like a movie set, complete with custom-built cherry cabinets and cut-crystal knobs, an Art Deco lantern with satin shades, Edwardian botanical prints on the walls, and the insistent pulse of Toots and the Maytals in the background.

HELLO, ROSIE’S

After almost three years of working there and selling through Baby Watson, the next obvious step was to market my pastries myself. So I opened my own store in Inman Square in Cambridge and named it Rosie’s as a declaration of independence. This new place was a full-range bakery where you could pick up a muffin and coffee on your way to work, a pie to take home for dinner, or a custom-made cake decorated for a special celebration. If you had the time, there were tables where you could indulge in a brownie and a cup of tea while discussing the soaps, a proposal for work, or the meaning of life. Over time Rosie’s became the incongruous but appealing combination of a friend’s kitchen, a neighborhood bar, and a thriving bakery.

In those first days, though, going from Harvard Square to Inman Square was a shock. The two neighborhoods are less than a mile apart, but when Rosie’s arrived, Inman could be most charitably described as “funky.” Since restaurants and jazz clubs were opening there, we did a lot of business late at night when people came from all over the city. During the day we were a neighborhood attraction and had our regulars. There was the professor who came in every morning to read his newspaper over coffee and a lemon poppy-seed muffin, and a guy writing his magnum opus—about what I never found out—in daily sessions at one of our tables. We had little kids counting out pennies to buy a treat, mothers with baby carriages converging every afternoon at about three o’clock, doctors and nurses from Cambridge City Hospital who never ordered fewer than twenty items for takeout, and the firemen of Cambridge Local 30 who gave us a plaque in appreciation of our hospitality and pastries after a particularly bad fire nearby.

Graduate students who had once gotten stoned to the strains of the Velvet Underground stood shoulder-to-shoulder with businessmen who had never heard of the rock group but hungered just as avidly for our dark chocolate cake of the same name. Genteel women ordered Chocolate Orgasms in elegant but unflinching tones, while our nonchocolate products developed equally loyal followings since rugalah, butter cookies, and shortbread seemed appropriate tributes to everyone’s grandmother, no matter what her heritage.

In a neighborhood then short on decoration, the pink neon sign in our window drew people in, and, once inside, they stayed, mostly for the goodies but also for the homey atmosphere. I had determined from the first that Rosie’s would be a treat not just for the taste buds but for all the senses, so I painted and decorated, lugged in overstuffed furniture, and made sure we had fresh flowers every week.

Since those early years, Rosie’s has grown larger and more established. What began as a whim in Harvard Square now delights residents of Cambridge, Chestnut Hill, and Boston’s South Station. In the intervening years, my first customers have cut their hair, put on suits, acquired kids, mortgages, and life insurance, and ventured be
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they’re just cooked—depending on the temperature of the grill, this may be only a minute. Err on the side of underdoneness; if they’re a shade underdone, you can always put them back on the grill for a few seconds. Transfer the clams back to the platter. Serve the clams and crostini immediately.

HOW TO OPEN A CLAM

The easiest way to learn how to open a clam is to ask the shucker at a raw bar to demonstrate the technique—it’s not really difficult, just difficult to describe. Once you’ve mastered the technique, you can open clams with almost any knife, but using a clam knife, with its sturdy, blunt-edged blade, is the easiest and safest way to learn. Hold the clam on a folded towel in the palm of your hand; the towel prevents the clam from slipping while protecting your hand. The hinge of the clam should point toward your wrist, the outer rim of the clam toward your fingers. Keeping the clam level so as little juice as possible spills during opening, work the thin side of the blade into the outer rim of the clam between the edges of the shells. This is usually just a matter of placing the knife edge against the seam and squeezing the blade into the clam. Once the knife blade is between the shells, a simple twist of the blade will pry the shells apart. Carefully detach the meat from the upper shell with the knife. Twist off the top shell and discard. Place the clam in its half-shell on a platter spread with kosher salt so the shell doesn’t tip.

Goujonettes of Sole with Rémoulade Sauce

These tasty strips of sole are named for their resemblance togoujons,tiny members of the minnow family, which the French love to dredge in flour and fry whole. Goujonettes are prepared the same way, then served with lemon or a flavored mayonnaise. You can prepare a lovely presentation of the sole on a platter, but I have to admit that this is one of my favorite friends-hanging-out-in-the-kitchen dishes. Goujonettes are perfect right out of the pan and everyone loses whatever inhibitions he may have had about using his fingers to dip the tasty strips of sole into a bowl of rémoulade.

MAKES 36 HORS D’OEUVRES

1 pound fresh skinless sole fillets

½ cup milk

¼ cup unbleached all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons semolina flour

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 cups vegetable oil for deep-frying

1 bunch flat-leaf parsley for garnish

1 recipe Rémoulade (page 14), chilled

1. Remove any skin, bones, or cartilage from the fish fillets. Slice the fish into “goujonette” strips about 1 inch wide and 4 inches long.

2. Pour the milk into a shallow bowl. Mix the flours together on a plate. Dip the fish strips in the milk and then season with salt and pepper. Roll in the flour mixture and lay out on a tray. Refrigerate until ready to use.

3. Preheat the oven to 200°F. Line a sheet pan with paper towels and put in the oven.

4.Heat the oil in a deep pot to 350°F. Use a deep-fry thermometer to check the temperature. Carefully lower 4 or 5 goujonettes into the oil (put each in individually, or they’ll stick together) and deep-fry until they are golden brown on the outside and cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. As they finish cooking, transfer them to the sheet pan in the oven. Continue until all the sole is cooked.

5.Serve on a warm platter garnished with the parsley. Offer the bowl of rémoulade sauce on the side.

