[top pdf books to read] Wise Words and Country Ways for Cooks by Ruth Binney, 071533008X

  • Full Title : Wise Words and Country Ways for Cooks
  • Autor: Ruth Binney
  • Print Length: 208 pages
  • Publisher: David & Charles PLC
  • Publication Date: September 26, 2008
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 071533008X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0715330081
  • Download File Format: epub
Download Link

>>>Download<<<

 

Directions
This is a unique and charming collection of cooking and kitchen-based sayings, proverbs and country wisdom.Containing the familiar and the unfamiliar, this mixture of practical tips and amusing anecdotes is the perfect addition to any kitchen.Ruth Binney explores the origin and merits of each saying, often proving that ‘old wives’ tales’ are just as relevant today as they were in times past.It features tips and advice on a wide range of subjects from meat and fish to fruit and veg, cooking methods to kitchen equipment, all the time providing pertinent lessons in the healthier and much less wasteful ways of former generations.Illustrated with delightful line drawings throughout, “Wise Words and Country Ways for the Cook” is the ideal gift for any cook or nostalgia lover.

 

Editorial Reviews

This is a unique and charming collection of cooking and kitchen-based sayings, proverbs and country wisdom.Containing the familiar and the unfamiliar, this mixture of practical tips and amusing anecdotes is the perfect addition to any kitchen.Ruth Binney explores the origin and merits of each saying, often proving that ‘old wives’ tales’ are just as relevant today as they were in times past.It features tips and advice on a wide range of subjects from meat and fish to fruit and veg, cooking methods to kitchen equipment, all the time providing pertinent lessons in the healthier and much less wasteful ways of former generations.Illustrated with delightful line drawings throughout, “Wise Words and Country Ways for the Cook” is the ideal gift for any cook or nostalgia lover.

 

>>>Download<<<

Keywords

daal, tetley tea, lobster recipes, online birthday cake delivery, beer games,
by’s

Bobby Flay’s Barbecue Addiction

Bobby Flay’s Bar Americain Cookbook

Bobby Flay’s Throwdown!

Bobby Flay’s Burgers, Fries & Shakes

Bobby Flay’s Grill It!

Bobby Flay’s Mesa Grill Cookbook

Bobby Flay’s Grilling for Life

Bobby Flay’s Boy Gets Grill

Bobby Flay Cooks American

Bobby Flay’s Boy Meets Grill

Bobby Flay’s From My Kitchen to Your Table

Bobby Flay’s Bold American Food

Copyright © 2017 by Boy Meets Grill, Inc.

Photographs copyright © 2017 by Ed Anderson

All rights reserved.

Published in the United States by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York.

clarksonpotter.com

CLARKSON POTTER is a trademark and POTTER with colophon is a registered trademark of Penguin Random House LLC.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Names: Flay, Bobby, author. | Banyas, Stephanie, author. | Jackson, Sally, author.

Title: Bobby Flay fit: 200 recipes for a healthy lifestyle / Bobby Flay with Stephanie Banyas and Sally Jackson.

Description: New York : Clarkson Potter/Publishers, [2017]

Identifiers: LCCN 2016044398 (print) | LCCN 2016048550 (ebook) | ISBN 9780385345934 | ISBN 9780385345941 (ebook)

Subjects: LCSH: Cooking. | Health. | LCGFT: Cookbooks.

Classification: LCC TX642 .F53 2017 (print) | LCC TX642 (ebook) | DDC 641.5—dc23

LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016044398

ISBN 9780385345934

Ebook ISBN 9780385345941

Cover design by Ian Dingman

Cover photograph by Ed Anderson

v4.1

prh

This book is dedicated to my daughter, Sophie, a vibrant young woman who has always embraced food to the core of her soul and has always thought of it as her friend.

You are a role model to other young women: you work hard, you play hard, and you celebrate your life around the table. Most notably, you’re inclusive of everyone around you and that makes me especially proud to be your father.

xo

Dad

Contents

A WAY OF LIFE

HEALTHY BASICS

VINAIGRETTES

Basic Vinaigrette

Mustard Vinaigrette

Mustard-Herb Vinaigrette

Pomegranate-Mustard Vinaigrette

Buttermilk Dressing

Blue Cheese Dressing

Green Goddess Dressing

Carrot-Ginger Vinaigrette

Nutty Vinaigrette

Cilantro-Peanut Vinaigrette

SAUCES, SALSAS, AND RELISHES

Pico de Gallo

Cooked Tomato Salsa

Avocado Crema

Cilantro-Spice Avocado Crema

Tzatziki

Feta Tzatziki

Radish Tzatziki

Cherry Tomato Tzatziki

Herbed Tzatziki

Guacamole

Tomatillo Guacamole

Curry Sauce

Peanut Red Curry Sauce

Pepper Curry Sauce

Green Herb Green Curry Sauce

Muhammara

Mustard-Mint Glaze

Ancho Honey Glaze

Green Harissa

Roasted Red Pepper Tomato Sauce

PICKLES

Pickled Chiles

Pickled Red Onions

Pickled Beets

Pickled Radishes

Pickled Green Onions

Pickled Saffron Shallots

SPICE RUBS

Mediterranean Spice Rub

Adobo Seasoning

Spanish Spice Rub

Steak Rub

CRUNCH

Crispy Whole-Wheat Couscous

Quinoa Croutons

Sweetened Quinoa Croutons

Baked Tofu Croutons

Frico

Sesame Frico

Fines Herbes Frico

Manchego–Smoked Paprika Frico

Spiced Almonds

RICE, GRAINS, AND BEANS

Quinoa

Farro

Brown Rice

Wild Rice

Wheat Berries

Pearl Barley

Beans

MEAT, POULTRY, AND FISH

Pan-Seared or Grilled Strip Steak

Pan-Seared or Grilled Chicken Breast or Chicken Thighs

Pan-Seared or Grilled Fish

Pan-Seared or Grilled Shrimp or Scallops

BREAKFAST

Vanilla Date Smoothie with Nutmeg and Orange

Roasted Peach and Pistachio Smoothie

Easy Being Green Smoothie

Coffee Hazelnut Smoothie

Coffee Chunky Monkey Smoothie

Blueberry-Pomegranate Smoothie Soup with Quinoa Croutons

Persian Baked Omelet with Fresh Herbs

Baked Egg Muffins with Piperade and Garlic Bread Crumbs

Avocado Toast with Red Chile and Cilantro

Israeli Breakfast Sandwich

Savory Yogurt Bowl with Chickpeas, Cucumber, and Beets

HOMEMADE TOASTED MUESLI THREE WAYS

Toasted Muesli

Overnight Muesli with Banana Yogurt Cream

Warm Apple Muesli Porridge

Muesli Bites with Toasted Coconut

PB&J Cream of Wheat

Maple-Cashew Cream of Wheat

OVERNIGHT OATMEAL THREE WAYS

Overnight Oatmeal

Savory Oatmeal with Poached Egg, Parmesan, and Bacon

Oatmeal with Ricotta, Chocolate, Orange, and Pistachio

Oatmeal with Apricot, Tahini, and Sesame

Whole-Wheat Muesli Pancakes with Maple Pear Butter

Spelt Waffles with Blueberry Compote and Lemon Ricotta Cream

Mini Zucchini-Banana Muffins with Berry Chia Jam

Oatmeal Breakfast Cookies

ENERGY BOOSTERS AND SNACKS

Vanilla Bean and Espresso Granola

Roasted Chickpeas

Cinnamon-Sugar Roasted Chickpeas

Raspberry–White Peach Granola Poppers

Peanut Butter–Chocolate Energy Bites

Mango Upside-Down Granola Bars with Macadamia and Coconut

App
chocolate pretzels, keurig coffee, how to decorate cupcakes, pizza delivery in my area, healthcare,
rst century A.D.)

M.F.K. Fisher on the Dislike of Cabbage (1937)

Cato on Cabbage Eaters (second century B.C.)

Elena Molokhovets on Borscht (1897)

James Beard on Radishes (1974)

Karl Friedrich von Rumohr on Cucumbers (1822)

Jane Grigson on Laver (1978)

Giacomo Castelvetro on Spinach (1614)

Karl Friedrich von Rumohr on Spinach (1822)

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings on Okra (1942)

Annabella P. Hill’s Gumbo (1872)

Giacomo Castelvetro on Artichokes (1614)

CHAPTER ELEVEN: A Hill of Beans Galen on Beans and Peas (A.D. 180)

Waverley Root on Cassoulet (1958)

José Maria Busca Isusi on the Smoothness of Tolosa Beans (1972) 178

CHAPTER TWELVE: The Fish That Didn’t Get Away Alice B. Toklas Murders a Carp (1954)

Taillevent’s Oyster Stew (c. 1390)

Robert May on Oyster Stew (1685)

Anton Chekhov on Oysters (1884)

Eleanor Clark on Belons (1959)

Archestratus on Small Fry, Filefish, and Sowfish (c. 330 B.C.)