Mayonnaise—and Variations

Homemade mayonnaise will be a culinary epiphany if you’ve never made it before, both from the standpoint of taste and the sense of astonished accomplishment that goes along with making it. There are literally dozens of variations with different herbs and flavorings to transform the basic recipe into a memorable sauce. I’ve listed a few of the classics below. The convention in making mayonnaise is to use 1 cup of oil for each egg yolk. My version halves the amount of oil, resulting in a richer flavor and texture. Please use only absolutely fresh eggs, and allow all of the ingredients to come to room temperature before beginning the recipe.

Homemade mayonnaise will keep for 4 to 5 days in the refrigerator. Keep in mind that the flavor of fresh herbs may fade after a day or two, although the mayonnaise will remain usable for some time longer.

MAKES A GENEROUS ½ CUP

1 extra-large egg yolk

½ teaspoon Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

¼ cup vegetable oil

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. In a small bowl, beat the egg yolk with the mustard and lemon juice. Whisk in the vegetable oil, one drop at a time. This will establish the all-important emulsion; after you’ve made an emulsion with the vegetable oil, you can then begin adding the olive oil in a thin, steady stream, continuing to beat all the while. If it seems as though the olive oil isn’t being incorporated into the emulsion, stop a
y the hot water, holding your egg back with a spoon. Sit the (now dry) pan in the sink and turn the cold tap on, blasting the egg until totally cold. Roll the egg on the counter, pressing down gently, until the shell cracks all over. Peel very carefully and use a very sharp knife to cut it in half, lengthways.

Put the dhal into a bowl, sit the egg on top and sprinkle over the breadcrumbs, chopped coriander and sliced chilli (if using, which you totally should), then serve.

Lentil, tomato and coconut dhal

With wilted greens, lemon and yoghurt

I adore spring greens. They’ve been 99p for a huge bag in my greengrocer’s for as long as I can remember. Does inflation not affect greens? I take off the outside leaves if they’re grotty and then cut the whole cabbage up into ribbons, widthways. Dump them in a sinkful of water, as hot as a bath, and swish them around a bit. When they hit the butter in the pan, they’ll already be half-cooked.

Serves 1

25g salted butter

1 lemon, ½ juiced, ½ left whole

1 big handful of chopped spring greens or any other greens you like (approx. 250g)

1 portion of Lentil, Tomato and Coconut Dhal

1 heaped tbsp Greek-style yoghurt

1 pinch of pul biber (mild Turkish chilli flakes)

½ spring onion, finely sliced

flaked sea salt

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over a low heat, along with the juice of half a lemon. Wash the greens but do not shake dry, then add to the pan, along with a big pinch of flaked sea salt. Cover with a lid and cook over a medium heat for a few minutes until al dente, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, reheat the dhal in a small saucepan over a medium-low heat until piping hot, stirring occasionally.

Put the warmed dhal into a bowl and using tongs, add the buttery, lemony greens. Add a dollop of yoghurt and sprinkle with the pul biber flakes and sliced spring onion. Wedge of lemon on the side and you’re done.

Lentil, tomato and coconut dhal

With seared tofu, avocado, pickles and seeds

Smoked, marinated tofu is what I would call ‘beginners’ tofu’ – you can’t screw it up (see here). It doesn’t need pressing, it is ready to eat (hot or cold) and it is already flavoured by the smoking, so if you’ve never cooked with tofu, here is where you should start. All those benefits mean it is a bit more expensive than other tofus, so once you’ve tried it, move on to other types and learn how to use them. There’s a whole world of tofu out there!

Serves 2

2 portions of Lentil, Tomato and Coconut Dhal

1 tbsp mixed seeds (pumpkin, sunflower, sesame, poppy and nigella)

1 tbsp olive oil, ghee or coconut oil

1 x 200g packet of smoked marinated tofu, sliced (see my guide to tofu)

1 ripe avocado

a few pickles (any kind, homemade or shop-bought. Middle Eastern pickled turnips are particularly good for this)

Reheat the dhal in a small saucepan over a medium-low heat until piping hot, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, toast the seeds in a dry frying pan over a medium heat until starting to burst, shaking the pan often, then tip into a bowl and return the pan to the heat. Add the oil and turn the heat up to high. Once hot, add the tofu slices and cook for a couple of minutes until browned on both sides.

Peel, stone and slice the avocado. Stick the hot dhal in a bowl, add the tofu slices, avocado and pickles, then sprinkle over the toasted seeds.

Mean feat no-meat meatballs

In a wrap with hummous, soft herbs, toasted pine nuts and yoghurt

With tomato-butter sauce and pasta

Squished into a burger, in a bun with Dan’s fry sauce

Baked with tomatoes, basil and lemon ricotta

Mean feat no-meat meatballs

I wanted to create a veggie meatball recipe that would be really versatile. The flavourings go well with Italian-style dishes like the first two serving suggestions, but are also happy in a more Middle Eastern setting (inside a wrap with hummous and lots of fragrant toppings) or made into a burger with my mate Dan’s special Fry Sauce.

By the way, I tried frying them and they fell apart. Baked on an oiled tray, they cooked evenly and stayed perfectly spherical. So, learn from my experience. Baked balls. Now, that’s an alternative title idea …

Makes 22 balls

2 tbsp olive oil, plus extra for greasing

1 aubergine, cut into 3cm chunks

½ tsp chilli flakes

1 heaped tsp chopped rosemary leaves

1 heaped tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley leaves

½ tsp hot smoked paprika

1 lemon, zested

1 onion (approx. 100g), peeled and finely diced

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed or finely grated

75g fresh breadcrumbs

flaked sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the aubergine chunks and 3 tablespoons of water. Season and cook for 10 minutes until browned, stirring occasionally.

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