José Maria Busca Isusi on Cod and on the Basque Problem (1983)

Tabitha Tickletooth on the Dread Fried Sole (1860)

Alexandre Dumas Père on Crabs (1873)

Peter Lund Simmonds on Land Crabs (1859)

Caroline Sullivan’s Jamaican Land Crabs (1893)

José Maria Busca Isusi on Eels (1983)

Ernest Hemingway on Fish in the Seine (1964)

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: Poultry, Fowl, and Other Ill-Fated Birds Anthimus on Chicken, Peacocks, and Other Domestic Poultry

(sixth century A.D.)

Caliph al-Ma’mun on Chicken and Pistachios (1373)

Hannah Glasse on Turkey (1747)

Waverley Root on Guinea Fowl (1980)

F. T. Cheng on Bird’s Nest (1954)

Ludwig Bemelmans on Poulets de Bresse (1964)

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings on Killing Birds (1942)

Rawlings’s Blackbird Pie (1942)

CHAPTER FOURTEEN: The Meat of the Matter Plutarch on Eating Meat (first century A.D.)

Claude Lévi-Strauss on Boiled vs. Roasted (1968)

Alexandre Dumas Père on Beefsteak (1873)

Anthimus on Eating Raw Meat (sixth century A.D.)

Nelson Algren on Nebraska Buffalo Barbecue (c. 1940)

Samuel Chamberlain on the Sunday Evening Barbecue (1943)

M.F.K. Fisher on Tripe (1968)

Grimod de la Reynière on Pigs (1804)

Apicius on Sow’s Belly and Fig-Fed Pork Liver (first century A.D.)

Mrs. Beeton on Sheep (1860)

Alexis Soyer on the Turkish Way to Roast Sheep (1857)

Le Mésnagier de Paris on Faking Game Meat (1393)

Eliza Smith’s Fake Venison (1758)

Eliza Smith on Recovering Venison When It Stinks (1758)

Neapolitan Recipe to Make a Cow, Calf, or Stag Look Alive

(fifteenth century)

Jane Grigson on Faggots and Peas (1974)

Apicius on Stuffed Dormice (first century A.D.)

Ludwig Bemelmans on Elephant Cutlet (1964)

Peter Martyr on Sea Turtles (1555)

Alexis Soyer on Cooking Meat for Fifty Men (1857)

CHAPTER FIFTEEN: Easy on the Starch Martino’s Sicilian Macaroni (c. 1420s)

Shizuo Tsuji on Rice (1980)

Neapolitan Rice with Almonds (fifteenth century)

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings on Hush Puppies (1942)

Angelo Pellegrini on Polenta (1948)

Catherine E. Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe on

Potatoes (1869)

Fannie Merritt Farmer on Potatoes (1896)

Sheila Hibben on American Potatoes (1932)

Pablo Neruda on French Fries (1954)

CHAPTER SIXTEEN: A Pinch of Seasoning Pliny the Elder on Thyme (first century A.D.)

The Talmud on Garlic (A.D. 500)

Platina on Basil (1465)

Platina on Saffron (1465)

Karl Friedrich von Rumohr on Sorrel (1822)

The Aobo Tu on Salt Making (1333–1335)

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: Just a Salad Platina on Lettuce (1465)

François Rabelais on Eating Pilgrims in Salad (1534)

Giacomo Castelvetro on Salad (1614)

Margaret Dods Johnstone on Salads (1829)

Mrs. Beeton on Endive (1860)

Grimod de la Reynière’s Warning on Celery (1804)

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN: The Thing About Truffles Waverley Root on Truffles (1980)

Giacomo Castelvetro on Truffles (1614)

Karl Friedrich von Rumohr on Edible Fungi (1822)

Ludwig Bemelmans on Pigs and Truffles (1964)

Pellegrino Artusi on Truffled Potatoes (1891)

Galen on Truffles (A.D. 180)

CHAPTER NINETEEN: Loving Fat Anthimus on Bacon (sixth century A.D.)

Newfies on Scrunchions (1974)

Platina on Olive Oil (1465)

Marion Harris Neil Tells the Story of Crisco (1913)

Fannie Merritt Farmer on Butter (1896)

Ludwig Bemelmans on the Buttermachine (1964)

William Verrall’s Very Fat Peas (1759)

CHAPTER TWENTY: Bearing Fruit Roaring Lion on “Bananas” (c. 1936)

Anthimus on Apples (sixth century A.D.)

Alexandre Dumas Père on Apples (1873)

Apicius on Preserving Fruit (first century A.D.)

Platina on Figs (1465)

Henry David Thoreau on European Cranberries (1859)

Henry David Thoreau on Watermelons (1859)

Ferdinand Hédiard on Mangoes (1890)

Christopher Columbus on Pineapples (1493)

Lionel Wafer on Pineapples (1699)

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE: The Dark Side of Chocolate Francisco
gluten free diet plan, juice full movie, homemade cake, is chocolate candy, rishi tea,
ies, and other goodies to keep me from feeling peckish during the signing. And thereafter, as I made my way from coast to coast, in a dozen different cities, confederates of theirs and readers of their blog turned up at most every signing, with more baskets and more dishes, each more toothsome than the last. And every basket featured lemon cakes. Sansa would have loved them.

Now that I am back home again, working on the next book, the baskets have stopped, alas. But fear not; we have this book instead, so you can cook your own versions of the favorite dishes of the Seven Kingdoms and the more exotic lands beyond. Those of you who cook can, anyway. And, hell, maybe even I will give a few of these recipes a try, assuming I can find a good source for dragon peppers.…

Eat hearty, my friends. Winter is coming.

George R. R. Martin

Santa Fe

January 21, 2012

About This Book

For many fans of the bestselling series A Song of Ice and Fire, reading these books is an immersive experience. Set in a quasi-medieval world, full of political intrigue, mayhem, and just a touch of magic, one defining quality of these books is George R. R. Martin’s incredible attention to detail. He paints intimate portraits of his characters, embroidered with poignant descriptions of the landscapes they inhabit, the clothes they wear, and—our primary concern for this project—the foods they eat. It is a rare Martin reader who has never felt a pang of desire at the descriptions of dishes that are familiar enough to make the mouth water and exotic enough to stimulate the imagination.

Having often felt that stirring hunger as we read, we were eager to try our hands at turning fiction into an edible reality. It only took a few meals before we realized that we were really on to something. We launched our food blog, Inn at the Crossroads, shortly after and were delighted at how quickly it attracted an enthusiastic fan base. Just a few months after launching the blog, we were given the incredible opportunity to create this cookbook.

One needn’t be a chef to enjoy the delicious fare of Westeros. Through our recipes, we aim to enable fans, regardless of how much or how little they know about cooking, to connect with their favorite fantasy series in a whole new way.

This cookbook is designed to take readers on a culinary journey through George R. R. Martin’s world—beginning at the Wall, then gradually moving southward to King’s Landing and Dorne, before taking ship across the narrow sea to feast with the Dothraki and in the Free Cities.

We can’t tell you how much we’ve enjoyed our culinary adventures, but we can try to show you. So we hope that you will join us in your own kitchens for a feast unlike any you have prepared before: a feast of ice and fire.

Welcome to the Inn!

Chelsea & Sariann

A Feast of Ice and Fire

Stocking a Medieval Kitchen

While researching recipes for this cookbook, we found that our modern pantry was often insufficiently stocked with some of the quirkier ingredients called for in medieval, Roman, and Elizabethan cookbooks. Palates and preferences have changed through the centuries, usually with one taste replacing another. In this vein, we were able to satisfactorily replace the more scarce ingredients with those readily available in today’s shops.

The key to successful cooking, whether in a medieval kitchen or a modern one, is innovation, so don’t despair if you cannot find the exact meats or spices called for in a particular recipe. Rather, take a step back and look at the dish as a whole. Get a feel for the dish, based on where it is served, and go from there. To help you get started, we offer a few easy substitutions below.

Easier substitutions for meats:

Aurochs (a now extinct bovine species): beef or bison

Goat: lamb

Pigeon: duck or other dark meat poultry

Quail: game hens

Some wonderful and underappreciated herbs and spices, many of which can be found in specialty food stores or online:

Savory: Similar to thyme, but more subtle. May be directly substituted for thyme.

Grains of Paradise: Often included in mulled wine, this was a precursor to black pepper. Many medieval recipes call for grains of paradise, which, while peppery, has a more complex set of flavors than modern pepper. If unavailable, substitute slightly less black pepper.

Aleppo Pepper: Gives a wonderful rounded heat without a painful bite. Substitute paprika if unavailable.

Galangal: Related to ginger, this spice has a sweeter, subtler taste. The ground variety is the most versatile, and other forms should be ground likewise before using. Ground ginger is an acceptable substitute.

Sandalwood: A powdered form of red sandalwood was used primarily as a red dye in historical cooking. Sandalwood has a very mild spice flavor. Modern food coloring may be substituted.

Saffron: Imparts a yellow-orange hue to foods and a sweet, haylike scent and taste.
whiskey drinks, orange chicken, charcoal outdoor grills, sashimi, nigella lawson recipes,
he flour into a bowl and set aside.

Put the chocolate into a heatproof bowl, set over but not touching a saucepan of gently simmering water (known as a bain-marie) and leave until melted, which will take about 5 minutes. Once melted, take the bowl off the pan and leave to cool for 5 minutes.

Using a standmixer, cream the butter, sugar and vanilla together for 5 minutes, or until light and fluffy. Add the beaten eggs, a little at a time, mixing well after each addition. While beating, pour the chocolate into the mixture in a steady stream. Add the sifted flour to the mixture and mix it in slowly.

Spoon the mixture evenly into the prepared tins and bake for 45 minutes (check them after 30 minutes), or until the cakes are springy to the touch and a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean. The cakes should be well risen with a crust.

Remove the cakes from the oven and leave to cool completely in the tins before turning out onto a wire rack and peeling off the lining papers. The crust will sink back into the cakes as they cool.

You can store the cakes wrapped in plastic wrap for 3 days or in the freezer for up to a month. Defrost overnight.

Ombre Cake

Makes: 18 cm (7 in) round cake SERVEs: 8–10

Preparation time: 45 minutes

Cooking time: 15–20 minutes each

Cooling time: 30 minutes

325 g (11½ oz) self-raising flour

325 g (11½ oz) unsalted butter, softened

325 g (11½ oz) caster (superfine) sugar

2 teaspoons natural vanilla extract

5 large eggs, lightly beaten

5 liquid food colours of your choice

Preheat the oven to 170°C (325°F) and line five 18 cm (7 in) round springform cake tins with non-stick baking paper. Sift the flour into a bowl and set aside.

Using a standmixer, cream the butter, sugar and vanilla for 5 minutes, or until light and fluffy. Add the beaten eggs, a little at a time, still beating to prevent the mixture curdling. If it does separate, just add a teaspoonful of flour and continue beating, occasionally scraping down the side of the bowl with a spatula.

Fold in the sifted flour with a spatula, and divide the mixture into five small bowls. Using a clean spatula for each, stir in a different food colour to each of the bowls. Add the colour a little at a time until you reach the desired shade and make sure that the colour is thoroughly mixed into the cake mixture.

Pour the cake mixture into the prepared tins and bake for 15–20 minutes, or until the cakes are springy to the touch and a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean.

Remove the cakes from the oven and leave to cool in the tins for 10 minutes. Then turn them out onto wire racks, peel off the lining papers and leave to cool completely.

You can store the cakes wrapped in plastic wrap for 3 days or in the freezer for up to a month. Defrost overnight.

Lemon & Poppy Seed Drizzle Cake

Makes: 18 cm (17 in) round cake SERVEs: 8–10

Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 35–40 minutes

Cooling time: 30 minutes

210 g (7½ oz) self-raising flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

170 g (6 oz) caster (superfine) sugar

finely grated zest and juice of 2 lemons

170 g (6 oz) unsalted butter, softened

3 eggs, lightly beaten

1½ tablespoons poppy seeds

For the lemon syrup

100 g (3½ oz) caster (superfine) sugar

finely grated zest of 2 lemons

100 ml (3½ fl oz) lemon juice

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) and line one 18 cm (7 in) round springform cake tin with non-stick baking paper. Sift the flour and baking powder together into a bowl and set aside.

For the syrup, gently heat the sugar, lemon zest and juice in a saucepan over low heat, stirring, for 2 minutes, or until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Put the cake ingredients, including the sifted flour mixture, into a bowl and beat with a standmixer for 5–8 minutes. Pour into the tin and bake for 35–40 minutes, or until the cake is springy to the touch and a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean.

Remove the cake from the oven and leave to cool in the tin for 5 minutes. Then, turn it out onto a wire rack and peel off the lining paper.

While the cake is still warm, use a skewer to poke some holes all over it, going right to the bottom. (Uncooked spaghetti can be used as an alternative to a skewer for this.) Drizzle the lemon syrup over the top and leave it to cool completely.

You can store the cake wrapped in plastic wrap for 3 days or in the freezer for up to a month. Defrost overnight.

Coffee & Walnut Cake

Makes: 18 cm (7 in) round cake serves: 8–10

Preparation time: 20 minutes cooking time: 35–40 minutes

Cooling time: 30 minutes

150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) self-raising flour

1½ teaspoons baking powder

75 g (2½ oz) walnut halves

150 g (5½ oz) unsalted butter, softened

150 g (5½ oz/2/3 cup) caster (superf

[collapse]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *